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Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Jim Spickard
Field #3. University of Redlands
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Field #5. Some Philosophical Reflections on the Decolonization Paradigm
Field #6. Most of the literature on ‘decolonizing’ sociology focuses on the extent to which our discipline has imposed its theoretical and methodological norms on other societies, thereby ‘Orientalizing’ them and suppressing their indigenous ways of knowing. This is useful, but it suffers two flaws. First, does not typically evaluate the actual knowledge that such indigenous approaches produce. Instead, it merely poses that knowledge’s validity on moral grounds. Second, it focuses on the past and present rather than on the future. It is the dialectical antithesis that, in Fichte’s formulation, is no stopping point in itself, but is instead a necessary way-station toward a synthesis that more accurately portrays the experienced world. This presentation explores these issues as they apply to the sociology of religion. It argues that to the extent that it wishes to remain a science, the sociology of religion is compelled to expand its conceptual toolkit to include non-Euro-American insights — on epistemological rather than on moral grounds. Decolonization is the first step in a two-step effort to produce a more comprehensive social scientific understanding of the religious sphere. Both steps have implications for institutionalized sociological practice.
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Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. Francisco DIEZ DE VELASCO
Field #3. Universidad de La Laguna
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Field #5. Le tourisme religieux bouddhiste en Espagne: quelques exemples
Field #6. Le bouddhisme en Espagne a une courte histoire (les premiers centres ont été créés en 1977), mais en quarante ans de nombreux centres et groupes d'écoles et diverses sensibilités se sont mis en place. Dans un pays où l'industrie touristique est très développée, les infrastructures permettent de développer un tourisme religieux bouddhiste qui emprunte plusieurs chemins. 1) Suivre les maitres. Du point de vue numérique, c’est peut-être la section la plus importante. Des visites de maitres bouddhistes se produisent avec assiduité en Espagne, rassemblant généralement des groupes d'adeptes principalement espagnols. Mais il y a aussi des cas dans lesquels cette attraction devient internationale. Karma Guen (Malaga) et Dzamling Gar (Tenerife) sont des exemples d'épicentres attrayants d'un tourisme religieux international organisé autour des enseignements de maitres reputés. 2) A la recherche d'un centre de retraite. L'activité des centres de retraite bouddhistes en Espagne se multiplie, notamment pendant les périodes de vacances. Certains d'entre eux seront passés en revue en soulignant les enseignements et les possibilités qu'ils offrent (retraites de longue durée, retraites d'intensification, etc.), ainsi que les formes qu'ils empruntent parfois à l'industrie du tourisme (offrant des services similaires à ceux des hôtels ou des restaurants). 3) Visiter le nouvel héritage bouddhiste en Espagne. Certains centres créent un nouveau patrimoine d'édifices et de monuments bouddhistes qui deviennent non seulement des lieux d'attraction pour les adeptes du bouddhisme, mais également des points d'intérêt pour le tourisme en général.
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Field #1. Catholicism and Global Challenges
Field #2. Roberto Cipriani
Field #3. Roma Tre University
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Field #5. Quality of Religion: a Multimethods Approach
Field #6. Twenty-two years after the research on Religiosity in Italy, the survey carried out in 2017 also covers 164 subjects appropriately selected, without the pretension of representativeness and generalizability. The stratification of the sample concerns three categories related to the degree (level of obligation, middle-superior diploma, degree), the distinction of gender (man, woman), residence (small towns, medium municipalities, large cities), geographical distribution (north, center, south and islands) and age (young, adult, elderly). The solution of a completely open interview, without predefined questions, was tested. In fact, for almost half of the sample, i.e. 78 cases, the interviewers tried to obtain narratives, reflections, interpretations and evaluations not solicited through specific questions on religiosity. For the rest of the 86 subjects interviewed, the first part was entirely free and the second part was on some concepts-stimuli relating to daily and festive life, happiness and pain, life and death, God, prayer, religious institutions and Pope Francis. The results of the qualitative analysis were also corroborated with sophisticated quantitative instruments: a program called T2K (Text to Knowledge), Lexical Correspondences Analysis and VoSpec procedure (Vocabulaire Spécifique des Groupes d'individus). An analysis sheet similar to a semi-structured questionnaire was then prepared to be applied to the interview texts, with the intention of capturing recurring patterns, values and representations.
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Field #1. Gender and Religion: Correlates and Causes
Field #2. Bat sheva Hass
Field #3. Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Field #4.
Field #5. Fashion and Faith Islamic Dress and Identity
Field #6. This paper focuses on the relationship between clothing and identity, and specifically on Islamic dress as an identity builder among Dutch Muslim women, whether they were born Muslim ('Newly Practicing Muslims’) or they chose to convert (‘New Muslims’), with Islam popularly considered by the native Dutch population as a religion oppressive to women. How do these Dutch Muslim women build their identity in a way that it is both Dutch and Muslim? Do they mix Dutch parameters in their Muslim identity, while at the same time inter-splicing Islamic principles in their Dutch sense of self? This study is based on an ethnography conducted in the city of Amsterdam from September to October 2009, which combines insights taken from in-depth interviews with Dutch Muslim women, observations in gatherings from Quranic and Religious studies, and one-time events. The authors will explore hip elements of the head covering, the hijab, in order to comprehend Islamic dress as identity builders. As well, we analyze the overcoat Muslim women in the Netherlands wear (regardless of whether the clothes they wear underneath are "Western" or traditional). This paper argues that in the context of being Dutch and Muslim, through choice of clothing ,these women express their agency: their ability to choose and act in social action, thus pushing the limits of archetypal Dutch identity while simultaneously stretching the meaning of Islam to craft their own identity, one that is influenced by themes of immigration, belongingness, religious knowledge and gender.
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Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Jared Bok
Field #3. University of Nevada, Reno
Field #4.
Field #5. The Transnational Expansion of Organized American Protestantism, 1991-2003
Field #6. This study examines the global expansion of organized religion by using event history analyses to investigate rates at which American Protestant mission agencies found new international ministries between 1991 and 2003. Empirically, this study fills a gap in the literatures on religion, organizations, and globalization, by introducing new data on transnationally-engaged organizations that are increasingly shaping the national and global dimensions of American Christianity. Theoretically, the study details the ecological and religious dimensions of global Protestant expansion in several ways. First, the results prove the utility of organizational ecological theories of density-dependence in explaining founding rates of new international ministries, demonstrating that religious organizations are subject to the same environmental pressures that secular organizations face. Second, this approach extends the use of density-dependence theory beyond the typical examination of organizational birth and mortality rates to include predictions of organizational behavior. Third, independent of these ecological effects, the results also show how mission agencies seek opportunities to enact religious social change in two primary ways: 1) by interpreting anti-religious state repression as motives for expanding their influence in those countries, and, 2) for agencies engaged in humanitarian activities, by gravitating towards rather than away from underdeveloped countries. The paper concludes by offering suggestions for further development in the scholarship on religious organizations and transnationalism.
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Field #1. The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments
Field #2. Zuzana Bartova
Field #3. Université de Strasbourg
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Field #5. Esthetics in religious lifestyles: a case study of Buddhist practitioners in France and in the Czech Republic
Field #6. The recent research on religion in consumer society suggests we consider it on the basis of the culture model of lifestyles (Gauthier – Martikainen, 2013 ; Turner, 2009). The present paper tries to analyse this hypothesis from the point of view of one of the most important lifestyle aspects, esthetics, as it is argued by Featherstone (1990). The research on religious esthetics is mainly centred on Islam in securalised Western-European societies (Tarlo, 2010 ; Herding, 2014 ; Lewis, 2015). However, individuals’ interest in other religious traditions and in other European countries has also an esthetic dimension. Based on three years of research into five Buddhist organisations in France et in the Czech Republic, the paper will focus on three main axes. Firstly, it is important to understand how Buddhist practitioners materialize their religiouse identity in their personnal lives. It will be argued that this esthetisation is rather invisible or indiscernable in the public. Secondly, it is discussed whether Buddhist practitioners’ attitude towards religion can be characterized as esthetic in nature through other individual strategies. Thirdly, these points are analysed to see how they correspond to the rather privileged middle class socio-economic position of practioners and to the context of a consumer culture promoting specific values.
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Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Anna Sofia Salonen
Field #3. Tampere University
Field #4.
Field #5. (Im)moderation in everyday food consumption
Field #6. Food consumption reveals fundamental aspects of us as humans, including our attitudes towards and relationships with humans and non-human others and the environment as well as the most pivotal individual, social and ecological problems of our time. The contemporary food system routinely produces more food than we are able to consume. At the same time, social stratification is nowhere more apparent than in foodways, yet in the affluent societies even the poorest consume unsustainably. In the midst of this ambiguity, ordinary people – whether religious or nonreligious – are constantly invited to exhibit their identity, personality and values through their food choices. Thus, studying of food consumption can inform the sociologists of religion about people’s everyday puzzles with regard to ethical and ecological matters. This study sets out to explore the content and construction of ethical views of ordinary people in the context of affluent society by studying moderation in everyday food consumption. Moderation is one of the cardinal virtues of antiquity and Christian theology, yet it deserves also sociological scrutiny. The study analyses how people discuss and make sense of their foodways, with a specific focus on how and to what degree the question of moderation is present in people’s accounts of their foodways, how people understand what is moderate with regards to food, and how these meanings are created, grounded, negotiated, contested and challenged through practices and in interaction. The paper presents preliminary findings of this work, drawing from focus groups interviews conducted in Canada in the spring of 2019.
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Field #1. The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe
Field #2. David Lehmann
Field #3. University od Cambridge
Field #4.
Field #5. The power of text in a conspiratorial frame: a case study from Salvador, Brazil.
Field #6. Religious groups locating themselves at various points on the frontier between evangelical Christianity and Judaism constitute a mosaic rather than a continuum, covering many permutations and combinations of ritual, language, ‘doctrine’ and eschatology. A mosaic defies typologizing but there are some apparent constants: a fixation on the foundation and survival of the state of Israel as evidence of a new Millenium or Messianic return; a strong interest in Biblical texts, especially Daniel and the Apocalypse; a fascination with the intricacies of the laws of the Torah; and a disinterest in connections with ‘flesh and blood Jews’ even when they travel to Israel. The paper will pursue these questions on the basis of fieldwork with a congregation in Salvador Brazil. Their narrative tells of the fatal break when the Jewish followers of Jesus were sidelined in moves which eventually culminated in the establishment of a state church by the Emperor Constantine – and it is this lineage which they are recovering. That was a conspiracy. They are drawn to conspiratorial ideas about the politics of their country which may reflect a cast of mind shaped by their fascination with scripture: just as there are hidden meanings behind the surface of the Biblical story, embedded in coincidences between words and texts across chapters and books, so in politics there are hidden plots and interests. Even the Holocaust fed into a grander narrative in which the Jews have a marginal role.
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Field #1. Politics and economics of monasticism
Field #2. Marcin Jewdokimow
Field #3. Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw (Poland)
Field #4.
Field #5. Transformations of everyday life in a cloistered monastery – a case study
Field #6. Transformations of everyday life in a cloistered monastery – a case study Following concepts of everyday religion (Nancy T. Ammerman) and lived religion (Meredith McGuire) within my paper, I demonstrate how monasticism is being lived today in selected monasteries in Poland, how different social processes impact this dimension, and what differences one may notice in “lived monasticism” in relation to the communist era and the period after the collapse of the regime. Scrutinizing the lived register – which is very hard to reach due to the characteristics of these institutions – allows for grasping relevant changes of monastic life such as interpersonal relationship, generational shifts, modes of connection to the “outside world” or the feeling of the pace of life. These changes pose challenges for the organization of these institutions and, hence, contribute to their organizational transformations. For instance, the omnipresence of new media has opened new channels of communication with the “outside world” which demands to rethink strategies of (dis)connection or individualization process results in delivering new, individualized generation of sisters which impacts formation’s procedures and adaptation of the rule of obedience. Findings for my paper were collected during the qualitative research conducted in three monastic monasteries in Poland, two female and one male (three monasteries so far, but since the project is on-going I assume that I will acquire data from at least two more monasteries).
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Field #1. Religion and the Contemporary Right
Field #2. Ari Engelberg
Field #3. Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Field #4.
Field #5. Religion and the Israeli Extreme Right: a case study
Field #6. This paper will investigate the intermingling of religion and right-wing politics in a radical right-wing Israeli Jewish organization by the name of Lehava. It is based upon ethnographic research including interviews, participant observation and the analysis of online texts. The official goal of Lehava which is to prevent intermarriage between Jews and non-Jews is a putatively religious goal; de facto, it focuses on preventing Arab men from courting and marrying Jewish women. The leader of the organization was a student of the late Rabbi Meir Kahane whose Kach party was decreed racist and outlawed in Israel; he views himself as following in his mentors footsteps. Lehava draws upon the organizational logics of two types of previously existing Israeli organizations: ultra-Orthodox NGO's devoted to combating intermarriage and populist urban right-wing movements advocating the use of more power in the Israeli Palestinian conflict. These latter organizations, unlike the Religious Zionist right-wing settlers who are mostly middle-class, draw the support of working class Eastern (Mizrahi) Jews who identify religiously as 'traditional', as well as some ultra-Orthodox. It will be argued that this synthesizing of religion and nationalism which is typical of the Israeli right-wing in general is epitomized in Lehava. It will further be argued that based on this, and other aspects of the organization, it has more in common with current Arab and Muslim extremism that it vilifies, than it does with the European extreme-right with whom it shares a common enemy.
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Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Justine Vleminckx
Field #3. UCL
Field #4.
Field #5. Ecologie intérieure et ré-ensauvagement de soi. Etude de cas d’un réseau éco-spirituel
Field #6. Notre communication sera fondée sur l’étude ethnographique d’un réseau transnational éco-spirituel de type New Age, la Rainbow Family, né aux Etats-Unis en 1972 et réunissant aujourd’hui des centaines de milliers d’adeptes essentiellement issus des milieux urbains nord-américains et européens. Présentés comme des âmes réincarnées d’Amérindiens massacrés par les premiers colons, les "Guerriers de l’Arc-en-ciel" sont fédérés autour d’une mission commune qui, selon la mythologie du mouvement, a été prononcée en ces termes par un Indien Hopi : "When the earth is ravaged and the animals are dying, a new tribe of people shall come unto the earth from many colors, classes, creeds, and who by their actions and deeds shall make the earth green again". Lors de rassemblements organisés dans des espaces choisis pour leur décor "hypernaturel" (Liogier, R., 2012), sauvage et pure, les "frères" et "sœurs" de la grande Famille Arc-en-ciel, "enfants de la Terre-mère et du Ciel-père", recourent à une série de pratiques "ancestrales" et "authentiques" (naturisme, véganisme, rituels chamaniques, etc.) à travers lesquelles ils expérimentent l’unité primordiale qui les lie au Cosmos. Leur principe fondamental, "Nous sommes nature", est le point de départ d’une "forme d’écologie à la première personne" (Pierron, J.-P., 2016), intérieure, qui vise avant tout à se reconnecter à ses "racines sauvages", à reprendre place dans la communauté du vivant, par la reconnaissance et le respect de ses lois.
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Field #1. The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments
Field #2. Ayang Utriza YAKIN
Field #3. Chair of Law and Religions, Catholic University of Louvain
Field #4.
Field #5. From Halal Marketing to ‘Islamic’ Management? Case Study on the First Halal Supermarket in France
Field #6. The purpose of the presentation is to describe the current evolution in the Halal economy, based on ethnographic research conducted in the North of France. What relationships and convergences / divergences are there between ethics (halal), ethnic (identity of a certain group), and etiquette in the halal market? More fundamentally, without focusing solely on the merchandising and deployment techniques of a halal market, how can we detect, measure and question the effects of this commodification on the management methods of the personnel involved? Does the halal trade generate or not specific Islamic management mechanisms? If so, which ones and in what terms? What is the relationship between ethics and ethnicity in the "Islamic" inspired economy? Do they create a “halal marketing” and how do they influence customer relations? The assumptions that support the article are of several kinds. We will first try to describe how the halal supermarket has “commodified” Islam which follows the concept of “commercialization/religious marketing” by Pattana Kitiarsa (2008), then the concept of “market Islam” by Patrick Haeni (2005) to better understand the phenomenon of the “halal supermarket”. In this piece, I argue that the “halal supermarket” in France is not the result of religious conservatism or (neo) fundamentalism, but rather the combination between, on the one hand, the spirit and ethics of the economy modern, and on the other hand Islamic religiosity and Maghreb culture. Their concept and practice of halal commerce, halal marketing, and halal management are therefore based on the concept and practice of the modern economy, "colored" by Islamic ethical and moral values.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Justine Manuel
Field #3. Université du Québec à Montréal
Field #4.
Field #5. Femmes catholiques et prêtres : lenteur et tergiversation autour de l’ordination des femmes
Field #6. Face aux revendications féministes du dernier siècle, l’Église catholique n’a pu donner des réponses qu’en demi-teinte, entre volonté de repenser la place de la femme et refus de leur accorder une égalité pleine et entière au sein de l’institution. Malgré leur exclusion en raison de leur sexe, des femmes catholiques se font ordonner prêtres depuis la moitié du XXème siècle. Ces rituels d’ordination, qui suivent à la lettre le rite romain canonique, posent doublement question : premièrement à l’institution catholique qui a renforcé son discours concernant l’interdiction de l’ordination des femmes, mais aussi aux catholiques féministes qui remettent en question la prêtrise telle qu’elle s’exerce et se pense actuellement (Jacob, 2007). Ces cérémonies seraient-elles alors le reflet des tergiversations féministes au sein du catholicisme ? Au cours notre communication, nous nous intéresserons aux stratégies de transformation du religieux par la pratique rituelle (Bell, 2009) : dans quelles mesures l’application stricte du rituel catholique d’ordination par des femmes représente-t-elle une transgression permettant l’intégration pleine et entière des femmes à l’institution catholique ? Nous aborderons ainsi plus en détails les débats autour de l’ordination des femmes catholiques aux ministères ordonnés, entre volonté d’intégration des femmes, critiques féministes de l’institution, et crispations misogynes catholiques.
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Field #1. The State and spiritual/religious healing processes in contemporary societies
Field #2. Géraldine Mossière
Field #3. Université de Montréal
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Field #5. Intersecting state regulation and alternative visions of healing: the creation of the profession «spiritual caregivers» in Québec health care system
Field #6. Chaplaincy in hospitals and health institutions in Quebec (Canada) has been the domain where the secularization process of the state has been the most achieved. In the aftermath of a long period of domination of the Catholic Church on social and political institutions, the province entered a rapid process of modernization, liberalization and diversification in the late 1960s. In the health care system, chaplains who used to depend on the Church have been replaced by secular «spiritual caregivers» who now report to the health and social services state department who self-attributes the duty to address the «spiritual needs» of the patients. This switch from chaplains’ religious domain to caregivers’ spirituality also involves the transformation of their roles, formation and competencies. As their efficiency is measured upon empirical scientific methods, the notion of spirituality is revisited within the biomedical thinking and semantics. As they are supposed to be able to work with patient of any religious confession and to participate to the hospitals’ medical team work, spiritual caregivers’ education is mainly based on humanist psychological theories and caring approaches. However, in the intimacy of their relationship with patients, spiritual caregivers find some spaces to introduce alternative therapeutic tools that usually stem from their own religious, spiritual or alternative vision of healing (energies, hypnotism). This presentation discusses how the development of the profession spiritual caregivers in Quebec intersects the State regulation in health care system with alternative healing techniques under the umbrella term of «spirituality».
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Jara Kampmann
Field #3. GESIS – Leibniz-Institute for the Social Sciences
Field #4.
Field #5. Does Atheism matter? – Atheism’s influence on homophobia in Europe
Field #6. Quantitative research on Atheism is close to non-existent. Our aim is to redress this absence of knowledge and understanding. In this paper we focus on attitudes, namely the relation between Atheism and homophobia in Europe. Applying three-level multi-level-analysis to the longitudinal European Values Study (1981-2008) we test whether Atheism exhibits an own effect on homophobia after controlling for individual and societal factors. Our results are twofold. Firstly, yes, Atheism matters. Atheists are significantly less homophobe than non-Atheists. Secondly, this result can only be found for Western Europe. In addition we find a divide between former communist and older democratic countries for the influence of the societal share of Atheists. These east/west patterns might be empirical traces of the only theoretically described two different types of Atheism postulated by Zuckerman (2007), where ‘organic’ Atheism prevails in Western Europe and mainly ‘coercive’ Atheism in Eastern Europe.
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Field #1. New Developments in the Study of Culturalized Religion
Field #2. Gustavo Morello
Field #3. Boston College
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Field #5. I’ve got you under my skin. Tattoos and religion in Latin America
Field #6. Tattoos are mainstream. They used to be a mark of marginalized populations (natives in remote areas, workers with risky jobs, like miners, sailors and soldiers, inmates, and urban tribes) but now one can see them on sport-persons, singers, movie stars and politicians. This social acceptance has also opened up the reasons for what a person gets a tattoo. However, many of them are still embodied identity markers, and they might tell a story that is meaningful to the person who got it. During 2015-2018, in a research on ‘lived religion’ in Latin America, teams from Montevideo (Uruguay), Córdoba (Argentina) and Lima (Perú) interview a convenience sample of 254 respondents from different social strata (upper/middle and lower) and religious self-identification (Catholics, Protestants, Others, Non-Affiliated). When asked to bring a ‘meaningful’ object (photo, tattoo, garment, and the like) of a picture of meaningful people or places, 24 respondents talked about tattoos and religion. This presentation explores the stories behind these tattoos and the religious motivations to get (or not) a tattoo that express respondents’ spirituality, and as a form to broadcast their stories to others.
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Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. Campergue Cecile
Field #3. GSRL
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Field #5. Les catholiques chinois dans la région lyonnaise
Field #6. Membre du projet ANR RELIMIG, il s'agira de présenter les premièrs résultats des enquêtes et des entretiens menés auprès de catholiques chinois dans la région lyonnaise et aussi sur Paris.
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Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Mitsutoshi Horii
Field #3. Shumei University
Field #4.
Field #5. ‘Religion’ as a Colonial Category: a new direction of the sociology of religion
Field #6. In the field of Religious Studies, there has been a deep reflection on the category ‘religion’, which posits the term’s coloniality. The idea of ‘religion’, as the binary opposition of ‘the secular’, has historically authorised ostensibly ‘secular’ imperial norms of colonisers as ‘rational’ and ‘civilized’ as opposed to ‘irrational’ ‘barbaric’ ‘religion’ of the colonised. Thus, the religious-secular binary has been intimately connected to the colonial power of Euro-American Empires. At the same time, there have been postcolonial reflections in Sociology, which highlight the imperial background of the discipline and colonial norms embedded in social theory. However, they ignore the centrality of the category ‘religion’. The category ‘religion’ is the foundational category of ‘secular’ Western modernity/coloniality. Therefore, critical deconstruction of ‘religion’ will expose what Mignolo and Walsh (2018) call “the colonial metrics of power”, that Sociology itself is part of. This paper aims to suggest that critical deconstruction of the category ‘religion’, as the term has been deeply linked to the colonial metrics of power, should be a point of departure for understanding what is meant by ‘decolonizing’ and for actually decolonizing the sociology of religion. Given this, there is an important role the sociology of religion should be playing. As it has the category ‘religion’ at its core, the sociology of religion should be the best place to start a critical deconstruction of the idea of ‘religion’. This will give the sociology of religion a new direction.
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Field #1. Liberation Christianity in Latin America. Politics, Religion and Spirituality in the Global South
Field #2. Luis MARTINEZ ANDRADE
Field #3. Collège d'études mondiales/FMSH
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Field #5. Écologie et théologie de la libération : quelles « affinités électives » ?
Field #6. La critique du capitalisme – en tant que système idolâtre –, est un thème singulier dans l’architectonique théorique et discursive de la théologie de la libération. Si, auparavant, le pauvre fut la figure préférentielle de cette théologie, désormais, la victime – au sens benjaminien du terme – est le sujet central dans son corpus. La victime se dédouble entre le pauvre d’une part et la nature de l’autre, tous deux ruinés par la grande industrie et l’agriculture extensive ; d’où la nécessité de repenser la lutte à partir des victimes du système hégémonique. Dans une large mesure, tout en prenant en considération la spécificité coloniale latino-américaine, la théologie de la libération partage la critique à la fois romantique et marxiste de la civilisation moderne et capitaliste. Cette critique est articulée à un projet de libération qui octroie à l’utopie un rôle crucial pour la défense de l’humanité et de la nature. De son côté, la théologienne Ivone Gebara élabore, depuis les années 1980, une théologie féministe de la libération. C’est justement à partir de la médiation du genre que Gebara tente de dépasser les dualismes épistémologiques de la théologie hégémonique car, à ses yeux, la vision anthropologique dominante a légitimé la soumission des femmes. Cette théologienne considère donc qu’il est nécessaire de dépasser les rapports hiérarchiques discriminatoires et injustes des sociétés et des Églises. Dans les années 1990, Gebara a développé une théologie éco-féministe dans laquelle les pauvres et la nature sont désignés comme les victimes du même système hégémonique. C’est ainsi que, cette théologienne explique, à partir d'une perspective holistique, la façon dont les femmes et la nature se sont vues exploitées par un discours patriarcal et par une logique moderne-capitaliste.
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Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Roberto J. Blancarte
Field #3. El Colegio de México
Field #4.
Field #5. The religious discourse of political actors in secular countries; the case of Mexico
Field #6. The new rise of populism in Latin America has given way to a peculiar form of political actors in countries with a secularized-laicized culture: appealing to a bigger framework of secularity/laicity, they introduce religious elements in their discourse, in legislation and in public policies. They establish therefore a "new normal" in politics, where religion makes a come back as a legitimizer of public institutions, through a search of a moral code which is neither secular or civil. Secularity/laicity becomes a vague reference with no substantial grounding or conceptual base. In the context of this populist rise (or come back), secularity/laicity enters in a new framework of meaning, diffused and vague, where leaders, not laws or institutions, become the main reference of political action.
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Field #1. Tracing Religion as a Global, Transcultural Knowledge Category
Field #2. Nancy Ammerman
Field #3. Boston University
Field #4.
Field #5. Constructing Religion in Context: Contributions From a Lived Religion Approach
Field #6. ”Lived religion” is a concept that has emerged as a way to describe the breadth of practice encountered in global contexts. While is it often construed as primarily concerned with unofficial, noninstitutionalized practice, this paper will argue for a broader social interactional and contextual approach to the everyday practices through which religion is enacted – to how people ”do religion.” It will use existing research to show how a lived religion approach can be useful across a variety of institutionalized and noninstitutionalized contexts. I will begin by specifying what characterizes interactions that can be analyzed as ”religious” and then examine key types of contexts that shape lived religion. Two kinds of contexts produce highly entangled religious social action – first, ”traditional” settings where religious action is not differentiated from other social action, but also ”monopoly” settings where religious action (or the eschewing of religion) is highly regulated by the state. A third kind of setting, the most commonly analyzed in existing research, is constructed by ”institutionalized” traditions and organizations. In addition, less-institutionalized (diffuse or fluid) practices have gained deserved attention, mostly as a result of diminished institutional religious expectations in the West; but equally interesting are the individual and collective adaptations and innovations resulting from immigration, new communication technologies, and other sources of unsettledness. Finally, lived religious practices may take place at the margins, among populations whose full social participation is or has been constrained.
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Field #1. Lived Religion and Museums
Field #2. Paride Stortini
Field #3.
Field #4. The University of Chicago
Field #5.
Field #6. Displaying Religion as Shared Cultural Heritage: Buddhism and the Silk Road in the Art and Collections of Hirayama Ikuo
Field #7. Museums build narratives of religion that are far from neutral and that can play an important role in shaping the religious imaginary of a varied audience. In my paper, I will analyze how religion, especially Buddhism, is presented in the art collections and museums associated with the Japanese painter Hirayama Ikuo (1930–2009), specifically in his Silk Road Museum. Hirayama is famous not only for his art, in which he reimagines scenes of Buddhist past and Central Asian landscapes, but also for his activism in the preservation of cultural heritage. The rich collections of artifacts he gathered in decades of travels, displayed in combination with his paintings, convey the idea of the Silk Road as a metaphorical chronotope of cultural exchange, peace, and prosperity, in which religion, broadly conceived as a cultural experience, can thrive. This message must be understood within the context of Hirayama’s trauma of witnessing the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. The message resonated in post-WWII Japan, suggesting a new role for the country as a promoter of international collaboration. I will argue for the religious dimension of such a display, which is confirmed by comparison with a similar use of art and religion at the Yakushiji temple in Nara. There, Hirayama’s paintings are ritually empowered and provide an imaginative background to the relics of the Chinese monk Xuanzang, who in the seventh century travelled along the same Silk Road.
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Field #1. Lived Religion and Museums
Field #2. Julia Martínez-Ariño
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Groningen
Field #5.
Field #6. Claiming Jewish heritage back: Contesting the musealisation and touristification of the Barcelona Call
Field #7. Jewish medieval neighbourhoods in Spanish cities have become an attraction for national and international tourists in the last decades, both Jews and non-Jews alike. Local and regional governments have seen in the musealisation and heritagisation of these urban spaces an opportunity for local economic development of deprived areas. At the same time, this musealisation by municipal tourism promotion agencies plays a role in identity politics. It provides a narrative that reconciles contemporary democratic Spain with the expulsion of Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492, and reinforces one single national identity that blurs regional particularisms. However, this economic and political use by governments and municipal tourism agencies of the medieval Jewish neighbourhood is contested by the Jewish communities, who feel alienated and excluded from such processes. In this paper, I analyse the attempts to “recover” the Barcelona Call (Catalan word for medieval Jewish neighbourhood) by Jews themselves. I capture the variety of small but significant spatial and symbolic strategies of the contemporary local Jewish communities to claiming their link to the neighbourhood by imbuing it with living Jewish “content”. I argue that their strategies are a way to claim back this neighbourhood from its touristic exploitation and to counter accompanying public narratives that misrepresent them. Moreover, I contend that the Barcelona Call is a contested space at the crossroads of struggles over authenticity, representation, recognition, historical memory, mass tourism, housing affordability, local politics and nationalism.
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Field #1. Secularism as social movement
Field #2. Pascal Tanner
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Lausanne
Field #5.
Field #6. "free thinking" in Switzerland
Field #7. The most important secularist movement in Switzerland are the “free thinkers”. They are the oldest and largest group of this kind and they are represented in all linguistic regions of the country. In my presentation I will focus on identity of free thinkers, on the basis of survey data (quantitative) and individual interviews (qualitative). Do they call themselves “atheist”, “agnostic” or “non-religious”? How important are these self-descriptions to members of the movement? And how do the self-descriptions differ with respect to sociodemographics and other variables? Le mouvement laïciste le plus important en Suisse est celui des "libres penseurs". Il s'agit du groupe le plus ancien et le plus important de ce genre et ils sont représentés dans toutes les régions linguistiques du pays. Dans ma présentation, je me concentrerai sur l'identité des libres penseurs, sur la base de données d'enquête (quantitative) et d'entretiens individuels (qualitative). Se disent-ils "athées", "agnostiques" ou "non religieux" ? Quelle est l'importance de ces auto-descriptions pour les membres du mouvement ? Et en quoi les auto-descriptions diffèrent-elles par rapport à la sociodémographie et à d'autres variables ?
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Field #1. Religious authority, political participation, and the Internet
Field #2. Carolina Falcão
Field #3. Patriota Karla
Field #4. Federal University of Pernmabuco
Field #5.
Field #6. On affection, networks and political action: notes on the religious protagonism in Brazil
Field #7. In this work, we aim to present what we call the religious protagonism in Brazil and draw attention to it as a form of visibility that arises in the typical communication flows of networked economy and digital activism. Differently from the Christian mediatic mainstream, grasping protagonism does not concentrate on popular TV shows or radio worships, but on certain forms of visibility on YouTube channels or Facebook and Instagram pages, for example. In other words, the locus of interest is outside of the televangelist auditorium (the common habitat of the hegemonic charismatic leadership) and the one who performs it is not necessarily a figure of institutional authority, like a priest or pastor. By addressing ecumenical issues and emphasizing a ‘grammar of the human rights’, we argue that protagonism can also access massive media spaces and be part of the ‘street politics’ producing a peculiar operation that embraces network economics, broadcasting agenda and political participation. We analyze two YouTube channels that promote a relevant space to the discourse and performance of the religious protagonism and that played an important role in the Brazilian Internet: Media Ninja and Muro Pequeno. In these two samples, there are some valuable aspects regarding religious protagonism, the most relevant, for this work, is the theological and political negotiations that their characters frame. We argue that religious protagonism proposes new limits for the Brazilian secular sensibility, as well as gives rise to another condition of religious authority that legitimizes affection (and not charisma) as its major capital.
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Field #1. New Developments in the Study of Culturalized Religion
Field #2. Avi Astor
Field #3. Damon Mayrl
Field #4. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Field #5.
Field #6. Theorizing Culturalized Religion: Towards a Synthetic Framework
Field #7. This paper aims to synthesize and critically analyze the growing literature on what we call “culturalized religion”, a term which refers broadly to identifications, orientations, practices, discourses, frameworks, and institutional arrangements that are rooted in, or attribute importance to, religious tradition independent of religious creed or ritual. Drawing on recent developments in the sociology of culture, the sociology of religion, and critical legal studies, we distinguish several distinct dimensions of culturalized religion and analyze their interconnections. We additionally identify a series of socio-political conditions and mechanisms that account for variability in the prevalence of culturalized religion in different territorial contexts. We conclude with an elaboration of promising areas of future research on this topic.
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Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Joram Tarusarira
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Groningen
Field #5.
Field #6. Expanding or reconstituting the Sociology of Religion?
Field #7. How knowledge is produced, authenticated and disseminated has increasingly become contested against the background that the current canon of knowledge does not provide equal distance to all knowledge systems in the endeavour to understand reality. In the Sociology of Religion, as in other disciplines, this raises the question not only about academic freedom but more importantly academic democracy (the right to participate in academic/knowledge decision-making ) and epistemic freedom (the right to think and produce knowledge from various epistemic sites (Mazrui 1978, Ndlovu-Gatsheni 2018). The paper is based on the understanding that the world exceeds the Western understanding of the world, there are more grammars, scripts and instruments other than those developed by Western-centric critical theory (Santos 2014), and there are limits to what we know and how we know. It is neither an effort to replace Western knowledge with the non-Western nor a mission to present non-Western knowledge systems as immune to criticism, for that will be kind fatalism (Bongmba 2001). It also does not seek to suggest that identity constitutes the validity of an argument. Joining the current efforts that question the applicability of the category ‘religion’ to non-western contexts, and challenges to the default view of the standard sociologist (Spickard 2017), it problematizes knowledge production in the ‘Sociology of Religion’ drawing on decolonial intellectual cultures, movements and philosophies such as pluriversality (Mignolo 2018), deprovincialization (Chakrabarty 2007), convivial scholarship (Nyamjoh 2017) and ecologies of knowledge (Santos 2014).
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Field #1. Religion and the Contemporary Right
Field #2. Samuel Dolbeau
Field #3.
Field #4. Université catholique de Louvain
Field #5.
Field #6. Revision of the bioethics laws in France : a study of Catholic mobilisation networks
Field #7. In France, laws relating to biomedical ethics have been periodically revised since 1994. The debates surrounding these successive revisions (2004, 2011, 2013 and 2018) constitute privileged observatories of the relationship between politics and religion. Indeed, many “Catholics of identity” (Baudoin & Portier, 2002) regularly mobilise to make their voice heard against these bills. This visibilisation in the public sphere is the result of a politicisation promoted by a dense associative and entrepreneurial fabric. In these networks, the Emmanuel Community (the largest movement stemming from the European Catholic Charismatic Renewal) plays a fundamental role. It organises many meetings, conferences, training courses relating to the inner-worldly commitment of Catholics, especially around bioethics issues. These places of socialisation, open to a wide public, bring together right-wing politicians, medical professionals as well as actors from the associative and religious sector. The purpose of this paper is to study, on the basis of events organised by the Emmanuel Community, the networks of political and religious socialisations at work in the debates surrounding the revision of bioethics laws in France. This paper is based on an ongoing PhD research and uses both a sociological and historical method.
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Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Anat Feldman
Field #3.
Field #4. Achva Academic College
Field #5.
Field #6. The Effect of Religion on Urbanism in Israel
Field #7. Religious Jews in Israel do not perform many acts on the Jewish Sabbath (from Friday sundown until Saturday at nightfall) – they do not travel on the roads or by airplane, cook, turn on the television, write, type on the computer, speak on the telephone, or shop. For them, the Sabbath is a day devoted to resting at home with their families. Secular Jews do perform these activities. Most Israeli cities are mixed – meaning they are home to both religious and secular populations. The municipal councils have to address the conflicting demands of their residents, particularly regarding the Sabbath, such as whether to permit or forbid vehicular traffic in neighborhoods with large concentrations of religious Jews, and the opening of stores and places of entertainment (restaurants and theaters). The problems are not only in regard to the Sabbath. Ultra-orthodox communities demand gender segregation in public places, such as separate swimming times for men and women in municipal pools, or partitions between males and females at public events. The lecture will discuss contemporary changes and struggles in Israeli cities in light of increasing demands by a small religious population to impose religious practices on the secular majority.
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Field #1. -- No Session --
Field #2. Lee Scharnick-Udemans
Field #3.
Field #4. University of the Western Cape
Field #5.
Field #6. Politics, Privilege, and Pluralism: Exploring the contestation of religious diversity in contemporary South Africa
Field #7. Theoretically and empirically, the relationship between religious privilege, and religious pluralism in South Africa has been under-researched and under-theorised. In order to assess the ways in which religious diversity, religious pluralism, and religious freedom are asserted and negotiated within the context of contemporary South Africa, this presentation scrutinizes the Christian Friendly Products campaign. This movement advocates against the ubiquity of the halaal food symbol and halaal food in South Africa. Halaal is an Islamic term, which refers to food products that are ritually permissible for consumption by Muslims. Through a critical discourse analysis of the campaign material along with selected news reports on the matter this project found that the campaign demands socio-political and religious privilege for Christian consumers by disparaging Islam. This presentation argues that the religious conflict demonstrated by this example illustrates the complicated ways in which religious notions of privilege and religious pluralism are engaged and negotiated within a context of religious diversity.
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Field #1. Contemporary Religiosities and Sociological Diagnoses in the West
Field #2. Robert Schäfer
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Fribourg (CH)
Field #5.
Field #6. Asceticim and Romanticism. Veganism as Ideal Type of Modern Western Religiosity
Field #7. Recent sociological diagnoses point to the fact that Western society currently undergoes a fundamental value transformation. In the wake of a crisis of the protestant work ethics and inner-worldly asceticism, thus the general argument, we witness the rise of a “post-romantic authenticity-revolution”, which is rooted in the “romantic tradition of awarding the singular” (Reckwitz 2017, see also Taylor 2007, Boltanski&Chiapello 2003, Illouz 1997). This leads to the increasing relevance of an artistic ethics based on romantic values like creativity, authenticity and self-expression. The complex entanglement of asceticism and romanticism can be seen as the secular religiosity of modern society. In my presentation, this structure is demonstrated by drawing on my empirical case study on veganism. While on the one hand veganism is based on an ascetic ethics of renouncement and rational self-control, it strives for the romantic hope for reconciliation with nature and harmony among all species on the other. The “vegan attitude” is an illuminating case for the dialectic nature of hegemonic belief-system of modern Western society. It allows specifying the sociological diagnoses mentioned above as well as testing their empirical validity. Boltanski, L., & Chiapello, E. (2003). Der neue Geist des Kapitalismus. Konstanz: UVK. Illouz, E. (1997). Consuming the Romantic Utopia. Love and the Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism. Berkeley: University of California Press. Reckwitz, A. (2017). Die Gesellschaft der Singularitäten. Zum Strukturwandel der Moderne. Berlin: Suhrkamp. Taylor, C. (2007). A Secular Age. Cambridge, Massachussets, and London: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Nader VAHABI
Field #3. Nader VAHABI
Field #4. LISST (DR) Université de Toulouse et CADIS EHESS Paris
Field #5.
Field #6. Muslim women and Human Rights in Iran
Field #7. The coming to power in 1997 of the reformist President Khatami almost two decades after the revolution, led to a complete upheaval of Iranian society. He no longer had confidence in repression and moved towards a secularization trend of the society. In other words, these trends of thought not only acknowledged that Islam was compatible with modernity, but they considered that this compatibility was the condition for its survival as a religion. With this discourse, public space began to open up and women became concerned by the public sphere. They became openly insurgent against the patriarchal moral of the Iranian society by founding NGOS, creating web sites, publishing articles and putting in motion actions in favour of reformists. We are interested in the paths of two women who along with certain men founded the Association of Human Rights Defenders in 2002. The first, Shirin Ebadi, emblematic figure of the Nobel Prize for peace in 2003, went into exile in 2009. The second, Nargess Mohammadi, has been imprisoned in Iran since 2016. They have insisted on the fact that human rights are compatible with Islam, which has led many men and women to join them and offer their help. Our problematic consists in retracing the paths of these women by inspiring ourselves with the thesis of the sociologist Ali Shariati: religion against religion. How have the two interpretations of Islam positioned themselves faced with the different social, economic and political problems? How can we avoid the instrumentalisation of Islam in these two interpretations? We will debate on these points during the panel.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Nanlai Cao
Field #3.
Field #4. Renmin University of China
Field #5.
Field #6. Issue of Illegality and Religious Rights among Chinese Christian Immigrants to Paris
Field #7. This paper explores how some undocumented Chinese Christian immigrants to Paris discuss and understand the issue of migrant illegality and their religious rights in the secularized France context. The majority of the Chinese traders and merchants in Paris are middle-aged, first-generation migrants who arrived in France in the 1980s and 1990s, often with a strong desire to accumulate initial capital and set up their family businesses. Most of them paid snakeheads a large amount of smuggling fee to come to Paris. This also applies to the Christians who in their migration narratives often downplay the illegality of human smuggling. The new arrivals have found it difficult to reconcile Christian faith with illegality. Hiring illegal immigrants and tax evasion are also routine practices among some migrant businesses striving to maximize profits. This study shows that it is the strong evangelical moral message that lends a powerful meaning framework for enterprising Chinese immigrants to flexibly engage the global economy. The notion of God’s grace is frequently invoked to provide legitimacy for their theoretically illegal migration and business practices, and it also represents an effort to theologize their day-to-day life in an alien social environment. By claiming their religious rights and appealing to the highest divine sovereignty, these traders and merchants have created a transnational transcendent world in which they are God’s children with full social entitlements. This ideal of universal Christian citizenship defies the assumption that human dignity and equality can only be recognized and realized in a nation-state framework.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Jörg Stolz
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Lausanne
Field #5.
Field #6. The state and the power of irreligious socialization. Secularization in East and West Germany as a natural experiment.
Field #7. Germany was a divided country from 1949 to 1989. During this time, West Germany remained a rather religious country, while East Germany became, under communist rule, one of the most secular regions of the world. We exploit this case of a natural experiment to test Voas’ model of secular transition. We find, first, that the form of the Voas’ model of secular transition does not hold for East Germany. In East Germany, contrary to the model’s predictions, the secular transition did not take the same path and at the same speed as in many other European countries. This shows that the secular transition can be strongly influenced by external shocks. Second, the underlying mechanism implied in the Voas’ model - i.e. religious socialization and intergenerational transmission - on the contrary works very well to explain the German case. The East-German state had such a strong secularizing influence because it succeeded in making parents stop religiously socializing their children who then in their turn chose secular partners and socialized their own children in a secular way. We discuss the implications of these results for the Voas model and for secularization research in general.
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Field #1. Mobility, ritual and public space. Transnational Catholic scenarios in large cities
Field #2. Renee de la Torre
Field #3.
Field #4. CIESAS Occidente
Field #5.
Field #6. The epiphany of Our Lady of Guadalupe in New Jersey: a ritual of faith and an ethno-national identity strategy in pluriethnic urban scenarios
Field #7. This paper addresses the issue of the unfolding of Guadalupan images in the global diaspora, taking into account the social meaning that in the present has the epiphany of the Virgin of Guadalupe in different Mexican communities in the United States. It will be based on an ethnographic study located in an emblematic case: Passaic, New Jersey (known as the Puebla of New Jersey), where the silhouette of the Virgin Guadalupana appeared on a trunks under a bridge and where this fact became dynamic along with fervor guadalupano collective strategies of cultural citizenship and conquest of the territory of the Hispanic population there settled. This unusual fact will be analyzed as a 'mitopraxis', which, according to Sahlins, updates the founding myth of the Mexican nation to give answers to the problems of the present.
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Sarah Wilkins-Laflamme
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Waterloo
Field #5.
Field #6. A Catholic Religious “None”?
Field #7. Among the many young adults who say they have no religion in both the U.S. and Canada, there are a variety of ways to be a religious “none”: from involved seculars, who do not hold any beliefs in the supernatural or the transcendent and who participate in organized atheist, humanist and secularist networks; to inactive non-believers, who do not believe in God or a higher power, but who are also not involved with any atheist, humanist or secularist groups; to inactive believers, who do believe in God or a higher power, but who do not take part in religious activities regularly and do not consider themselves as spiritual persons; to the spiritual but not religious, who define themselves as spiritual, but who do not take part in religious activities regularly; and finally to the handful of church involved believers, who do participate in religious activities on a regular basis without explicitly belonging to one religious group or tradition. With new 2019 survey data from a representative sample of 2,500 18-35 year-olds, this paper explores how childhood socialization in traditionally Catholic families and current-day residence in a Catholic-majority region such as the Canadian province of Quebec impacts an individual’s likelihood not just of becoming a religious none in general, but also of becoming one specific type of religious none over another. Is there such a thing as a Catholic religious none?
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Field #1. Religion in Comics
Field #2. Paulina Niechciał
Field #3.
Field #4. Jagiellonian University
Field #5.
Field #6. Zoroastrianism in Comics
Field #7. Zoroastrianism, statistically a dying-out religion, is rarely represented in modern literature and popular culture, including comics. I focus on two very different works, both published in India – home to the most populous Zoroastrian community worldwide (the Parsis). The first one is Zarathushtra, published in 1974 under the Amar Chitra Katha brand – one of the India’s leading selling comic book series. It aims to teach readers what it means to be an Indian and provides “a route to their roots” (McLain 2009: 12; cf. Khanduri 2010) and is popular both in India and diaspora. The reprinted comic is distributed, for example, by Zoroastrian migrants, as it matches the trend for simplifying the message of Zoroaster for younger generations that I have observed among contemporary Zoroastrians. The second example is the comic Silent Was Zarathustra (Ainsi se tut Zarathustra) by Nicolas Wild first published in French in 2014 and then translated into English for the Indian market by HarperCollins India. In my paper I will analyse how Zoroastriansim is represented in the chosen comics from a comparative perspective, answering whether the publications repeat stereotypes and clichés and to what extent they contribute to a simplification of the religion’s message. Contributing to the relatively new field of sociology of comics (cf. Brienza 2010), not only will I provide a qualitative textual analysis of the publications and their message, but also reflections on the context of the cultural production and transmission. References: Brienza, Casey (2010), Producing Comics Culture: A Sociological Approach to the Study of Comics, “Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics” 1(2), pp. 105-119. Khanduri, Ritu G. (2010), Comicology: Comic Books as Culture in India, “Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics” 1(2), pp. 171-191. McLain, Karline (2009), India’s Immortal Comic Books: Gods, Kings and Other Heroes, Indiana University Press.
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Field #1. Catholicism and Global Challenges
Field #2. Miriam Zimmer
Field #3.
Field #4. Center for Apllied Pastoral Studies (zap)/ Ruhr University Bochum
Field #5.
Field #6. Reorganizing Catholicism in Secular Society: How Dioceses Deal with the Decline of Resources in Western Germany
Field #7. This contribution discusses the organizational strategies of three big German dioceses facing recent developments of religiosity in the German population. The organized Catholic Church in West Germany has been affected by the processes of religious individualization, pluralization and secularization for many decades (see Pollack/Rosta, Meulemann). These processes have many effects on the Catholic Church in Germany, including reduced membership and less participation in religious activities, fewer priests and other religious personnel; some diocese even have to deal with sincere cutbacks in their financial resources. These declines in organizational resources endanger the continuation of the reproductive processes in the Catholic dioceses in Germany. The paper addresses the question of how the dioceses discuss, interpret and deal with these serious challenges for religious organization in the context of West Germany. Organizational theory, contingency theory, neo-institutionalism, resource-dependency theory and the theory of sensemaking provide different expectations of intra-organizational discourse and action based on resource decline. On the basis of thirty qualitative interviews with church leaders from three big dioceses, the presentation discusses the internal discourse (perception, interpretation and classification) about these cutbacks of organizational resources. Furthermore, it analyzes their strategies to manage these challenges in the form of structural changes, pastoral projects and communication processes. The comparative perspective shows that these three very similar dioceses differ distinctively in their internal discourse and strategies.
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Field #1. The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments
Field #2. Emanuelle Rodrigues
Field #3.
Field #4. Federal University of Pernambuco
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion and Neoliberalism: entrepreneurial ethics and forms of religiosity in the self-help market
Field #7. This article examines the ways in which neoliberal rationality has emerged in the religious field through discourses that stimulate subjects to be entrepreneurs of themselves. In Brazil, this is evident with the prominence of religious leaderships in the self-help market, especially in the literary segment, which has an expanded consumer audience. According to a survey by Publishnews, website specialized in publishing, among the 30 best-selling self-help books in Brazil between 2010 and 2017, eight were written by leaders of the Catholic Church and the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God. The relevance of self-help as a set of self-production techniques consists in the fact that these pedagogical practices affect the perceptions of the world of their consumers, with significant effects on the way they live. The growth of this segment in the personal development market seems to be part of a global economic movement of expansion of market ideologies to other social fields, especially in some countries of Latin America and central and eastern Europe. At first, this study focuses on the Brazilian self-help market, due to its continental dimensions, analyzing the narratives of personal transformation of religious leaderships that occupy this ranking. This article looks at the ways in which neoliberal economic logic has emerged in the religious field through what I call an entrepreneurial ethics.
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Field #1. Redefining ‘secularism’: European states and the regulation of (minority) religions
Field #2. Diane-Sophie Girin
Field #3.
Field #4. École Pratique des Hautes Études / Paris Sciences et Lettres
Field #5.
Field #6. Old dispute, new rules: Islamic schooling and the redefinition of private education in France
Field #7. This paper questions the recent redefinition of the old dispute around private schooling in the light of the place of Islam and Muslims in the French educational landscape. According to Baubérot (2004) it is as if having a new adversary – first embodied by veiled Muslim pupils and more recently by Islamic schools seeking public fundings – allowed to make peace with the old enemy (state funded Catholic schooling). Portier (2018) states that French style secularism (laïcité à la française) mutated over the years with the rest of the society. First based on separation ('laïcité-séparative') then collaboration ('-partenariale') and later on surveillance ('-de surveillance'). Our hypothesis is that we can identify the three stages of this evolution in the relations between the State and private education (predominantly Catholic): - Separation: in 1882, France established a distinction between religious teachings and public education, supporting an increase of private denominational schools. - Collaboration: from 1959 private education became eligible to state-funding, reactivating the "war" between seculars and Catholics. Nevertheless the dispute seemed resolved since 1984 with the failed attempt of the socialist government to abolish private schools. From then on they acquired the status of quasi public service. - Surveillance: in 2018 the law regarding the opening and the control of private schools was modified in response to the simultaneous peak in Islamic schooling and a wave of terrorist attacks. The law encountered a strong opposition from the representatives of Catholic schooling fearing for the freedom of education. Our analysis relies on data collected through interviews with legislators, members of the Department of Education, Islamic schools's representatives and discourse analysis of secondary sources.
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Field #1. Religious Diversity and Political Conflict in Europe
Field #2. Sébastien Quenot
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Corse
Field #5.
Field #6. Religions et nations sans Etat en Europe : le cas de la Corse
Field #7. Ile française de Méditerranée, la Corse est à la croisée de différentes dynamiques. Dans une France centralisée, la demande de reconnaissance du peuple corse s’est transformée en aspiration à la démocratie, encore inassouvie, malgré de multiples victoires électorales depuis 2015. Ce conflit politique classique s’ouvre désormais à de nouvelles dynamiques plus complexes, avec la question de l’intégration sociale, culturelle et politique des enfants issus de l’immigration ou bien encore l’attitude à adopter face à la crise migratoire. La mondialisation exacerbant les sentiments d’appartenance, elle entraine la réaffirmation de l’Etat-nation, parfois autoritaire, et laisse apparaitre de nouveaux enjeux, discours et praxis liés à la laïcité qui interrogent les approches interculturelles des responsables politiques de la Corse dont la filiation à la philosophie des Lumières de Pasquale Paoli se heurte à la laïcité fermée de la France, peu encline aux accommodements raisonnables, y compris territoriaux. Ce contexte fait de la Corse, île travaillée par la colonisation, un laboratoire euro-méditerranéen de la gestion de la différence. Comment désormais à la tête de la Collectivité de Corse, cette minorité de l’Etat-nation envisage-t-elle de gérer ses propres minorités religieuses, notamment musulmanes, qui représenteraient environ de 10% de la population afin de les intégrer au sein de la « communauté de destin », nation en devenir des indépendantistes corses, par-delà les souvenirs, les mémoires, les rites et les croyances, dans un contexte de montée des radicalismes et de retour du religieux ?
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Field #1. The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments
Field #2. Marie Vejrup Nielsen
Field #3.
Field #4. Aarhus University, School of Culture and Society, Study of Religion
Field #5.
Field #6. The marketization of the cemetery – governance of death culture
Field #7. This presentation will examines the influences of consumer choices on death culture today through an analysis of how the governance of cemetery culture changes in response to marketization. The analysis will focus on the governance of death practices through the analysis of cases of marketization. This implies a focus on how the front-line staff at the cemeteries negotiate this in relation to both users as well as other central agents, such as private entrepreneurs. Governance is seen as “multilevel and pluricentric governance networks” (Martikainen 2013) and there is a focus on the agents “with diverging interests interact in order to formulate, promote, and achieve common objectives by means of mobilizing, exchanging, and deploying a range of ideas, rules, and resources” (Torfing et. al. 2012). Research on mortuary variation across the Western world has suggested a threefold typology of the commercial, the municipal and the religious (Walter 2005) with the US, France and Sweden as typical examples of each. This presentation will discuss how these boundaries might be changing today due to large-scale shifts, especially marketization, across all models. Through the analysis of data from a research project on death culture in Denmark today, the paper will discuss how general, global trends of marketization are also manifest in areas, which have only recently been subject to marketization mechanisms to larger extent.
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Field #1. Pope Francis, Religious Authority and the Media
Field #2. Oren Golan
Field #3. Michele Martini
Field #4. University of Haifa
Field #5.
Field #6. Manufactured Charisma in the Digital Age: Pope Francis’ Leadership on Instagram
Field #7. In recent years, global religious leadership has been intensified through institutional and media efforts. From the Dalai Lama to Ali Khamenei, social media has become a pivotal platform, enabling various religious groups and leaders a social sphere to compete for religious primacy. This study aims to unveil the strategic media action that religious institutions deploy to fortify charismatic appeal of a leader and expand outreach. Focusing on Pope Francis’ Instagram account, the study inquires, how is online religious authority constructed, re-affirmed and implemented by religious organisations? To uncover the nature of online religious charisma we developed an unobtrusive research design that analysed the full Instagram production of Pope Francis’ official account (429 images). Through the prism of construal theory, our findings identified the Catholic church’s strategic management of social, spatial, affective and hypothetical distance. Hence, we suggest introducing the term of image-mediated-charisma, and its theoretical framing through digital distance. Concepts that are acutely observed in the religious media realm, and may be useful as an addition to the theoretical toolkit of the sociology of religion as well as meaningful additions to political sociology and the study of cultural leaders.
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Field #1. Tracing Religion as a Global, Transcultural Knowledge Category
Field #2. Heidemarie Winkel
Field #3.
Field #4. Bielefeld University
Field #5.
Field #6. Understanding ‘the Religious Other’: Decolonizing sociology of religion with Schütz and Levinas
Field #7. In post-secular societies, religion is a highly disputed way of knowing and interpreting the world. Religion is even viewed as an epitome of otherness, namely in a worldview that is defined by an immanent sense of reality located within the world around us. In the proposed paper, I argue in a first step that the analytical distinction between the secular and the religious emphasizes this perception of otherness and produces a methodological secularism. Instead the Durkheimian differentiation between the sacred and the profane is reintroduced as a theoretical lens that is sensitive to the social coexistence of multiple cognitive realities, also in secular societies. Against this backdrop I argue that the sociological understanding of ‘the religious Other’ can benefit from the combination of two interpretive, phenomenological approaches to intersubjectivity. (a) A.Schütz conceptualizes the processes of knowing ‘the Other’ in the frame of the paramount reality as the co-presence of two mental realities; following Schütz, it is possible to understand a religiously oriented sense as ‘normal’ facet of the paramount reality shifting between the profane and the sacred. (b) E.Levinas unfolds in a further step that ‘the Other’ is a subject whose difference is not integrated in ego’s perceptions of otherness; it is not categorizable as ‘Other’, because it is absolutely different and transcends the idea of otherness. My suggestion is that a reconsideration of the coexistence of religiosity/the sacred and the profane in line with Schütz and Levinas can support the decolonization of the sociology of religion.
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 1
Field #2. Inger Furseth
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Oslo/Norwegian School of Theology
Field #5.
Field #6. RELIGION IN THE WORKS OF PATRICIA HILL COLLINS
Field #7. This paper discusses the view of religion in the work of Patricia Hill Collins. Although Hill Collins has not developed a systematic view of religion, religion appears as a topic in her work. First, in her analysis of race, class, and gender as interlocking systems of oppression, religion becomes one dimension of the matrix of domination. Religion may become the most fundamental dimension of oppression for some groups, albeit not for all. Secondly, while feminism has traditionally operated with a binary view of religion, where religion is either oppressive to women, or women in religious communities subvert religion to change it, Hill Collins offers a more nuanced view. She speaks to the binary by pointing out that there were oppressive elements in the African American church teachings on women, which the women challenged and changed. Yet, Hill Collins has a broader view on the importance of religious institutions for women. She argues that the focus in the Black churches on social justice sensitized many African American women to gender issues, which resulted in a growth in feminist consciousness. Black feminism within these churches and other Black civil society organizations expressed a more comprehensive commitment to social justice than what emerged first within Western feminism. For many African American women, their community work was based in the churches, as these organizations provided an arena for Black women´s political activism for the entire community, and for Black feminism.
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Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. Alexis Artaud de La Ferrière
Field #3.
Field #4. SOAS, University of London
Field #5.
Field #6. L’institutionnalisation de la différence dans le catholicisme : Un étude des aumôneries catholiques de la migration
Field #7. L’Église catholique prévoit une pastorale spécifique pour les migrants visant à prendre en compte leur diversité de langue, d’origine, de culture, d’ethnie et de tradition liturgique. Ainsi, les aumôneries catholiques de la migration furent constituées dans le but d’encourager le maintien de la foi et de la pratique religieuse chez des populations catholiques immigrés. La diversité est une problématique qui soulève des tensions dans les positions et les pratiques de l’Eglise catholique. Selon la doctrine sociale de l’Eglise, les différences d’ethnicité ou de nationalité doivent être subordonnées à l’universalité de la dignité humaine.[1] Pour certains, cette universalité impose la notion que la condition d'exilé est enracinée dans la nature humaine : « Le chrétien ne peut s’identifier à aucun lieu, aucune terre, aucun enracinement de type biologique (race), ethnique, national, culturel ».[2] Pourtant, d’autres textes insistent sur la diversité des peuples comme richesse humaine et postulent que tout peuple détient des « droits culturels ».[3] Dans le contexte français, la diversité soulève aussi des tensions entre des interprétation plus ou moins intransigeante de l'universalisme républicain. Un modèle spécifiquement français d’assimilation culturel est souvent décrit comme épuisé, mais les alternatives multiculturalistes sont elles-mêmes mises à mal par des crises internes au sein des sociétés anglo-saxonnes. Cette communication présentera les premiers résultats d’une étude portant sur les aumôneries catholiques de la migration dans le cadre du projet ReliMig. Elle tracera les relations institutionnelles entre la Service National de la Pastorale des Migrants et des Personnes Itinérantes, les aumôneries nationales et leurs implantations à Paris et à Lyon, et les églises des pays d'émigration. Ensuite, la communication interrogera la stratégie institutionnelle de gestion de la diversité à la lumière de débats ad intra autour de la signification eschatologique des différences ethnoculturelles et de débats ad extra autour de la légitimité politique des différences ethnoculturelles.
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Field #1. The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe
Field #2. Rachel Feldman
Field #3.
Field #4. Franklin and Marshall College
Field #5.
Field #6. The Children of Noah: Has Messianic Zionism Created a New World Religion for Non-Jews?
Field #7. Today, nearly 2,000 Filipinos consider themselves members of the “Children of Noah,” a new Judaic faith that is growing into the tens of thousands worldwide as ex-Christians encounter forms of Jewish learning online. Under the tutelage of Orthodox Jewish rabbis online, Filipino “Noahides,” as they call themselves, study Torah, observe the Sabbath, and passionately support a form of messianic Zionism. According to their rabbi mentors, they are forbidden from performing Jewish rituals and even reading certain Jewish texts. These restrictions have necessitated the creation of new, distinctly Noahide ritual practices and prayers modeled after Jewish ones. Filipino Noahides are practicing a new Judaic faith that also affirms the superiority of Judaism and Jewish biblical right to the Land of Israel, in line with the aims of the growing theocratic “Third Temple Movement” in Jerusalem. Focusing on a case study of Noahidism in the Philippines, my paper will explore neo-colonial spiritual partnerships, racial ideologies, and gendered power structures, as male rabbis from the first world craft a new religion for Noahides in the global south. As Filipinos attempt to access Judaism through their new Noahide faith, their theocratic mentors continue to lay the foundations for a biblical Torah state in Israel. Together they are united in their desire to usher in messianic times and actualize Jewish prophecy. This emerging alliance of religious Zionism in Israel with the international Noahide community allows us to track the evolution of Jewish nationalism on a global scale, as messianic Zionism inspires conversion and new forms of religious life mediated by the internet.
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Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Christophe Monnot
Field #3. Salomé Okoekpen
Field #4. University of Lausanne and University of Strasbourg
Field #5.
Field #6. From deep and dark to thin green spirituality
Field #7. Until a decade ago, the common type of ecological discourses held within the milieu of environmental activists accentuated the political dimension of ecology. Issues such as nuclear energy, the reduction of biodiversity, pollution and North-South inequalities were strong components of these ecological claims. Somehow at the margins of this milieu more holistically colored discourses and practices have emerged recently. The latter revolve around the so-called Dark Green Religions (Taylor 2010) or are part of Deep Ecology (Næss 1972). Out of a four years research project, we observed that within the Swiss French-speaking context religious and common ‘spiritual’ references have gained increasing success among ecological activists. If the success of a holistic spirituality in urban European contexts is ascertained it is noteworthy that a specific type of contemporary spirituality is spreading – or to say it in Hubert Knoblauch’s terms ‘’popularized'' (2009) – in connection with ecological activism. Against the backdrop of such questions, this paper will focus on the observation and analysis of two ecological festivals taking place in the parks of two francophone Swiss cities. When ecological festivals take place there, a peculiar space-time regime is constructed introducing new norms and codes. The two festivals we shall describe in this text share a similar size, type of public, and aim but are also very different in terms of the way a reference to spirituality appears. We propose a description and analysis of some eco-rituals, and of the discursive, corporal, and spatial strategies that connect ecology and spirituality. A rhetoric of openness and inclusion is displayed as closely connected to a thin – light, non-submissive – type spirituality.
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Field #1. Pope Francis, Religious Authority and the Media
Field #2. Carlo Nardella
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Milan
Field #5.
Field #6. News Media, Pope Francis and Everyday Life
Field #7. Breaking with the rigid protocol of apostolic journeys through off-the-cuff speeches combined with striking gestures and freely answering questions from journalists aboard his flight, Pope Francis routinely successfully turns the news media's attention to the most important messages he intends to convey. While this captivating communicative style is prevalent in many moments of his trips, the Pope has also to deal with unexpected situations and events, outside of his control, noted and covered by media outlets from all over the world. The paper compares texts, images and videos published in the major newspapers’ online portals of two different countries, The New York Times and Italy’s La Repubblica, during a selection of the Pope’s international visits by identifying similarities and differences in the nature and tone of the news coverage, in which the recognition of Francis’s humanity appears to be one of the dominant dimensions. A key relationship is indeed that between the Pope and the accredited Vatican journalists, whose presence is assumed by Francis when he adopts his peculiar speaking and behavioral style.
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Field #1. Well-being and Well-dying in medicalized longevity society: How do our religious culture consider the dignity of life and death?
Field #2. Kikuko Hirafuji
Field #3.
Field #4. Kokugakuin University
Field #5.
Field #6. Young People's view of death and life in modern Japan
Field #7. Between 1995 and 2015, the Institute for Japanese Culture and Classics at Kokugakuin University and the Japanese Association for the Study of Religion and Society conducted 12 joint surveys to measure university students' perceptions of religion. Questionnaires were sent every year to approximately 4000 students inquiring about the extent of their interest in religion; whether their parents adhere to a particular faith; whether they believe in the existence of kami, souls, and buddhas; whether they believe in fortune-telling; and the extent of their interest in various social issues. We asked about attitude towards their view of death and life. For example, the survey asked ͆Do you believe a previous life?͇ and ͆Do you believe the existence of afterlife? ͆. According to these survey, the percentage of people who showed positive attitude; "I believe it," and "I believe it's possible," is majority. Even though, average of percentage of people who has religious faith is about 10%. In this presentation, I will introduce our survey on Japanese university students' perceptions of religion. Next, I will focus on the survey results concerning student’ s view of death and life. After that, I would like to discuss about their perceptions and some manga which is supposed to have much influence their view of death and life.
Field #8.


Field #1. Pope Francis, Religious Authority and the Media
Field #2. Adam Bajan
Field #3.
Field #4. Texas A&M University
Field #5.
Field #6. Catholic Media: Inside & and Outside
Field #7. Digital media use by Catholic organizations is a growing trend in today’s religious landscape; so much so that in 2016 Pope Francis publicly stated that digital media is “a gift from God” that helps Catholics “be better people.” However, this statement disguises the fact that Catholic organizations are often forced to walk a difficult path, balancing their piety against developments in secular digital culture that are often at odds with Catholic theology and world view. To investigate how this occurs, an ethnographic case study will be conducted at St. Mary’s Catholic Center, a youth-oriented Catholic church in East Central Texas. This church is located near a major US university and its congregation is primarily made up of young, tech-savvy undergraduate students. In a geographical region that is arguably over saturated with competing religious organizations, St. Mary’s operates an in-house social media marketing team and media internship program that is advertised to local university students. The goal of the study will be to understand how and why St. Mary’s uses digital media to market Catholicism to a large and youthful target demographic that has multiple competing religious organizations to choose to attend. To accomplish this the study will involve in-depth qualitative interviews with members of the church’s media and marketing team as well as members of its priesthood.
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Field #1. Hybrid religious identities: methodological implications
Field #2. Peter Beyer
Field #3. Peter Beyer
Field #4. University of Ottawa
Field #5.
Field #6. Variable Religious Identities among Emerging and Prime Adults in Canada: The Standards, the Hybrids, the Marginals, and the Nones
Field #7. The paper examines hybrid, standard, marginal, and absence of religious identities found among emergent and prime adults in Canada during the first decades of this century. Based on data from a series of research projects (census analysis, surveys, interviews) conducted among immigrant and non-immigrant younger adults in Canada from 2004 to 2016, the analysis suggests the following: degree of subjective religiousness correlates highly with standard religious identities (i.e. regular and orthodox practitioners of one and only one recognized religion); such standard religious identities are most frequent among Muslims and Conservative Christians, but significantly present in other religions/confessions/denominations as well; religious identities are largely stable from emerging to prime adulthood (18-24 vs 25-45); the more-spiritual-than-religious are numerous, but often have little defined belief and practice content; hybridity across religions (e.g. multiple belonging) is comparatively uncommon, but hybridity as eclectic bricolage, marginal religion à la carte, and no religious identity, are much more common. The paper concludes with a discussion of methodological challenges encountered by the research in finding and measuring the non-standard religious identities, whether hybrid, eclectic, spiritual-but-not-religious, marginal, or none.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Gender and Religion: Correlates and Causes
Field #2. Isabella Kasselstrand
Field #3.
Field #4. California State University Bakersfield
Field #5.
Field #6. Becoming Secular in the United States: Revisiting the Effects of Women’s Employment
Field #7. As the number of religiously unaffiliated Americans has grown over the last few decades, so has the body of literature on religious apostasy. Such literature has attributed this decline primarily to the exodus of white, educated men from religion. While it has received some scholarly attention in early apostasy research, we argue that the role of women, and in particular women’s participation in the labor force, is an understudied factor in explaining religious decline among both men and women. As a contribution to this research agenda, the present study uses data from the General Social Survey to model gender differences in apostasy. Using binary logistic regression, we show that among individuals who were raised in a religion, being employed is positively correlated with apostasy for women, while it has the opposite effect for men. We also show that for both men and women, being raised by a mother who was employed is associated with a higher likelihood of religious disaffiliation. The relationship between women’s employment and religious apostasy follows the assertion that economic and existential security is associated with weaker religious commitment, an effect that is present both among working women and the children of working mothers.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Siniša Zrinščak
Field #3. Giuseppe Giordan
Field #4. Faculty of Law, University of Zagreb
Field #5.
Field #6. Is it about Human Rights? Family Values, Sex/ Gender Issues, and Religion in Croatia and Italy
Field #7. The education reform in Croatia and Italy, two neighbouring European countries with the Catholic majority, has become a battlefield for opposing views on how the issues of gender, and sex education should be thought in public schools. Among main actors involved in public debates have been non-governmental organizations which, interestingly, have been increasingly using the human rights discourse. By analysing documents produced by eight prominent non-governmental organizations, two religious oriented and two secular oriented in each country, we analyse (1) if/how they use the human rights discourse, in particular related to parents’ rights, children rights and rights to express religious beliefs; (2) if/how they see the resolution of conflicting human rights; and (3) if/how they use discourse of values associated with religion and (non)traditional family in these debates. Particular attention will be devoted to (mis)use of selected ECtHR cases and how this can be analysed from the point of view of different social roles of Catholicism in two countries.
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Field #1. Religious authority, political participation, and the Internet
Field #2. Giulia Evolvi
Field #3.
Field #4. Ruhr University
Field #5.
Field #6. Catholic Leaders and Political Participation: a New Type of Internet Engagement
Field #7. Catholic-inspired groups recently became visible in Europe by organizing anti-gender demonstrations. They gather in public places and protest against the so-called “gender theory,” LGBTQ rights, and the expression of fluid gender and sexual identities. Groups such as La Manif Pour Tous (Demo for Everybody) in France and Sentinelle in Piedi (Standing Watchmen) in Italy are formally a-religious and independent from the Vatican. They also refuse hierarchical structures and traditional authorities, claiming to be spontaneous citizens’ gatherings organized through the Internet. However, they often rely on lay and informal authority figures that lead protests and frame dominant discourses. For example, the Italian Catholic journalist and author Costanza Miriano writes a popular blog (www.costanzamiriano.com) where she talks about anti-gender groups in Europe. Many anti-gender Catholics consider her a source of inspiration. Nonetheless, Miriano makes it clear that she respects the authority of the Pope and often refers to other pro-family movements, such as the Neocatechumenal Way. Through a qualitative analysis of the blog of Costanza Miriano and other prominent anti-gender websites in Italian and French, this paper discusses the emergence of informal Catholic figures in digital spaces. It argues that the Internet helps to make contemporary religion public in terms of political participation. Lay leaders increasingly gain popularity and establish a voice in the public sphere through the Internet. Therefore, religious change needs to be understood also in relation to the new communication possibilities offered by the Internet, which often result in the emergence of new voices in religious and political debates.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Lisa Ausic
Field #3.
Field #4. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Field #5.
Field #6. "It takes more than drumming!" - Pagan Practices and Ecological Citizenship in Glastonbury (UK)
Field #7. Studies of religion and ecology within the social sciences have extensively engaged with the ideas and attitudes of major religions and religious groups toward “nature”. However, alternative spiritualties and less institutionalized forms of faith, such as Pagan beliefs, have only recently received attention (Letcher 2003). Furthermore, only few have discussed interrelations of religious and environmental practices, and, if so, they have focused on rituals and socio-political activism. Hence, they have overlooked how alternative spiritual practices, such as Pagan Goddess worship, configure the realm of everyday life experiences and consumption at large. I instead highlight the intersections of alternative spiritualties, ecology and everyday life to show how the spiritualization of ecology is an everyday negotiation in religiosity. I ground my argument on my fieldwork in Glastonbury (UK) and elucidate how Pagans configure and negotiate their daily lives through a worship assemblage (DeLanda 2006) that entangles religious and environmental practices. Following this worship assemblage, I illustrate how Goddess worship forms a larger sociocultural network that consists of heterogeneous, interacting components. This network produces ecological citizenship via an assumed sacrality which is projected by (eco-)spiritual Pagan practices. Thereby, I demonstrate how sacrality, religiosity and ecology mutually contribute to each other and deliver the believers to an ecology of life. This approach follows religiosity and environmental practices along with each other within the larger sociocultural network where ecological citizenships emerge. Overall, I present the expressions of ecological concerns and citizenship of believers through the lens of worship and how this mode of worship encourages a political consciousness among Pagans. Literature DELANDA, M. (2006), A New Philosophy of Society: Assemblage Theory and Social Complexity, London, New York: Continuum. LETCHER, A. (2003), “'Gaia Told Me to Do It': Resistance and the Idea of Nature within contemporary British Eco-Paganism”, in: Ecotheology, Aug, 8(1), 61-84.
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Field #1. Regulating religious diversity. Politics, policies and strategies in the urban space
Field #2. Mariachiara Giorda
Field #3. Alberta Giorgi
Field #4. Università Roma Tre; Università di Bergamo
Field #5.
Field #6. Cities and their outskirts – forms of governance of religious diversity
Field #7. The processes of globalization and Europeanization contributed to reshaping both the government and the symbolic meaning of the territory. Sociology of religions increasingly focuses on urban settings, showing how the three logics of placement of religious communities in space (substitution, coexistence, overlapping) interact with the blurred line between the secular. Urban settings are in many cases characterized by interreligious interactions and innovative experiments of governance of religious diversity (i.e. multi-faith spaces). Focusing on four case studies in Italy, we show how the urban governance is in fact strictly related to what happens outside the city. First, we consider the complex dynamics of religious placing in the continuum “city-outskirts-countryside”, framing religious placement as the result of complex negotiations and as disciplinary power – the invisible or unproblematic religious traditions are allowed within the city boundaries, while the undesirable are pushed outside the city, and contend their space with the scattered pillars of religious excellence. Second, we take into account the role of municipalities in light of the government rescaling processes. In Italy the power game of placement is influenced by the absence of a framework law on religious freedom, which allows for a wide decisional discretion of municipal council. Therefore religious governance is highly politicized, and in fact it is hostage of the political tensions between different levels of governance. In this direction, we propose a typology of forms of religious governance in different territorial settings.
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Field #1. Well-being and Well-dying in medicalized longevity society: How do our religious culture consider the dignity of life and death?
Field #2. François-Julien Côté-Remy
Field #3. François-Julien Côté-Remy
Field #4. Université du Québec à Montréal
Field #5.
Field #6. Regards critiques sur la pathologisation de l’angoisse de mort en contexte de soins palliatifs
Field #7. Alors qu’elle était autrefois considérée comme une faiblesse morale ou religieuse, l’angoisse de mort est aujourd’hui appréhendée comme une maladie pouvant être évaluée, mesurée et traitée au même titre que n’importe quel autre trouble physique et/ou psychologique. En effet, dans les manuels de formation utilisés par les intervenants œuvrant dans les unités de soins palliatifs, certains « états spirituels » comme l’angoisse de mort sont associés à une spiritualité nocive justifiant « une intervention professionnelle » (Cherblanc, Jobin, 2012). Si cette réponse biomédicale au problème de l’angoisse de mort semble compatible avec les exigences du contexte séculier et des sciences naturelles (Jackson, 1977), elle a curieusement tendance à exclure les perspectives des sciences humaines. Convaincus que l’inclusion de regards sociologiques, historiques et philosophiques ne peut qu’être bénéfique pour les professionnels du soin, nous nous proposons de mettre au jour deux lacunes relatives à la « pathologisation de l’angoisse de mort », et ce, dans le but de fournir des solutions rationnelles mais non médicales (Lefève, 2015) aux phénomènes de la détresse spirituelle. Lesdites limites, auxquelles nous consacreront l’essentiel de notre propos, concernent a) la trajectoire chrétienne de la conception palliative du bien-mourir, laquelle nous semble inappropriée aux contextes de pluralisme religieux, et b) le physicalisme réductionniste (Lowe, 1999) dont les professionnels du soin font preuve en réduisant l’angoisse de mort à un trouble physico-psychologique, ignorant du même souffle ses dimensions culturelles, historiques et bien sûr religieuses.
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Field #1. Theoretical approaches to the social sciences from the field work on religion and spirituality in the global South
Field #2. Nicolas Viotti
Field #3. Nicolas Viotti
Field #4. CONICET
Field #5.
Field #6. Rethinking religious pluralism: a view from New Age Spirituality in Argentina
Field #7. Current dominant ideas on religious pluralism often consider the coexistence of different religions, as a consequence of a general process of individualization and the emergence of a “free choice” paradigm. This analysis usually understands religion as an institutional church organization, mostly focused on Catholicism and other Christian denominations, and shelves other forms of religious sociality as the case of New Age Spirituality as a “marginal”, “diffused”, “non-institutional” or “hybrid” religion. Moving away from the socio-institutional definition of religion the paper has two aims. Firstly, and instead of assuming individualization of religion as a teleological process (usually associated with privatization, diffused religion, and deinstitutionalization), the paper wants to discuss the concepts of religion and spirituality as theoretical categories that could be analyzed in a grounded and relational perspective. Based on the examples of current Argentinean political elites, the media and cultural industry, and holistic management of the self in public spaces (Hospitals, Prisons, and Schools), the paper wants to highlight that from a grounded perspective there is a strong religious social production of subjectivity, social bonds, and even institutional ties. Secondly, and considering this theoretical end empirical shift, the paper wants to reflect on how these could help us to rethink religious pluralism in a new perspective, including the current presence of New Age Spirituality not only in everyday life but also in the public milieu.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. James Richardson
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Nevada, Reno
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious Freedom, Politics, and Human Rights: Asylum Cases Involving the Church of the Almighty God
Field #7. Major controversies have arisen in the United States, in Europe, and in many other countries over how to deal with those seeking asylum from persecution in their home countries. The issue has caused political turmoil as demonstrated by the reaction to asylum cases adjudicated by the European Court of Human Rights, the court of last resort for citizens of 47 nations of the Council of Europe, and by controversies within the United States over immigration-related issues. This presentation will focus on a large subset of asylum cases involving several thousand members of the Church of the Almighty God (CAG) who have fled China and sought asylum claiming religious persecution in nearly two dozen countries. Simply being a member of the CAG in China is a criminal offense which can result in harsh penalties including incarceration and “reeducation”. These cases demonstrate the complicated politics of asylum seeking resulting from pressure Chinese authorities bring to bear on nations considering asylum for CAG members. This pressure from Chinese government coupled with domestic concerns over granting asylum has resulted in varying success for CAG asylum seekers. Reasons for the variation will be examined, along with the implications of this situation for religious freedom and human rights.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Inter-religious relations
Field #2. Clement Fumbo
Field #3.
Field #4. Teofilo Kisanji University
Field #5.
Field #6. Influences of Ndali traditions and its impact on African Christianity : a case of Moravian Church in Tanzania - Southern Province
Field #7. African Christianity over decades have been interwoven and built under traditions, cultures, customs and habits of people from the sending missions. However, the local traditions significantly have imperatively diverted the original course of the mission. As such in some cases mission work deemed impossible and liable to compromises with local customs and traditions on the ground. Initially, my focus in this study is to give a brief analysis on influences of the traditions of Ndali people to Moravian Church in Tanzania.. The aim is to analyse and give a short description of Ndali religion and its impact on Christianity in Southern part of Tanzania. It is a comparison study that utilizes ethnographical, ecological, anthropological and religion theories. The main research questions read, ‘What are influences of Ndali traditions in world religion (s) and what are the effects of those influences? What should be done to make a balance between them? The study expects immense variances between local and modern trends. Hence, similarities may be noticed viable for dialogue and contextual understanding. Therefore, the study will suggest, an open dialogue to achieve significant consensus without jeopardising either the good African values or Christian traditions that embrace family norms and community common good for our better world to live.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Bertrand Lavoie
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Sherbrooke
Field #5.
Field #6. Les professionnels de la santé comme acteurs de la laïcité : entre respect des normes institutionnelles et besoins des patients
Field #7. Au sein de plusieurs sociétés libres et démocratiques, les établissements de santé représentent des espaces où des interventions sont effectuées constamment avec des patients et leur famille, en tenant compte des besoins religieux de ceux-ci. Les différents professionnels de la santé dans un hôpital (infirmiers, médecins, administrateurs) doivent prendre des décisions quotidiennes concernant leurs pratiques d'harmonisation, lesquelles impactent la vie des patients et de leurs proches. Ces décisions sont de plusieurs ordres : aménagement de l'espace (lieux de culte), respect de restrictions alimentaires (hallal ou casher), mise à disposition d'aumônier, etc. Elles visent à garantir l'égale liberté de conscience et de religion des patients, quelles que soient leurs croyances religieuses. Bien que les balises (tant juridiques que médicales) devant être utilisées afin d'encadrer les pratiques de soins sont bien établies sur le plan institutionnel, les critères mobilisés au quotidien afin de les mettre en œuvre ne le sont pas et demeurent du ressort des professionnels de la santé. L’objectif de cette communication est de présenter des résultats provenant de travaux de recherche effectués au sein de milieux hospitaliers de deux régions de la province de Québec, au Canada (Estrie et Montréal), en mettant en lumière le rôle joué par des professionnels de la santé comme acteurs de la laïcité, ayant souvent à concilier d’une part un respect des normes institutionnelles et d’autre part les besoins religieux des patients.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The State and spiritual/religious healing processes in contemporary societies
Field #2. Rodrigo Toniol
Field #3. Rodrigo Toniol
Field #4. Unicamp
Field #5.
Field #6. World Health Organization and its ways to institute spirituality
Field #7. World Health Organization documents is as long-lasting as non explored, either by scholars identified with the field of health anthropology or by researchers in the social sciences of religion. This text is an attempt to reduce this gap. To do so, I analyze the minutes, official texts, transcripts of speeches, resolutions, and reports, and I reflect about how spirituality was enacted in the institution and, mainly, how this category has been articulated with other, such as culture, religion, rights, and wellbeing. The article has two main sections. First, I explain some of the questions related to the analysis of “spirituality” in the social sciences of religion and justify why this text can contribute to such debate. Secondly, I dwell on the documents analyzed, presenting them from two axes of variation: the spirituality of Others and the spirituality of All. On the conclusion I outline a set of empirical consequences associated with the “officialization of spirituality” in the WHO. Also, I point to directions that new analytical investments about this topic could follow.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Adam Possamai
Field #3. Giuseppe Giordan
Field #4. Western Sydney University
Field #5.
Field #6. The Branding of the Devil: A Sociology of Exorcism
Field #7. Working from the perspective of the sociology of contemporary religion, this article discusses the social construction of the phenomenon of exorcism, and how exorcism is located today in the current consumer culture, in which branding and differentiation are of social significance. It is argued that, within societies where religions compete with each other more and more, ministries of exorcism and deliverance have become part of this process of branding and differentiation. This thesis is then developed and tested by drawing on and analysing original data concerning the work of deliverance and exorcism documented by an experienced and philosophically-trained Catholic exorcist operating in southern Europe over a ten year period. On the basis of these original data, it is concluded that the Catholic Church had expanded the ministry of exorcism into the wider ministry of deliverance as a form of branding and differentiation, and as a clear counter-branding against charismatic Protestant movements.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Hybrid religious identities: methodological implications
Field #2. Cristina Gutiérrez Zúñiga
Field #3. Renée De la Torre
Field #4. Universidad de Guadalajara
Field #5.
Field #6. A typological proposal of hybrid identities in Mexico (ENCREER, 2016)
Field #7. Currently religions are not the only ones that produce religious beliefs and practices (Hervieu-Lèger, 2004), different secular or modernity agencies also produce, disseminate and offer scenarios where spiritualities and religiosities are practiced outside of churches and congregations (Piette, 1993). For this reason, it becomes increasingly necessary to go beyond religious belongings and attend to the transverse influences that generate identifications with beliefs, practices and values, in order to capture the hybridity of identities. For this, Roland Campiche, (1991) proposed to attend to religious self-identification, defined as "The process of self-definition in relation to the plurality of identity models proposed by religious institutions or other instances that produce religious" (Campiche, et al. al., 1992: 33). Based on this methodological proposal, the authors develop a typological exercise of Mexican believers based on data from the National Survey on Beliefs and Religious Practices (ENCREER, 2016) applied to a representative sample of the population. When analyzing the crossing of the question, “How do you identify yourself in religious terms (believers by tradition, believer by conviction, practicing believer, believer in your own way, spiritual but without church, non-practicing, agnostic, indifferent and atheist)?”against the profile of values, beliefs and practices, we sto detected certain collective patterns of belief and practice, objectivable in statistical behaviors, which allow us to approach the dynamics of religious identification with the identities of religious belonging.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The politics of religious diversity: the case of chaplaincy
Field #2. David Fagg
Field #3.
Field #4. Deakin University
Field #5.
Field #6. Christian Chaplains in Australian State Schools
Field #7. School chaplaincy in Australia is highly contentious, because the federal government funds a chaplaincy program in public schools. This funding, combined with Australia's secular education system and the declining significance of the Church, places Christian chaplains at the nexus of debates on the public role of religion. However, very little is known about the practice of school chaplains, nor about how they integrate their religious views with their youth work practice. Drawing on interviews with government-funded Christian chaplains in state secondary schools, as well as comparison interviews with other Christian youth workers, this paper explores: (1) the extent to which chaplaincy differs from other youth work performed by Christians; (2) how chaplains experience and respond to the public controversies surrounding their role; and (3) how they express their faith given a ban on proselytising. This paper finds that while the practice of chaplains does not differ significantly from other youth workers, they have developed a keen sense of the need to be "credible" workers because of the scrutiny they experience. They express their faith continually and in a generally theologically-informed manner, using "care" motifs to frame this expression. Despite the ban on proselytising, they have significantly more faith-related conversations with young people than other youth workers in the study, and connect young people with external Christian organisations more frequently than others in the study. This paper concludes by examining the policy implications of these findings.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Anne Keary
Field #3. Julie faulkner
Field #4. Monash University
Field #5.
Field #6. Stories that Memorabilia Tell: Mother-Daughter Conversations in a Catholic context
Field #7. Mother-daughter exchanges can be under-recognised in the light of other significant events in women’s lives. This presentation centres on memorabilia that pass among mothers and daughters, and the stories told and shared. The memorabilia represent an entry into a matrilineal past, with the women’s conversations providing meaning and guiding interpretations. Memorabilia constitute a web of relationships to the family, church and history. Perhaps, most importantly of all, they can reclaim a site for the mother-daughter relationship. In this study, extended longitudinal interviews offered a situated approach to locating the everyday practices of forty-five girls and women. Irigaray contends that “Between mother and daughter, interpose small handmade objects to make up for the losses of spatial identity, for intrusion into personal space” (p. 49). This intangible feminine space was uncovered in the mother-daughter conversations when the research participants were asked about objects and material items that had passed among them. For instance, I, Anne, have a wooden carving from Oberammergau, Germany of St Anne and her daughter Mary. This carving has passed from daughter to mother to daughter to (grand)daughter. It is a symbol, a sign of my female descendants, which constructs a spiritual and material site. The memorabilia discussed in this session provide insights into individual lives, but which together speak to a larger set of collective ideas.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Mathieu Gervais
Field #3.
Field #4. GSRL
Field #5.
Field #6. Musulman et paysan : construction d’une écologie musulmane ?
Field #7. Je souhaite présenter les premiers résultats d’une enquête en cours auprès de personnes qui portent et/ou mettent en œuvre des projets d’installation agricole tout en revendiquant et en affichant une identité de « musulman ». Les croisements entre islam et écologie d’une part (Folz, 2003) et ceux entre agriculture écologique d’autre part (Gervais, 2015) d’autre part, ont déjà été travaillés. Toutefois, il est marquant de voir la multiplication de réseaux de « permaculteurs musulmans » ou de « porteurs musulmans de projets agroécologiques ». Cette multiplication reflète l’intérêt générale de la communauté musulmane française envers l’écologie (verdissement de la religion) mais également la place nouvelle que prend la dimension spirituelle dans la motivation de pratiques agricoles écologiques. Ainsi, à travers l’étude du parcours d’installation de personnes revendiquant leur identité musulmane, je veux interroger l’existence d’une « culture de la nature » (Mathieu, 2016) musulmane. Ceci non pas pour décrire un lien univoque entre islam et écologie mais au contraire comme prétexte général à une étude de la façon dont religion et écologie se construisent dans un jeu de miroir propre à la situation contemporaine. Il s’agira concrètement de présenter le parcours d’installation comme une « carrière » militante et croyante au sein de laquelle l’individu se fait autant qu’il est fait (Darmont, 2008) et participe à la définition des termes « musulmans » et « agriculteur » au croisement des champs professionnels, militants et religieux dans la France contemporaine.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. Marie-Hélène Chevrier
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Strasbourg - UMR 7362 (LIVE)
Field #5.
Field #6. Migrants catholiques en France et espaces sacrés : l’enjeu de la visibilité
Field #7. Migration comme religion sont des réalités éminemment géographiques, impliquant des spatialités (lieux et pratiques) particulières. C’est par leur cristallisation dans l’espace qu’elles deviennent visibles et donc réellement existantes aux yeux des sociétés. La sécularisation influe directement sur le « régime de visibilité » (Lussault, 2003) des religions : celles-ci doivent tendre à l’invisibilité, leurs marqueurs spatiaux devant disparaître de l’espace public. Les pratiques et marqueurs spatiaux des migrants catholiques, fortement inculturés, plus ostentatoires, détonent souvent par rapport à cette invisibilisation progressive et les espaces sacrés français ne sont pas nécessairement configurés de manière à les faciliter. Il y a ainsi, pour les migrants catholiques voulant intégrer la communauté tout en conservant leurs particularités culturelles, un enjeu de reconnaissance, fortement spatial, et un paradoxe : celui de se rendre visibles au sein de l’Eglise –plus spécifiquement des églises – de France alors que celle-ci est contrainte par la sécularisation à devenir invisible. C’est ici le régime de visibilité des migrants catholiques qui sera étudié, à travers l’aménagement des lieux de cultes et la dimension spatiale des pratiques rituelles des migrants en leur sein. Le but de cette étude est d’éclairer le rôle que joue l’appropriation spatiale de l’espace sacré par les migrants dans leur intégration sociale, mais aussi dans le renouvellement de la visibilité du catholicisme local dans l’espace public. Cette étude s’appuie sur le cas des sanctuaires de Fourvière (Lyon) et de la rue du Bac (Paris), points d’ancrage importants des migrants catholiques originaires des sociétés africaines, créoles, asiatiques et latino-américaines.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments
Field #2. Marta Kołodziejska
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences
Field #5.
Field #6. From spirituality to the spirit of capitalism - the transformation of mindfulness practices in the digital age.
Field #7. This study is an empirical investigation of how the meaning, function, and value of mindfulness practices is transformed through the narrative of the Headspace mobile meditation app. Deploying mixed methods, it is argued that mindfulness, as conceptualized by the narrative of the app, becomes a secularized, individualized form of mental and physical exercise/practice, explicitly and implicitly aimed at enhancing productivity, and improving health and wellbeing. Deploying the concepts of disciplinary power by Michel Foucault and Nikolas Rose, it will be argued that mindfulness becomes a medicalized form of training and a tool for self-management, which locates it among contemporary disciplinary practices. The concurrent medicalization of the body and mind, their ailments, qualities and features, as well as the positioning of mindfulness as part of modern science present in Headspace narratives, harness it for the purposes of neoliberal capitalism, and more specifically, the corporate environment.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion in Comics
Field #2. Andreas Häger
Field #3. Ralf Kauranen
Field #4. Åbo Akdemi University
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion in Nordic autobiographical comics
Field #7. Autobiography is a vital genre in the contemporary comics field. This paper looks at religion in autobiographical comics/graphic novels in a Nordic context. The material includes works by Kaisa Leka on her encounters with Hinduism in Finland and the US and by Thomas Arnroth on his time as a member of a neopentecostal congregation in Sweden. A common theme in autobiographical comics is the role of a particular trauma and how this is dealt with. Another theme could be described as "coming out". We see both of these in Nordic autobiographical comics on religion. A third widespread theme is reflection both on one's own life but also on existential and religious matters. The paper looks at religion in autobiographical comics through these three topics: religious experiences as traumatic; coming out as religious or non-religious; and reflections on religion, one's own or more generally. The paper attempts to answer two questions: what is the role of religion in the reflexive identity work and the "presentation of self" of the comic artists in these autobiographical works?; and what does this say about the place of religion, and particularly the "religions of difference" dealt with in these works, in a contemporary secularized Nordic society?
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Guy BUCUMI
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Sherbrooke
Field #5.
Field #6. Les évangéliques, Nouveaux acteurs des laicités africaines. Cas de l'Afrique francophone
Field #7. La « vague » de démocratisation de la décennie 1990 en Afrique francophone a permis l’adoption de nouvelles lois fondamentales, calquées toutes sur la constitution française de 1958, que les constituants africains ont pris pour modèle. Elles ont ainsi adopté le principe de laïcité, dans le même esprit du constituant français, car c’est avec ce modèle que les constituants africains avaient plus de familiarité et de proximité ; il leur apparaissait comme « le meilleur gage pour la sauvegarde d’un climat de paix et de tolérance » ( Berthé 17:29). Le processus démocratique a également permis un pluralisme religieux qui a favorisé l’implantation des églises évangéliques notamment, qui connaissent depuis, une diffusion très rapide. Le succès grandissant du courant évangélique et sa proximité avec les pouvoirs politiques prend aujourd’hui une importance croissante. En effet, il y a là une situation nouvelle, récente, en mutation rapide et qui remet en question bien de questions politiques, institutionnelles, juridiques et sociales. Cette situation a revivifié les débats sur la laïcité et sur le modèle qui convient aux sociétés africaines en tenant compte de la forte religiosité qui les caractérise. Le courant évangélique se retrouve ainsi au cœur d’un débat de société de plus en plus récurrent sur la gestion cultuelle par les pouvoirs publics. La configuration actuelle du champ religieux en Afrique fait des leaders évangéliques, des interlocuteurs privilégiés des pouvoirs publics sur diverses questions de société dont la laïcité, qu’ils contestent et diabolisent.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religious Diversity and Political Conflict in Europe
Field #2. Anastas Odermatt
Field #3. Antonius Liedhegener
Field #4. University of Lucerne
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious Diversity and Political Conflict in Europe – a Relationship?
Field #7. Since the turn of the century, religion has become a heavily disputed topic across Europe. Inner state conflicts about religion became a widespread phenomenon. In particular, Muslim minorities and their religious needs and collective practices are contested issues of public policy. The hypothesis of this paper is this: the more religiously diverse a given societies becomes, the more likely is the occurrence of social and political conflicts related to religion in a given European country. Following the basic assumptions of Social Identity Theory (SIT), religious pluralisation should lead to more salient in-group-outgroup distinctions resulting in a greater probability of societal conflicts on religion. Building the independent variable religious diversity from the Swiss Metadatabase of Religious Affiliation in Europe (SMRE), the main challenge of this empirical analysis is to operationalize the dependent variable religious conflict. Concerning the measurement of religious conflict in the European context, the central requirement is to develop a fine-grained measure. Usually conflict studies concentrate on upheaval or violence. For religious conflict in Europe, we need a measure ranging from low profile every-day social conflicts to political conflicts and violent events. Thus, depending on the data, appropriate types of conflicts have to be defined. This should result in a single measure of religious conflictivity useful for all countries under investigation. The paper presents the existing different strands of research on religious conflict in Europe, offers a new approach to operationalise the two basic concepts religious diversity and religious conflict and presents first results on statistical models by multiple linear regression analysis including various controls for third varibles.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religious authority, political participation, and the Internet
Field #2. Yoel Cohen
Field #3.
Field #4. School of Communication, Ariel University, Israel
Field #5.
Field #6. Internet, Religious Authority, & Religious Clerics: a case study in Israeli Rabbis
Field #7. The research study examines how Israeli rabbis have encountered the technological changes in the new media. It draws upon a survey of Israeli rabbis carried out by the author in 2018. 330 filled questionnaires were received. The survey found that all rabbis use the computer for preparing Torah shiurim (religious lessons). In addition, Conservative and modern Orthodox rabbis, and half of Haredi leumi rabbis (a stricter form of modern Orthodox) use the computers for finding solutions to Jewish legal questions in contrast to only one-sixth of ultra orthodox Haredi rabbis and one fifth of Reform rabbis. However, the extent to which rabbis have incorporated information technology in their professional work is limited. With the exception of Conservative rabbis, rabbis from other streams are not inclined to surf the Net for even basic Jewish-related functional information - such as information about daily times for Jewish religious prayer, times for the commencement and termination of the Sabbath and other holydays, as well as functional information required by community rabbis such as kosher product information, and Jewish schools etc. Even blogging - a valuable means for a rabbi to preach on-line -- has been little adopted among Orthodox rabbis. In conclusion, while all rabbis possess a computer, the picture regarding Internet is more diverse. A closer look shows that all orthodox rabbis have far from maximised the potential which media technology offers in pastoral theology.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion and Bioethics
Field #2. Lise Eriksson
Field #3.
Field #4. Uppsala University
Field #5.
Field #6. Bioethical Evaluation of Changing Kinship Norms: a Comparison of Surrogacy and Uterine Transplantation
Field #7. This paper explores bioethical evaluation of gestational surrogacy and uterine transplants in medical knowledge production. The paper studies through critical discourse analysis how surrogacy and uterine transplantation are discussed and compared in four Nordic medical journals. Particular attention is given to representations of religion and religious views on kinship. Religions are represented as traditional, e.g. through distinction between uterine transplantation as the new method and surrogacy as the old Biblical method. Gestational surrogacy and uterine transplantation involve reassessment of traditional kinship norms, particularly the role of biogenetic kinship. For example, both reproductive technologies may contribute to the ‘reversal of linear descent’ (Thompson 2005) by involving grandmothers as surrogates or uterus donors. This study focuses on Sweden as a pioneer on uterine transplants and Finland as an early implementer of altruistic gestational surrogacy. Uterine transplants in Sweden and gestational surrogacy in Finland are positioned in medical articles as bio-intimate acts of compassion between family members or friends.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Olga Breskaya
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Padova, Italy
Field #5.
Field #6. Towards a Social Perception of Religious Freedom: Measuring the Effects of Religiosity and Spirituality
Field #7. The empirical study of religious freedom is not given sufficient attention by sociologists of religion even though the conditions for and implications of the governance of religious freedom are very important in the social scientific study of religion. The paper introduces the conceptualization of religious freedom for the quantitative study of social perceptions of religious freedom (SPRF). The suggested model aims to clarify whether ongoing transformation processes in the four fields – socio-religious, judicial, religious governance, and human rights – determine or reflect SPRF. The primary objective of a new conceptualization and measurement of SPRF is to examine the relationship between those conceptual domains of religious freedom that clarify its societal value and meaning under the conditions of high levels of cultural and religious diversity. Testing the elaborated measuring instrument, the results of the effects of religiosity, spirituality, and religious socialization on SPRF for young people in Italy (N = 1000) are presented. Considering the argument that the concept of spirituality emerges into the sociological ambit of religion from the context of contemporary pluralism, the author will bring the evidence how the perception of religious freedom is formed by people who are spiritual but not religious, who adhere to minority religions, who adhere to majority religions, or who are religious ‘nones.’
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Congregations in Europe (Thematic)
Field #2. Hilke Rebenstorf
Field #3.
Field #4. Social Sciences Institute of the EKD
Field #5.
Field #6. Requirements and Effects of Parish Involvement in Local Civil Society – Results from a German Case Study
Field #7. In recent years the civil society discourse put an emphasis on religious organizations, and this not only in the US, but also in Europe that has been dominated for centuries by state churches. Considering civil society as the genuine place for churches today reflects profound changes: a civil society actor emerged from a formerly para-state institution. Parishes became more active by taking part in public discourse, taking political positions etc. However, activity within a wider environment alone does not transform a parish into a civil society actor. Local civil societies are formed by networks of civil society organizations, institutions, initiatives and the like. The question therefore is: what is needed to present oneself and to be perceived by others as a reliable partner? A qualitative study within the municipal area of six protestant parishes in Germany indicates, that (1) civil society involvement is a matter of material resources but also of division of labor and of shared responsibility of pastors and volunteers; (2) recognition as a civil society actor depends less on the proportion of church members in an area, but on the activities that must fit in with the area; (3) acceptance of the particularly religious notion of a congregations’ civil society involvement seems to depend mainly on the self-perception of the congregation as a religious organization, and less on the religiousness of the environment; (4) religious vitality corelates with the general vitality of an area and is not merely a function of the activity level of a congregation.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Frédéric Dejean
Field #3.
Field #4. Université du Québec à Montréal
Field #5.
Field #6. Du bon usage du « zonage religieux » : pratiques urbanistiques et orientations politiques dans l’accès à l’espace des groupes religieux minoritaires à Montréal
Field #7. La présence des groupes religieux minoritaires dans l’espace urbain se traduit par l’aménagement de lieux de culte ou d’espaces cultuels. À Montréal, comme dans d’autres métropoles occidentales, nous assistons de façon concomitante à la conversion de bâtiments religieux historiques (quand il ne s’agit pas tout simplement de leur destruction) et à une forte demande de locaux de la part de groupes religieux qui ne s’installent plus dans des bâtiments clairement identifiés comme « religieux », du fait notamment d’une architecture caractéristique, mais privilégient des bâtiments existants (anciens commerces, bureaux, ateliers ou hangars). Cette nouvelle géographie cultuelle a pour effet de contraindre les arrondissements montréalais – de même que les municipalités liées – à développer des outils réglementaires qui soient en phase avec elle. Notre communication vise à montrer comment ces outils ne font pas qu’accompagner une évolution, mais qu’ils en sont également des producteurs. Aussi, ils traduisent différentes attitudes à l’endroit des groupes religieux et de leur place dans le tissu urbain, de sorte que les orientations urbanistiques sont également porteuses de valeurs politiques. Nous appuierons le propos sur les démarches entreprises par plusieurs arrondissements de Montréal qui intègrent la question du « zonage religieux » dans leurs préoccupations.
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Field #1. Criminalization of religion in contexts of authoritarian democracies: a compared perspective from Latin America and the Middle-East
Field #2. André Corten
Field #3.
Field #4. UQAM
Field #5.
Field #6. Criminalisation de l’homosexualité vs criminalisation de l’homophobie dans les populations déplacées latino-américaines
Field #7. Les homosexuels sont vus dans certains milieux populaires latino-américains comme possédés par des esprits du mal comme les orixas et loas sont vus dans les milieux populaires comme des esprits. Dans les déplacements de population, homosexualité et l’homophobie suscitent des réactions diverses. En général, les « déjà-là » sont davantage pris par les préjugés, mais évitent les confrontations. Au contraire, les nouveaux arrivants se divisent en deux orientations. La première est celle qui exagère leurs tendances homophobiques combinées à leur prosélytisme – moyen qu’ils ont de s’adapter à leur nouveau cadre de vie - , la seconde est d’inventer de nouvelles manières de concevoir leur rapport à ce qu’ils voient comme des esprits du mal. Malgré leurs oppositions, l’homosexualité et l’homophobie leur donnent, à travers leurs croyances aux esprits, un monde en commun. Les positions variées et complexes se traduisent par des tentatives des parlementaires brésiliens de proposer des projets de loi sur la criminalisation de l’homophobie ou sur des « thérapies de conversion » proposées aux homosexuels.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Ali Qadir
Field #3. Tatiana Tiaynen-Qadir
Field #4. University of Tampere
Field #5.
Field #6. Decolonizing spirit, decolonizing agency: Ecology, artifact, and music in the global margins
Field #7. This paper contributes to decolonization of knowledge by arguing that many categories which scholars of religion use are located in processes of colonization, and that particular attention should be paid to concepts implicitly swept into those categories. One such category that has been expelled from explanatory frameworks of sociology of religion is “spirit,” and this exclusion entails a specification of who or what can have “agency.” In this paper we show that spirit, a momentous category for many peoples, can be recovered from the margins of methodology by critiquing the colonial assumptions in the concept of agency. We unpack three domains important to sacrality — ecology, artifact, and music — from which spirit has been banished in modern, colonial epistemic regimes by defining agency in a particular way. We illustrate the argument by drawing on our long-term empirical research in three regions of the Global South and East where spirit is an important category intimately tied to these three terms, although recognizing this significance calls for a reworking of the colonized concept of agency. Our cases are anthropogenic, Amazonian indigenous black earth (terra preta) amongst indigenous Peruvians (ecology), Marian icons amongst Russian Orthodox faithful (artifact), and devotional Qawwalis amongst South Asian Muslims (music). We thus point to limitations in contemporary sociological theories that miss much by excluding the category of spirit because they refuse to acknowledge cultural differences in the associated concept of agency. (Ali Qadir, Tatiana Tiaynen-Qadir, & Frederique Apffel-Marglin)
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Elizabeth Sperber
Field #3. Elizabeth Sperber
Field #4. University of Denver
Field #5.
Field #6. The co-evolution of African political and religious movements: A comparative historical analysis to contextualize African Born Again Christian movements
Field #7. Either implicitly or explicitly, much scholarship on religion in the public sphere examines how religious identities and institutions affect political and civic life. In this literature, the causal arrow generally runs from religion to politics. By contrast, this paper joins a growing literature in sociology, anthropology and political science that reverses the question, and considers how political institutions and identities and religious movements have iteratively influenced each other. Specifically, this paper focuses on four sub-Saharan African states since the 1950s, and examines the processes through which the region’s dynamic and varied Christian movements have evolved in tandem with dominant social and political institutions. Understanding the iterative processes through which African religious and political movements shape one other is critical given the rapid and unforeseen rise of competitive born again Christian movements in many sub-Saharan states, and their apparent entanglement with antidemocratic reform, restrictions on religious freedom, and new forms of clientelism. Comparative historical analysis of the intertwined evolution of African religious and political movements is necessary, I argue, to understand how today’s rapidly growing Pentecostal and Charismatic churches relate to processes of democratic backsliding and its possible alternatives.
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Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Rosemary Hancock
Field #3.
Field #4. The University of Notre Dame Australia
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion and race in urban grassroots politics: Comparing Australia and the United States
Field #7. This paper applies the emerging literature on the intersection of religion and race to an empirical study of religious engagement in urban grassroots politics in Australia and United States. The ascription of particular characteristics as ‘natural’ or ‘inherent’ to particular religious communities constructs racialized religious identities, and the construction of these racialized identities in grassroots political spaces can occur in subtle ways. The paper explores some of the ways in which religion and race intersect in two urban grassroots community organisations with diverse religious participation – one in Sydney, Australia and one in Chicago, the United States – and the ways in which such intersections both feed into and challenge constructions of local community and ‘ideal’ and ‘problematic’ citizens.
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Francis Lim
Field #3.
Field #4. Sociology, Nanyang Technological University
Field #5.
Field #6. Atheist Secularization and Ideological Disguise: Religion’s Public Role in Contemporary China
Field #7. Contemporary China offers an intriguing case of religion’s public role in an officially atheist communist country: a religious revival in the public domain in an authoritarian state embracing “atheist secularism”. Is this indicative of a “fallacy” of secularization theory, or are there more complex processes at play? This paper first examines the practices of atheist secularization in China and how the government has actively appropriated religious symbolism and mobilized religious groups for its own political agenda. Next, I use the concept of “ideological disguise” to analyze the case of a Christian development NGO, the GMV (pseudonym), in its ability to pursue a public role in China. GMV’s ideological disguise entails downplaying, and even publicly disavowing, its religious messages and intent in its development work while interacting with the government and general public. For the government, the practice of ideological disguise involves the insistence on the “secular” or “non-religious” dimension of GMV’s community development work, and downplaying or publicly ignoring the fact that community development workers may be religiously motivated in the conduct of their activities. This mutual practice of ideological disguise is further bolstered when the religious NGO and the government make reference to the discursive practice of “holistic development”, currently hegemonic in the global development industry. Overall, the analysis suggests that religion’s persistent public role in a communist regime like China is less a “failure” of secularization process than the paradoxical and logical consequence of it.
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Field #1. Current Concerns in Parish and Congregational Research
Field #2. Philip Hughes
Field #3.
Field #4. Alphacrucis College
Field #5.
Field #6. The Political Implications of Volunteering by Religious Attenders
Field #7. There is considerable political debate in Australia about the benefits from the public purse enjoyed by religious organisations, particularly by way of tax concessions, and, at the local level, concessions in relation to rates. The major argument has been around the extent to which religious organisations contribute to the wellbeing of the communities in which they exist. One part of that debate has focussed on whether the volunteering that is done by religious people contributes to the overall wellbeing of the community, or whether it is mostly done for the benefit of the members of their religious organisation. This paper draws on data from a national survey conducted in 2016 to examine this question. The survey examined both the informal and formal volunteering done by religious attenders and compared it with non-attenders, and the extent to which that volunteering was designed to benefit the members of the religious organisation or the benefit of the wider community. The results of the survey will be explored and the implications of the findings from this survey for the debate about the benefits religious organisations receive from the public purse will be considered.
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Field #1. The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments
Field #2. Torkel Brekke
Field #3.
Field #4. Peace Research Institute Oslo
Field #5.
Field #6. Muslim consumer citizenship
Field #7. Sociologists of religion often argue that with globalization and neoliberalism forms of citizenship have converged onto a market model of passive consumer citizenship. However, to many Muslims in the West religiously inflected consumption is an answer to questions about citizenship, identity and belonging more relevant in everyday life than participation in traditional political and civic organizations and networks. The marketization of Islamic goods and services across many sectors is growing rapidly across the globe and consumption is emerging as a key mode of Muslimness. Research about Muslims and citizenship in the West needs to take the market and consumption more seriously. This paper wants to challenge sociology to understand the development of Muslim consumer citizenship, an active expression of belonging that is both locally grounded and globally networked. The paper uses quantitative and qualitative data from a large research project (FINEX) about Islamic finance and economics in the Nordic countries as point of departure to discuss questions about the relationships between consumption, citizenship, identity and belonging of Muslims in Western and non-Western societies.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Current Concerns in Parish and Congregational Research
Field #2. Robert Dixon
Field #3.
Field #4. Australian Catholic University & University of Divinity
Field #5.
Field #6. Mass attenders’ attitudes to the clergy sexual abuse crisis in Australia
Field #7. News of the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church in Australia began to emerge in the early 1990s, when a few isolated cases of abuse by priests became known. The crisis continued to escalate until, in 2013, the then Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, established a Royal Commission to investigate sexual abuse of children in institutions generally, including the Catholic Church. After five years of inquiry, the Royal Commission delivered its comprehensive report in December 2017. The section of the report dealing with the Catholic Church is close to 800 pages long, and reveals that a total of 1,880 priests and religious were credibly accused of having committed abuse during the period 1950 to 2010. Every five years since 1996, as part of the 1996 Catholic Church Life Survey (CCLS) and then the National Church Life Survey (NCLS) (2001-2016), a national random sample of Mass attenders has been asked questions about the crisis, resulting in five comparable datasets. The questions concern attenders’ attitudes towards Church authorities, their respect for clergy and religious, whether they think the media has been fair to the Church in reporting the crisis, and their assessment of the Church’s response. This paper will investigate how the attitudes of Mass attenders have changed over time as the extent and seriousness of the crisis has grown, and how they vary according to variables such as age, sex, country of birth and orthodoxy of Catholic belief.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Theoretical approaches to the social sciences from the field work on religion and spirituality in the global South
Field #2. Megan Robertson
Field #3.
Field #4. University of the Western Cape
Field #5.
Field #6. Performance and Production in the Field: Examining queer approaches to participatory research through the case of queer clergy in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa
Field #7. Scholarship focusing on Christianity and queer sexualities has progressed from an exclusive emphasis on queering abstract heteronormative policies and theologies to queering the material lived experiences of queer Christians. Research on queer lived experiences has commonly explored the complexities of negotiating spirituality and sexuality within the context of religious, cultural and political debates around same-sex marriage and the ordination of queer people. Recently, research has also focused on the transformative power of queer people in challenging normative church practices and theologies. However, there has been limited discussion in scholarship which has queered the ways in which the researcher, the researched, and the context of the field co-produce the data which serves as illustrative of these negotiating and transformative lived experiences. Through exploring the lived experiences of queer clergy in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa, I examine how my intersecting racial, gendered, and religious identifications along with those of my participants produce certain narratives while disrupting others. Informed by feminist standpoint and queer theory, I analyse how my use of ethnographic interviews and observation can be understood as active parts of the production of people’s experiences. I explore the ways in which the field can become a site of identity performance and narrative production and how the immediate and distant socio-political contexts affects (and is affected by) these performances and productions. I posit that this queer and intersectional lens of examining the field holds the possibility of generating nuanced understandings of the experiences and narratives of those Othered by power.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Jonatan Garcia Rabadan
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU)
Field #5.
Field #6. Être citoyen et catholicisme à Biscaye (Pays Basque)
Field #7. Citoyenneté et Participation politique sont deux concepts fondamentaux des sociétés démocratiques ; ils ont même une très forte liaison entre eux. Pour cette raison, et comme différentes enquêtes ont montré l’impact du facteur religieux sur elles, cet article veut mettre l'accent sur le sens de d'être un bon citoyen/une bonne citoyenne. Celui qui participe aux élections? Celui qui n'échappe pas aux impôts? Ou, celui qui appartient à une association? Pour une meilleure compréhension de cette réalité, elle sera comparée à travers trois groupes différents, prenant comme référence le territoire de la Biscaye (Pays Basque). Ces groupes sont la population de Biscayenne, les fidèles catholiques du territoire et les personnes intégrées dans les mouvements et les communautés laïques catholiques dans ce diocèse. Précisément, ce dernier groupe - hétérogène et pluriel - n’a pas reçu suffisamment d’attention du monde universitaire, même s’il s’agissait d’un collectif ayant des caractéristiques très propres ; même dans leur manière de vivre de la foi et sa présence dans l’espace publique. La question directrice de cet article est la suivante: la religion catholique au Pays Basque influence-t-elle la compréhension de ce que signifie être citoyen/citoyenne?
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Treating the Dead in the Aboriginal Worlds at the Age of Religious Pluralism
Field #2. Jean Frederic de Hasque
Field #3.
Field #4. UCLouvain
Field #5.
Field #6. Le corps du lion costumé et les mains gantées « Je me ferai enterrer en Lion ».
Field #7. Il ne s’agit pas par cette présentation d’aborder et de décrire un monde autochtone, mais un cercle associatif qui affirme son autonomie en se panafricanisant. Il s’agirait donc d’une autochtonie dans l’acception de Geschiere (2009) associant une revendication du sol à la réappropriation d’un point de vue politique. Les dirigeants africains du cercle prennent grand soin de leurs défunts qu’ils exfiltrent d’ailleurs de leur famille lignagère par leur présence ostensible lors des cérémonies mortuaires. Les morts vont servir le projet d’autonomie du Lions Clubs africain en montrant que le club est une nouvelle famille. Elle se construit contre l’extérieur, c’est-à-dire en se démarquant des clubs non africain du Lions Clubs International présent sur les cinq continents, mais aussi contre les Africains qui ne sont pas membres. En septembre 2011, j’assiste à l’enterrement d’un membre du Lions Clubs Béninois, il y occupait de hautes fonctions, en tant que médecin il dirigeait une oeuvre caritative médicale d’envergure nationale. En accompagnant un délégation du club à la chapelle ardente au domicile du défunt, et ensuite lors de la messe d’enterrement je constaterai que le décès d’un des leurs est l’occasion de : -montrer l’emprise sur le corps d’un défunt par une association privée -d’affirmer l’existence d’une deuxième famille, la première étant celle du lignage. Ce premier « terrain mortuaire » me fera recueillir des données ultérieures auprès d’autres membres de l’association et plusieurs d’entre eux me diront que, « comme le Lion Bruno ils se feront enterrer en uniforme ». Le défunt exposé dans la chapelle ardente est revêtu de son uniforme ce qui permet au club de supplanter la première famille. En occupant littéralement le terrain lorsqu’ils s’inclinent vêtu du même uniforme que le défunt, devant sa dépouille. Ils l’entourent en formant un cercle, les mains gantées de blanc, adoptant un rite maçonnique, et ensuite accompagnent la levée du corps par une haie d’honneur. Celle-ci est effectuée dans l’espace public, dans la rue devant la maison, toisant le voisinage qui considère bien souvent les Lions comme des sorciers. Le même dispositif se met en branle à l’église (dans le cas de ce Lion catholique), où les membres qui sont costumés et décorés s’imposent au premier rang, à la vue de la première famille, mais aussi du public de fidèles. Sans nier la première famille, avec laquelle l’association est en contact et dont elle respecte les prescriptions concernant par exemple dernières volontés du mort, les Lions ne cessent de revendiquer leur place. Pour ce faire, ils ne jouent pas la carte de la discrétion, au contraire, comme ils me le diront, bien que je constatais une réprobation muette des proches, « la famille est fière que nous sommes là, et l’est encore plus quand toi tu filmes! ». Les morts sont une occasion d’affirmer l’existence d’un cercle qui est plus qu’un lieu de business, en montrant les liens qui unissent les membres et l’assistance mutuelle qu’ils se procurent au delà de leur présence physique. La disparition d’un des leurs offre également une fenêtre médiatique qui vise à recruter de nouveaux membres, en s’infiltrant dans un protocole religieux (assister la mine sérieuse et bien habillé à une cérémonie, catholique ou musulmane au Bénin) fréquenté par des non membres. Le club y véhicule sa « modernité », celle d’une association fréquentée par des managers riches et pragmatiques rompus aux codes occidentaux mais qui respectent également les prescrits religieux et les codes coutumiers. Enfin, au sein du club, les morts les plus illustres sont régulièrement invoqués, leurs actes sont rappelés lors des réunions mensuelles. Le récit de leur travail et de leur engagement associatif en fait des êtres de référence, leur mémoire est ainsi perpétuée par des visites et des prises de vue effectuées au pied de leurs sépultures par les dirigeants d’envergure continentale. Ils réaffirment de cette manière les liens unissant les Lions vivant ou mort. Biblio Peter Geschiere The Perils of Belonging Autochthony,Citizenship, and Exclusion in Africa and Europe, university of Chicago Press and London, 2009.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Younes Saramifar
Field #3.
Field #4. ULB
Field #5.
Field #6. God under bedsheets: biopolitics of Islamist militancy and Sexual Subjectivity of Shia Muslims in the Middle East
Field #7. Feminists scholarship foregrounds the role and agency of women within religious forums to challenge the reductive dismissal attitude toward religion as mere patriarchal construct. Some feminist studies of religion highlight how the religion is a lived phenomenon that provides possibilities of empowerment for women but simultaneously it becomes an oppressive means as well (Scott 2009, Braidotti 2008). Mahmood (2005) showed that women’s agency is even expressed within conservative religious settings. She and others (see Avishai 2008) stressed that agency is at work even in compliance and religious piety. They specially promoted ‘what “religion” is and means to women’ (Nayhagen 2017). However, these approaches overlook how masculinities and sexual subjectivities of pious Muslim men are configured in militarized settings. Therefore, I trace how militant conservative masculinities and womanhood co-constitute each other in the reactionary politics of Middle Eastern armed resistance movements. I revisit the meanings of masculinities and sexual subjectivities among Shia volunteer militants based on my ethnographic research among Iranian, Iraqi, Lebanese volunteer militants. These militants are recruited and trained by militia organizations such as Basij (in Iran), Hezbollah (in Lebanon) and Hashd ul Shaabi (in Iraq). These men were instrumental in the war against ISIS. They receive both ideological and military trainings which produce a regime of biopolitics that strive to regulate sexual subjectivities of militants both at homes and streets. I have interviewed the militants, observed their trainings and compared their attitudes and their partners attitude both in sexual-private-spheres and military-public-spheres toward scared and sexuality. The biopolitics of militancy operates through physical trainings, instructions in rituals and prayers as well as classes about sexual conducts and family planning. The trainings and recruitment campaigns are practices of regulating sexual subjectivities through religious worldviews and Islamist militancy. The trainings target all aspects of volunteers’ lives from bedrooms till streets, from private till public. Accordingly, I will explain perceptions of how those practices are accepted and appropriated within the households of Shia militants. I will demonstrate socio-sexual linkages of private and public spheres among those Shia men who prove their religious commitments by volunteering to join militias.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Spiritual transformation and political engagement
Field #2. Michael Nollert
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Fribourg
Field #5.
Field #6. Ties that bind and radicalize: How Muslim converts join the Jihad
Field #7. Most converts to Islam in Western countries are marginal men (Park 1928) of their respective societies. Hence, they rather concentrate on their new religious practice and belief than on political activities. However, some converts opt for engaging in political organizations in order to promote inter-faith dialog or to give voice to their new faith-community. Moreover, some are even attracted to militant practices and consider the violent Jihad as a legitimate instrument for establishing a territorially limited or even global theocracy. Although this phenomenon is a marginal one, it is a fact that converts are over-represented in the jihadist scene (Van Ginkel and Entenmann 2016). The paper deals with the question of how Muslim converts learn and internalize extremist goals. Given the relevance of social networks for conversion (Lofland and Stark 1965; Jindra 2014) as well as for expansion of Jihadism (Sageman 2004), the paper draws on the sociological network theory (Everton 2015), comparative research findings and author’s own research to find answers to the above-mentioned question. The paper concludes that the radicalization of converts can be traced back to a myriad of factors including converts’ longing for community, their age, their consumption of Islamist web content, and their being embedded in fundamentalist networks, be it Salafist friends, radical imams, Jihadi acquaintances in prisons, or study visits to Arab countries.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Field perspective and reverse angle: Politics of fieldwork in religious contexts
Field #2. Hicham Benaissa
Field #3.
Field #4. GSRL
Field #5.
Field #6. Enquêter sur l’islam français : les obstacles au métier de sociologue
Field #7. Prendre pour étude, un objet traitant de près ou de loin de « l’islam français », constitué publiquement comme un « problème social », c’est s’exposer à reproduire dans son analyse ce qui est présupposé dans les représentations collectives (Bourdieu, Passeron). L’islam étant un objet social qui fait problème, prenons alors pour objet d’étude le problème que pose l’islam, ou construisons notre problématique qu’en référence au problème social qu’il pose. Sans compter que « l’islam » est un « objet chaud » (Jean Leca), à la source de différentes luttes politiques et symboliques, conduisant presque mécaniquement, à l’accusation du parti-pris idéologique. Et cette accusation redouble dès lors qu’on entretient avec son objet une relation familiale ou familière. Ces effets sociaux puissants d’impositions de problématiques, nous avons eu à les ressentir tout le long de notre travail de recherche (construction de l’objet, relation enquêteur-enquêté, relation doctorant-directeur de thèse, colloques, séminaires, etc.). C’est pourquoi, à partir de notre propre expérience, nous souhaiterions montrer qu’une sociologie de l’islam français ne peut se faire sans une sociologie de la sociologie de l’islam, c’est à dire sans une réinterogation radicale des effets théoriques (héritage conceptuel), institutionnels (champ disciplinaire) et sociaux (problèmes publics) exercés sur cet objet.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Pierre Bréchon
Field #3.
Field #4. Institut d'érudes politiques
Field #5.
Field #6. La religion des Français. Evolutions de 1981 à 2018 d’après les données de la European Values Study (EVS)
Field #7. Tous les neuf ans, la European Values Study permet de mesurer le degré et les formes de religiosité dans les différents pays européens. Cette communication présentera les résultats de 2018 comparés aux vagues antérieures. Elle prolonge les analyses présentées dans Bréchon Pierre, Gonthier Frédéric, Astor Sandrine (direction). La France des valeurs. Quarante ans d’évolution, Presses universitaires de Grenoble, coll. Politique en plus, avril 2019. Le trait le plus saillant est la continuelle progression des sans religion et des athées convaincus au détriment de la religion majoritaire catholique, ce qui traduit pour l’essentiel un phénomène générationnel. Les croyances semblent mieux se maintenir que les appartenances et les pratiques, mais elles deviennent de plus en plus flottantes et il est difficile parfois de bien appréhender ce que recouvrent les réponses sur certaines croyances. On considérera enfin l’effet d’une religiosité forte ou faible sur les systèmes de valeurs. Les personnes les plus religieuses sont en général plus conservatrices, aussi bien en matière de mœurs que d’orientation politique. Alors que les indifférents et les antireligieux sont beaucoup plus progressistes et ouverts à la modernité.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion, spirituality and the dynamics of class relations
Field #2. Kaarina Aitamurto
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Helsinki
Field #5.
Field #6. The religionization of Muslims and class subjectivity in Russian discussions about Islam
Field #7. In recent years, several scholars have analyzed the religionization of Muslims that is connected to and a part of the securitization of Islam. This paper argues that the religionization of Muslims also shrouds the differences in class positions and entails the culturalization social problems. In this way, it sustains and legitimizes the hierarchic power structures. As a case study, this paper examines Russian discussions about Islam in media, in policy making and the publications and statements of the established Islamic organizations. Due to the post-Soviet migration, migrants from Central-Asia have outnumbered the older Muslim communities in such cities as Moscow and St. Petersburg. At the same time, the authorities have suspicious attitude toward grass-root Islamic activity and encourage the established Islamic organizations to take responsibility of the new Muslim migrants. Two most prominent themes in the Russian discussions about Muslim minority of the country are the integration of migrants and the prevention of radicalism. Concerning both of these, the presented solutions usually emphasize the role of the religious education, whereas social problems receive relatively little attention. The policies for the integration of migrants and the prevention of radicalization are usually implemented from above and often disregard the heterogeneity of the Muslim population. Instead, they contain the ideal type of “cultured” and “moderate” Muslim that is based on the neo-liberal, middle-class values and the model of the older Muslim community. In consequence, the hegemonic discourses of “good Muslim” invalidates the working class and migrant Muslim subjectivities.
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Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Jelle Creemers
Field #3.
Field #4. Evangelische Theologische Faculteit, Leuven
Field #5.
Field #6. Agency of and within the (recognized) Protestant minority in Belgium and its understandings of “secularism” (2003-2018)
Field #7. The current legal framework for religion-state relations in Belgium (Wattier 2016) can be understood as consequent to the historical battle between two sociopolitical mastodons, a ‘liberal’ fraction and a ‘Catholic’ fraction, since the nation’s formation (cf. Kuru 2009). This ongoing power play also sets the contours for the conflicting understandings of ‘secularism’ in Belgium today. Saba Mahmood has recently pointed to the detrimental consequences of such power struggles for members of ‘minority religions’ (Mahmood 2016). Taking cue from her work, my research (Flemish Research Foundation, 2018-2021) investigates the relations between ongoing political and legal religion-state debates and Protestantism in Belgium (est. ersified) religion and the State (cf. Creemers 2015; 2017; 2018). The analyses build on popular and professional publications from within Belgian Protestantism of the past 15 years, including curricula for Protestant Religious Education in (public) schools, and open interviews with key actors.
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Field #1. Religion, Gender and Human Rights: The (De)Secularization of Traditional Values
Field #2. Maria José Rosado
Field #3. Sabrina Alves; Manuela Cirigliano
Field #4. Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo
Field #5.
Field #6. Pope Francisco and the conservative Catholic mobilization
Field #7. In the current context of strengthening conservative thinking and in the struggle for believers, the Catholic Church mobilizes in favor of traditional values, especially the defense of the family and a sexual morality based on the affirmation of heterosexuality as a norm. As in other countries – not only the latin american ones – in Brazil, Catholic and Evangelicals religious actors build strong alliances against what they call "gender ideology" and the Executive and Legislative powers become important spaces for dispute, not only axiological, but also legal. At the same time, an apparent paradox surrounds the figure of Pope Francis, celebrated, especially in the media, as a religious actor of change in the field of sexuality. However, sectors of the hierarchy tend to stiffen and one of the focuses of their attacks is precisely the gender issue, considered a powerful instrument of family destruction. Such a position is assumed by the Pope in many of his public statements. This communication will focus on the process of constructing gender as an ideology, bringing a critical analysis of the Pope's pronouncements on this issue.
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Field #1. Treating the Dead in the Aboriginal Worlds at the Age of Religious Pluralism
Field #2. Laugrand Frédéric
Field #3. Laugrand, A Tamang, J
Field #4. UCL
Field #5.
Field #6. Des morts encore vivants? Le Késheng ja warat batbat des Ibaloi de Tocmo
Field #7. Les Ibaloi, un groupe autochtone qui fait partie des Igorots de la cordillère centrale des Philippines, ont été exposés au christianisme depuis plusieurs siècles. Aujourd’hui, ils perpétuent toutefois leurs traditions ancestrales, et en particulier les rites funéraires. Dans le cadre d’une collaboration avec la communauté catholique de Sabkil-Tocmo initiée en 2012, nous avons eu le privilège d’organiser trois ateliers de transmission des savoirs et de filmer plusieurs rituels. Dans cette communication, nous proposons d’examiner le Késheng ja warat batbat, un rituel qui consiste à déterrer et à réenterrer les morts. Nous décrirons d’abord ce rituel en suivant les différentes séquences qui se succèdent ainsi que les nombreux objets, gestes, paroles et symboles qu’il met en scène de même que la mise à mort des cochons qui servent à des fins divinatoires mais dont les chairs, le sang et les âmes ont des destinées spécifiques. Sur la base de ce rituel qui dure trois journées consécutives, nous examinerons le rôle des cochons comme « connecteurs » et discuterons de la question du sacrifice. Nous verrons également dans quelle mesure ce rituel permet aux vivants de maintenir des relations avec leurs défunts avant qu’ils ne tombent dans la masse des ancêtres anonymes. Comme l’ont bien vu Robert Hertz et Maurice Bloch, les « morts » du rituel figurent d’abord dans une catégorie intermédiaire, n’étant ni vivants ni totalement morts. Tandis que les morts évoluent dans un processus progressif marqué par des déplacements, les vivants se rassemblent. Ils réaffirment leur solidarité avec leurs morts et ainsi régénèrent les relations sociales entre les vivants.
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 1
Field #2. Pål Repstad
Field #3. Pål Repstad
Field #4. University of Agder
Field #5.
Field #6. Sociology of Religion, colored by Institutional Affiliations and Personal Religious Beliefs?
Field #7. In this paper I will discuss how and to what extent institutional context and personal religious beliefs influence empirical research in the sociology of religion. Historically the discipline was connected to strategic work in Christian churches. Sociology of religion has become secularized as a discipline, but still there are many institutional and personal connections between churches and doing sociological research on religion. The other side of the coin seems to be that empirically oriented general sociologists traditionally have been relatively secular. This may have led to ignoring religion as a social factor for long periods, and possibly to exaggerating the significance of religion in recent years. The life and work of some important sociologists of religion is used as examples. However, the author finds no deterministic connection between institutional affiliation and personal beliefs on the one hand, and the way sociology of religion is done on the other. However, there may be some elective affinity between personal experience and the topics chosen for studies, more than the answers given to research questions. The author recommends an increased reflexivity while doing research.
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Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. NGUYEN Thi Hiep
Field #3.
Field #4. CASE/CNRS
Field #5.
Field #6. Premier aperçu des communautés catholiques vietnamienne en région parisienne : entre héritages coloniaux et dynamiques mondialisées
Field #7. Notre communication se propose d’aborder le christianisme mondialisé de France sous l’angle des « catholicismes d’Extrême-Orient ». De premières enquêtes qualitatives réalisées auprès d’un panel représentatif des communautés catholiques vietnamiennes de région parisienne nous permettent de décrire des parcours de vie et des pratiques socioreligieuses en contexte diasporique. Elles nous incitent également à poser un cadre analytique en articulant des questions relevant, au niveau individuel, de la conviction et des identités religieuses, puis à un niveau plus communautaire, de la transmission intrafamiliale et des échanges interculturels, ceci en milieu spécifiquement chrétien. Si la circulation des individus suscite de nouvelles dynamiques religieuses et en réactive d'anciennes au sein de communautés désormais transnationales, la condition de migrant génère aussi, et a fortiori dans le contexte actuel, de nouveaux modes d'investissements religieux, de nouvelles pratiques cultuelles ou parfois le maintien de formes traditionnelles, notamment liturgiques et théologiques. À partir de nos entretiens et plus largement de nos observations de terrains, nous tenterons de dresser des profils types de migrants. Nous décrirons les modalités d’intégration à la culture française mais aussi l’apport de ces communautés vietnamiennes à la vitalité du catholicisme français. Nous rappellerons au préalable certaines spécificités du catholicisme vietnamien relevant de l’histoire religieuse et politique contemporaine mais aussi de référents linguistiques et culturels qui fondent encore aujourd’hui la société vietnamienne dans son ensemble, en transcendant les identités religieuses.
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Field #1. Contemporary Religiosities and Sociological Diagnoses in the West
Field #2. Maria Ch. Sidiropoulou
Field #3.
Field #4. Department of Ethics and Sociology, Social Research Centre for Religion and Culture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (A.U.TΗ.), Greece.
Field #5.
Field #6. Modernity Within Orthodox Judaic Tradition: Being Jewish, or just feeling? Reframing The Study of Contemporary Jewish Identity(-ies) in Greece.
Field #7. The present qualitative and quantitative research highlights the contemporary secular aspects of the Greek Jewish identity(-ies), within the ever-changing world and more specifically, within the context of the secularized local Greek society. The religious identity of the Greek Jewry, although referring to the acceptance of the Judaic religion (Orthodox Judaism) and is presented theoretically as their basic coherent element, however, it has acquired another meaning in practice, more cultural. Through this empirical research, the paper seeks to examine how the self-characterization of a person as a Jew currently in Greece is expressed, what it implies, what additional components it includes, which religious trends are emerged and how those are differentiated from generation to generation both within and outside the Jewish context and environment. In a few words, the paper provides important data about the boundaries of the contemporary Jewish identity(-ies) and belonging in Greece, and also it sheds light on the current trends of Jewish religiosity, which can be of value to the academic sociological community as well. For this research purpose, one hundred and fifty Jews aged 18-75 years old from four different Greek towns (Athens, Thessaloniki, Larissa, Volos) were interviewed, while interviews were conducted during 2016-17 to the largest Jewish communities in Greece, located in the above cities.
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Guillaume Boucher
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Montréal
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious recomposition post Révolution Tranquille : A responsible modernity
Field #7. Hailing from Quebec’s parochial civilisation (Hervieu-Léger 1990), heralds and frequent apologists of « la Révolution tranquille », these Baby-boomers are often associated with the rise of the modern Québec society (Guberman et Olazabal 2011). The Trajectoires religieuses et défis identitaires de Francoquébécois nés catholiques : une ethnographie des itinéraires de sens research project exposes the Québec Baby-boomers’ attitudes toward the catholic religion. A rationalist discourse, an emphasis on the authenticity of beliefs rather than on traditionalist ritual structures, an advocacy for privately lived religion, these are the numerous elements showing that Baby-boomers effectively subscribe to Asad’s definition of modernity: an uncoupling of practices and beliefs, a withdrawal from public to private religious activity and an emphasis on individual beliefs (Asad 1993). However, a careful examination of the transversal themes brought forth by the project’s interviews yields a somewhat different religious modernity. A perreniality of rituals, a reject of normative authority and the persistence of a certain « catholic ideal » allows us to contemplate that the modernity to which the baby-boomers subscribe is to is one characterised by a desire for responsibility, autonomy and independence (Charron 1996). Through an examination of Quebec’s Baby-boomers’ life stories, our contribution will expound this religious modernity. We will demonstrate that the Boomers’ discourses on Catholicism are more a critic of the parochial civilisation (Hervieu-Léger 1990) from which they hail from. Finally, we will show that behind their critics lies an ideal, which reveals their religious aspirations.
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Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Joshua Heyes
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Birmingham
Field #5.
Field #6. Storying sexuality education and religion: findings from a biographic narrative study with Christian young men
Field #7. Globally, sexuality education is increasingly being invested with hope for the formation of sexual and gender equal societies. In England, ‘Relationships and Sex Education’ is being made a statutory part of the national curriculum following many years of campaigning for rights-based, evidence-based, sex-positive, comprehensive sexuality education provision inclusive of diverse gender and sexual identities. The contested nature of this process has highlighted the deep entanglements of sexuality education with the political influence and public claims of the religious. Notably, recent research has drawn attention to the characteristically progressive, liberal and secularist political foundations of sexuality education advocated most prominently in Western nations. However, research examining the interface between religion and sexuality education in lived experience is sparse. This paper will present new findings from a biographic narrative study with Christian young men aged 16-19 in England. The study approaches issues of sexuality education by positioning narratives of learning about sexuality (from parents, peers, internet, school and church) within the participants wider life-story of sexuality and romantic relationships and the evolving sexual subjectivity therein. Focusing in-depth on a single case, ‘Ethan’, we see how religious sexual subjectivity might speak critically and constructively into debates over the policy, pedagogy and practice of sexuality education.
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Field #1. The Social Construction of Reality and the sociology of religion
Field #2. Isaak Deman
Field #3.
Field #4. KU Leuven
Field #5.
Field #6. The Shaping and Significance of Peter L. Berger’s Sociological-Theological Approach to ‘Religion’
Field #7. Peter L. Berger’s important role within the field of the sociology of religion cannot be denied. Indeed, he was among the first sociologists to propose a reinterpretation of classical secularization-theory, and to emphasize the importance of ‘pluralism’ for contemporary religiosity in a globalizing world. While many scholars have either ‘hailed’ or ‘criticized’ Berger’s reinterpretation of classical secularization-theory, the significance of the correlation between Berger’s (i) inductive, Schleiermacherian approach to ‘religion’, on the one hand, and (ii) his views on secularization and pluralism, on the other hand, have often been overlooked. This paper therefore aims to demonstrate how Berger’s inductive definition of ‘religion’, including ‘religious institutions’, was influenced by his sociological, and, perhaps more importantly, by theological presuppositions. Max Weber and Alfred Schutz influenced Berger primarily in his sociological thinking, while Friedrich Schleiermacher and Rudolf Otto shaped mainly his theological thinking. The contributions of these four thinkers helped to develop Berger’s approach to ‘religion’, and his views on secularization and pluralism cannot be understood without reference to them. At the same time, however, these influences have also limited Berger’s approach to ‘religion’, as is manifested in his adherence to predominantly German and Protestant thinkers.
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Field #1. Politics and economics of monasticism
Field #2. Dorota Hall
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute of Philosophy and Sociology of the Polish Academy of Sciences
Field #5.
Field #6. Homosexuality, Priestly Vocation and Changes over Time: the perspective of would-be priests and monks
Field #7. This paper refers to the exchange of values, norms and ideas between Roman Catholic seminaries (both diocesan ones and those run by holy orders) and the ‘world’. It draws on the experience of Polish men who, at some point of their life, undertook priestly formation, later departed from the seminary studies, and today declare themselves as homo- or bisexual, the majority as Roman Catholics. It focuses on how discourses about homosexuality penetrated the personal experience of those men at the threshold and during the formation. It shows that these men were influenced by the ideas about homosexuality promoted not only within the Roman Catholic Church, but also in the wider discursive space – and those have dynamically changed in Poland of the last two decades. Correspondingly, the sexuality-related self-understanding of the study participants came into various, specific to a given historical moment, relationships with their vocation. Available discursive resources allowed them to interpret their homoerotic desire in a way that did not make a barrier to formation. The paper draws on biographic interviews conducted as part of the author’s study among Polish LGBT Christians (2011-2014).
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 2
Field #2. Titus Hjelm
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Helsinki
Field #5.
Field #6. Rereading Peter L. Berger for the Critical Discursive Sociology of Religion
Field #7. Peter L. Berger (1929–2017) was one of the most influential sociologists of the last 60 years. His legacy for the study of religion, however, remains ambiguous. Berger is best known for his work on secularisation and, later, ‘desecularisation’. Berger’s relevance for the study of religion today is therefore largely dependent on which side of the secularisation debate one stands. This paper argues that Berger’s most significant contribution to the study of religion can be found in his earlier work, together with Thomas Luckmann, on social constructionism. Although underdeveloped in Berger’s writings on religion, his earlier ideas about language as a vehicle for world-construction work as a basis for the discursive sociology of religion. This paper offers a rereading of Berger as a constructionist sociologist of religion and adds the dimension of power to the analysis. Together these form what I refer to as Critical Discursive Sociology of Religion.
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Field #1. Religious Minorities: Muslims in the West and Minorities in the Islamic Societies
Field #2. Kerstin Wonisch
Field #3. Mariana Rosca
Field #4. Eurac Research Bolzano/Deusto University
Field #5.
Field #6. Muslim Minority in Spain and Austria: Similar but Different?
Field #7. During the last decades, there has been an increased interest in accommodation policies for Muslim Minorities in both the Austrian as well as the Spanish context. In 1992, almost 80 years later than Austria, Islam has been officially recognized by the Spanish state. Although originating in different social, political and historical contexts, these recognitions have been perceived as great achievements for the respective Muslim communities. Nevertheless, these accommodative policy instruments do not yet fully address the needs of Muslim communities, neither in Spain, nor in Austria. The promotion and establishment of a single catch-all Sunni dominated Muslim representation organization ignores the diversity in dogma and religious practices of the Muslim communities present in both countries. The growing nationalistic tendencies and the rise of Islamophobia influence on laws and policies addressing Muslim communities. This article seeks to compare in a first step accommodation policies for Muslim communities in Spain and Austria and secondly to identify not only similarities and differences of these policies but also related challenges and transferable practices. Drawing on the situation in Austria, with historically bigger experience in Muslim accommodation, the article concludes with the need to revise the single-catch-all policy (both in Spain and in Austria) and address the plurality of claims of the diverse Muslim community.
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Field #1. Theoretical approaches to the social sciences from the field work on religion and spirituality in the global South
Field #2. Donnet Esquivel Romero
Field #3.
Field #4. UNAM
Field #5.
Field #6. Who is the scientologist in Mexico?
Field #7. The actual work will be a sociological study, with this I pretend contribute to the study of religion. As well as lead, the existing works to other horizons not travelled yet in Mexico. In this case, I mean the Scientology, which is a religion not studied in Mexico yet. Therefore, are not exist sociological studies of the Scientology in Mexico. So that, in this work will be drawn up a brief historical travel about the history of the Scientology in Mexico to give a contextual framework. Then I will talk about the identity in the scientology, this being the main issue of the presentation. The principal question that I search to answer is who is the scientologist in Mexico? In addition, exist other issue I be able to answer and is relational to the first question and this is how is the construction of the identity in the Scientology? Accordingly with this work I will be able to observe the particularities of the Scientologist in Mexico, from which social class they come? How they practice and believe? Moreover, if is necessary believe to belong to the Scientology? Therefore, I will be able to show the identity of the Scientologist in Mexico, his practices, his believes and how is the process of belonging to this religion.
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Field #1. Social Movements, Rebellions and Revolutions through Religious Contention
Field #2. C James MacKenzie
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Lethbridge
Field #5.
Field #6. Ethnicity and Religion in Contention: Inculturation, Maya Spirituality and Progressive Social Movements in Guatemala
Field #7. Religion has long been noted as an important force in the contentious, and at times genocidal, politics which have shaped Guatemala for much of its modern history. Analyses of the 36-year-long civil war and its lingering aftermath tend to recognise the progressive role of (generally Catholic) liberation theologies and forms of community organizing, as well as the reactionary response from Pentecostal sectors. Still, as the sites of struggle in the nation have multiplied—from a focus on class, to ethnic and environmental conflicts, for example—the role of religion in these various encounters has become more complex. In this paper I examine the complicated ways different varieties of “Mayanized” religion intersect with progressive social movements, drawing primarily on ethnographic research conducted in the country since 1996. I consider both the merging of Catholic and indigenous Maya religious identities—primarily through the development of liberation-oriented inculturation theology projects through from the 1970s to the present—as well as the contemporary rejection of Christianity by many self-identifying Maya who seek to control and purify their own spirituality. Institutional and organizational differences between these, and related social/religious movements (including the nature and quality of their relation to specific indigenous communities and local cultural norms) are key to evaluate the relative success and failure of religion in motivating concrete political action. I draw upon the ideas of Talal Asad, Pierre Bourdieu and Manuel Castells, among others, in my analysis.
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 1
Field #2. Lene Kühle
Field #3.
Field #4. Aarhus University
Field #5.
Field #6. The juridification of religion
Field #7. The concept of juridification, meaning the increasing impact of law or the intensification of people’s recourse to legal means, has increasingly come forward as a theoretical term in sociology, political science and legal study. The concept appear appealing to describe and analyse the increasing role of bodies like the European Court of Human Rights, as well as the emergence of laws addressing laws from burka bans to laws on religious freedom for minority religion. This paper will discuss the value as well as the problems with drafting the juridification of religion as a theoretical tool contributing to understanding the religious and spiritual situation today.
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Field #1. Living well together in religious diversity
Field #2. Douglas Ezzy
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Tasmania
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious diversity in Australia: Early findings
Field #7. Religious diversity in Australia: Early findings Douglas Ezzy, Gary Bouma, Greg Barton, Anna Halafoff, Lori Beaman, Robert Jackson. Major studies on religious diversity have recently been conducted in the UK, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Our research similarly examines Australian strategies for living well with religious diversity in legislation, education, migration, policing and interfaith initiatives. Religious diversity produces both challenges and creative opportunities in each of these spheres. The challenges and opportunities are both local and social structural as social actors seek strategies to minimise violence and enhance social cohesion. We critically examine the utility of theoretical concepts such as social cohesion, social capital, deep equality, cosmopolitanism, and the shadow of the law. We wrestle with the ways in which these concepts both highlight and obscure various aspects of the challenges and creative outcomes of religious diversity. The concepts, and their social policy uses, also variously reflect, and resist, the aims and ambitions of those with power and control. Social policy and everyday responses to diversity reflect a complex set of intersecting factors in which policy initiatives are interwoven with the particularities of histories, ethnicities, and religious cultures. The discussion will be illustrated with early findings from our empirical studies. Scholars who have led recent international studies on religious diversity will then be asked to critically assess our research design and methods, in light of insights gained from their own studies. Discussants: To be advised
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Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Niki Papageorgiou
Field #3.
Field #4. Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Field #5.
Field #6. Immigrants in Greece: Religious affiliation and social adaptation
Field #7. During the last decades, Greece has transformed, together with the other countries of the European South (Italy, Spain and Portugal) into an immigrant destination as a result of a set of internal and external factors. It attracted, thus, a big number of immigrants primarily from the Balkans and the countries of Eastern Europe which gradually became even bigger with immigrants from Asia and Africa. Immigrants' entry into Greece affects Greek society in a variety of ways, since migrants, besides their labor force, carry with them their national, linguistic and cultural identity, including religious one. In addition, the refugee issue of last years it provoked new migrational arrivals in the country with new ethnic-religious characteristics. So far there are many studies that focus on the economic and labor market incorporation processes, the education, the social mobility and integration policies of immigrants, but little attention has been paid to their religion. In this paper, we search the role that religion plays in the adaptation process of immigrants in Greece. Does it contributes positively to their adaptation or it demarcates boundaries? Does it perform a bridging function or acts as a barrier to inclusion? In order to investigate this issue, three factors should be taken into consideration: the immigrants’ religious origin; the religious homogeneity of the native population; and the relations between the state and the Church, or between the political and religious sphere, in the host country.
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Field #1. The State and spiritual/religious healing processes in contemporary societies
Field #2. Deirdre Meintel
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Montréal
Field #5.
Field #6. Transmitting God’s Healing or Practicing Medicine? A Case from Quebec
Field #7. Most Quebecois, like most Canadians, have had recourse to « alternative and complementary forms of medicine ». Moreover, a team study I led found that healing, in the sense of enhanced well-being, figures prominently in the motivations of those who embark on a spiritual quest. Native-born Québécois are at least nominally Catholic in most cases, but their spiritual search often leads them to frequent groups of other spiritual/religious traditions, typically without conversion. At the same time, media coverage of alternative and spiritual healers is generally quite negative. Those who practice spiritual and alternative modes of healing are subject to anonymous inspections by the Collège des médecins (College of Physicians) and dozens have been prosecuted in recent years for the illegal practice of medicine. This is the context of my experience as an expert witness for the defence in the trial of a church minister in Quebec who offers a spiritual healing ritual for those who request it. The clergyman has been accused of « practicing medicine » by the Collège des médecins. Issues that have come to the fore in this case so far include the distinction between medical treatment and spiritual healing and the applicability of the legal principle of « sacramental secrecy »; i.e., the confidentiality of communications between a religious leader and those seeking their help, in the context of religious diversity.
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Field #1. Hybrid religious identities: methodological implications
Field #2. Nadia Beider
Field #3.
Field #4. Hebrew University
Field #5.
Field #6. Hybrid religious identities: conversion and religiosity
Field #7. At least two fifths of American adults have held more than one religious identity; with a proportion of these having changed their religious identity more than once, yet limited attention has been paid to the effects of such transitions. Conversion is still conceptualized as a wholesale transition, a radical break with the past, with converts assumed to be more zealous than lifelong members of a religious community. This exclusivist view of religious identity persists, despite understandings of identity in the current era as inherently unstable, contingent and multilayered. This paper compares the religiosity of converts with those of cradle members, in order to establish whether converts really are more committed than those whose religious identity has remained stable since childhood. Is it the case that prior religious identity is entirely jettisoned, or do converts retain elements of their previous identity, creating new, hybrid forms of religious belief and practice? I take a quantitative approach based on data from the 2014 Religious Landscape Survey, conducted by Pew in the USA. This large scale survey facilitates an analysis which accounts for both the denomination in which the respondent was raised and the one with which they currently identify. When converts are not treated as an undifferentiated mass, but recognized as having a range of religious trajectories, the complexities and nuances of hybrid religious patterns begin to emerge.
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 2
Field #2. Josh Packard
Field #3. Todd Ferguson
Field #4. University of Northern Colorado
Field #5.
Field #6. Stuck: Exploring Alienation among Religious Professionals
Field #7. In this study, we examine clergy who feel “stuck” in their profession. These priests, ministers, and pastors want to leave religious work but are unable to because they have no other viable career alternatives. We use both Marx’s and Hochschild’s theories of alienation within labor to hypothesize that clergy have the potential to experience the alienation of their own faith because it is a resource they use to produce the religious goods sold within the spiritual marketplace. We explore this hypothesis by examining interviews with American and Canadian clergy from across many religious traditions. We demonstrate clergy not only experience alienation from emotional labor, à la Hochschild, but also the alienation from their own religious beliefs. Yet, these clergy cannot transition to another profession because the work offers a steady source of income and religious professionals have few transferable career skills. Thus, these workers in the spiritual marketplace are stuck between an alienated faith and financial stability.
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Field #1. Religion and Bioethics
Field #2. Sam Han
Field #3.
Field #4. The University of Western Australia
Field #5.
Field #6. Covering Euthanasia and Assisted Dying in Australia: The case of David Goodall
Field #7. While the debates on euthanasia and its complementary term “assisted dying” can be traced back to the mid-19th century in Europe and the United States, more recently, it has reached global proportions—spreading to East Asia (e.g., South Korea and Japan) and Australia. Much of the existing social scientific literature on euthanasia and assisted dying has focused on the legality of euthanasia, particularly in European nations that have enacted various measures allowing it to some degree. This paper proposes to shift that focus both geographically—looking at an Australian case—and substantively, by examining the dynamics of media coverage of a highly-publicized case of euthanasia, namely that of Perth-based scientist David Goodall, who flew to Switzerland in May 2018 to end his own life at the age of 104. His decision galvanized media coverage regarding not only his decision but also the fact the fact that he was crowdfunding part of the expenses and had spoken so publicly about his desire to end his own life. This paper, therefore, analyses Goodall’s death as a “media event,” as recently theorized by Nick Couldry and Andreas Hepp in relation to “mediatization” theory, examining Australian media sources (e.g., the Australian Broadcasting Corporation) and social media, tracking the presence and absence of religious language and themes therein.
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Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Lucas Brito
Field #3.
Field #4. UFRGS (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul)
Field #5.
Field #6. Spirituality and ecology: two realms of modernity
Field #7. Ecology and spirituality can be considered two affluents of the same river. This is one of the hyphotesis that has rised through my fieldwork in ecovillages whose principles are borrowed from Permaculture. Ethnographic research at four ecovillages in South and Southeast regions of Brazil has shown that spirituality is present in daily life of many people who live in this ‘communities for difficult times’ (Léger and Hervieu, 1983). Ecological practices are embedded with the sensitivity to the environment, which is expressed by respect for the immanent sacred of nature. These assumptions enable us to think of ecology and spirituality in terms of ‘naturalization of sacred’ and ‘sacralization of nature’ (Steil and Carvalho, 2008). One of the possible configurations between ecology and spirituality refers to the sense of connection with a holistic or monistic order in which people are included. In a sense, spirituality as well as ecology postulate certain totality or system of beings and things in the world. Finally, this paper aims to register a theoretical dialogue with the contemporary debate regarding the theme and contribute to comprehend how spirituality and ecology relate to modernity, either rising from the modern project or questioning the modern epistemological horizon.
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Field #1. The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe
Field #2. Nina Rosas
Field #3.
Field #4. Federal University of Minas Gerais
Field #5.
Field #6. Brazilian Christian Philo-Semitism and the call for a conservative agenda: a case study
Field #7. In Brazil, a country with close to 30% Evangelicals, one can discern among these religious followers a growing appreciation and adoption of Jewish symbols and rituals. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a particular case, namely, the initiatives of a Pentecostal pastor and singer, Ana Paula Valadão Bessa, who has designs on the international stage. Among her actions worth highlighting are the caravans organized to record two albums in Israel. Bessa believes that Brazil, as a country undergoing a moment of revival to which she attributes the transformations of society, is the destination to pray for and to bless Israel, in anticipation of the second coming of the Messiah. She was an active voice among evangelicals supporting the campaign of President Jair Bolsonaro, who plans to transfer the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, mimicking the feat of Donald Trump. I interpret the Philo-Semitism led by Bessa as part of a conservative agenda being developed by the Evangelicals. The belief that the creation of the State of Israel is a divine plan lends support to the argument that God directly influences urban geography and the political lives of peoples. This perspective would give legitimacy to a series of onslaughts made by Evangelicals in the Brazilian public arena, above all regarding gender conservatism and the fight against corruption and the supposed political left.
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Field #1. The reciprocal influence of religion and demography
Field #2. Antonius Liedhegener
Field #3. Anastas Odermatt
Field #4. ZRWP - University of Lucerne
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious Affiliation, Religious Diversity and Population Change in Contemporary Europe
Field #7. Religious affiliation, religious diversity and changes in the size and structure of populations are intertwined phenomena. In particular, the growing religious pluralisation in Europe is regularly used to explain a whole range of phenomena and developments in the realm of religion and politics. Yet it is empirical less clear how religious diversity and population growth (or decline) are related to each other. Different causal relationships are plausible and many intervening variables might be at work. Although religious pluralisation is not a concept easy to define, it is obvious from the empirical literature on religion that the distribution of the population to religious bodies and traditions is the most important starting point to talk about religious pluralisation empirically. Thus, data on religious affiliation are at the center of this kind of investigation. In fact, much used indices of religious pluralisation like the Herfindahl-index and its derivates ultimately rest on statistics on religious affiliation. The paper presents established European/EU-statistics on population growth and new data for the degree of religious pluralisation in about 50 countries of Europe and its Eastern neighbourhood based on the “Swiss Metadatabase of Religious Affiliation (SMRE)”. Data are given for the structure and dynamics of the religious composition in Europe. Its dynamics are highlighted by a comparison of two periods of time, 2000 and 2010. Based on the SMRE-estimates, the paper demonstrates that religious pluralisation measured by changes in religious affiliation is by far not a uniform process across Europe. It will test the hypotheses that population growth is a driver of religious pluralisation and its different extent and dynamics across Europe.
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Field #1. Tracing Religion as a Global, Transcultural Knowledge Category
Field #2. Annette Schnabel
Field #3. Heiko Beyer
Field #4. Institute for Sociology - University of Dusseldorf
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion and Weltanschauung: The Politics of Religion and the Religiosity of the Political
Field #7. The contribution discusses the relationship between religious and political worldviews and argues that both types of phenomena share three features: they offer (a) robust structures of meaning (nomizations), (b) clear moral guidelines (manichaeism), and (c) a prophecy of the future (eschatologies). Using data from the European Values Study of 2008/2009 (n = 29,995) we found that Catholic and Orthodox respondents reveal higher amounts of conservatism than the average respondent whereas Protestants are slightly more liberal and socialist. Orthodox individuals had the highest affinity for fascist worldviews. Multilevel logit regression models further show that especially fascist and conservative worldviews are based on nomizations, manichaeism, and eschatological beliefs. The same accounts for all religious worldviews with the lowest effects found for Protestants and the highest for European Muslims. Analyses also show that the three basic elements of worldviews are more relevant for individuals living in countries with greater economic deprivation and inequality.
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Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. DENISE GOULART
Field #3.
Field #4. GSRL - GROUPE SOCIETES, RELIGIONS, LAICITES
Field #5.
Field #6. Le réseau migrant : La solidarité communautaire entre les évangéliques brésiliens en France
Field #7. Cette étude cherche à analyser le rôle de la religion en tant que "productrice d'intégration sociale" dans le contexte de l'immigration légale / illégale, ainsi que l'impact du réseau de soutien social via religion expérimenté dans la vie des migrants brésiliens en France. L’appartenance religieuse et le réseau construit par ces résidants n’a pas encore été étudié mais il est certes que le maillage d’églises brésiliennes ne cesse de croître. Les brésiliens primo arrivants trouvent dans les réseaux protestants, surtout évangéliques, de sources de support spirituel mais également de travail. L’analyse des communautés virtuelles et un recensement aident cette étude à trouver les chemins pour lesquels passent les brésiliens installés et participants à des églises évangéliques, qu’elles soient des églises locales ou groupement des fidèles réunis dans les maisons, dans le style « cellule ». Le panorama urbain, le réseau spirituel, de travail et de soutien et le fait d’être évangélique dans un pays sécularisé comme la France sont les points de convergence de cette étude. L’étude s’intéresse aussi au décalage entre les perspectives d’insertion et les expériences de l’arrivée. L’enjeu de ce travail en cours est celui de qualifier les formes d’accueil et de mise en réseaux et leurs modalités d’expression tout en montrant comment elles viennent interroger les composantes identitaires des migrants brésiliens en France au travers de la religion et des groupes évangéliques. Elle s’inspire des travaux qui abordent les migrants sous l’angle de leurs compétences, leurs savoir-faire et leur savoir-être pour « s’organiser dans la mobilité».
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Field #1. Religion and the Contemporary Right
Field #2. Yoshihide Sakurai
Field #3.
Field #4. Hokkaido University
Field #5.
Field #6. From ideological right to survivalist’s right: Two case studies of the religious right since the 1960s in Japan
Field #7. The features of the current religious right in East Asia could be understand by comparing with the right-wing movements in politics in Cold War era. In this paper two religious right groups in Japan will be illustrated from the view point of their political/social agenda, strategy of mass mobilization, and the leader and the followers of those groups. The first politico-religious group is the International Federation for Victory over Communism which was established by the Unification Church in 1968 to obtain the patronage from the conservative politicians such as Park Chung-hee in Korea, Chiang Kai-shek in Taiwan, and Nobusuke Kishi and his successors in Liberal Democratic Party in Japan. Those conservative leaders ideologically collaborated to develop anti-communist movement among citizens from the 1960s and 1970s. They struggled against civil leftists and students in cities and gained support from rural area and mass underclass. However, after the Cold War they lost common ideology and went back to their collective memory of the Japanese colonialism so that four East Asian countries polarized with their own interest and imagined nations. The second one, Japan Conference was established in 1997 to collect nationalists from Shinto, new religions, and grassroots in central and regional politicians to promote paternalistic social policy and patriotism. Due to recent economic competition, territory issues, and different historical recognition, even general public received its extreme views and xenophobia on the Internet and grew angry against multiculturalist and inclusion policy from the liberal side. They felt left behind and wanted survival in global economy. Their mind set and behaviors is also elaborated.
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Field #1. Religious Diversity and Political Conflict in Europe
Field #2. Ragnhild Sørbotten Moen
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Agder
Field #5.
Field #6. Turning points – leaving religious extremism behind
Field #7. Islamist terrorism has contributed to many years of devastating civil war in Syria, societal disturbances in the larger Middle East and left Western Africa in an even deeper crisis. In the years 2012-2015, thousands of young boys and girls travelled from the western countries to Syria as foreign fighters to join ISIS. There is an apparent relevance to study radicalisation in these times, and especially interesting is trying to understand what goes on in the minds of those who choose an extremist path in life. As part of my Ph.D-project within the field of Sociology of Religion, I have conducted interviews with individuals who are former members of different Islamist groups and organisations that support violent jihad. The informants, who now live in Scandinavia as regular citizens, have expressed how they understand their own radicalisation and deradicalisation and pointed at the religious, social and emotional factors that drove their processes towards- and out of violence. In this paper I will tell some of their stories and explore the turning points of their radicalisation processes that led them to ultimately leave the groups behind and dissociate from extremism. There seem to be a common assumption amongst professionals that once a person gets involved in behaviour that legitimizes violence, it is too late for preventative measures. This paper seeks to challenge this idea by presenting material that shows pathways out of the devastating jungle of violence.
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Field #1. Politics, Religion and Gender in Central and Eastern Europe (joint ISSR-ISORECEA session)
Field #2. Aleksandra Sygnowska
Field #3.
Field #4. Polish Academy of Sciences
Field #5.
Field #6. Dialectic of Mercy: Preaching Contempt for Difference
Field #7. The main assumption of this paper is that discourses related to anti-gender and anti-refugee sentiments interact with, fuel and reproduce each other and, in consequence, influence the social imagery around religion and gender. Focusing on the relationship between Polish nationalism, Catholicism and feminism, this paper intends to examine the intensification of discursive violence towards communities stigmatised for non-compliance with ‘true Polishness’ as well as the marginalisation of this violence in the current Polish political debate. At the same time, it attempts to challenge the role of Polish feminism in confronting and deconstructing the dominant narrative as regards anti-gender and anti-refugee attitudes. For this purpose, I analyse a narrative strategy applied by a Polish Catholic priest Dariusz Oko. Firstly, I argue that his activity as a clergyman, scholar and current affairs commentator embodies the essential intersections of anti-gender and anti-refugee narratives. Secondly, I claim that, having access to and control over political discourse, Dariusz Oko plays a prominent role in social mobilisation and, thereby, makes a significant contribution to the populist surge that sweeps Poland. Finally, I contend that his performance voices an image of Catholicism as a religion that aspires to successfully resist the process of secularisation, consolidate its position of ultimate authority and, subsequently, subordinate its followers to only one interpretation of morality. All of the above, I argue, shows an urgent need for critical reflection on feminism as a powerful site of discourse creation that can mobilise resistance against anti-gender and anti-refugee politics.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. Tereza Picková
Field #3.
Field #4. Charles University in Prague
Field #5.
Field #6. Pilgrim and Tourist Bodies: Understanding of Pilgrimage through Body Experiences
Field #7. In my contribution I want to look at pilgrimage from the perspective of anthropology of the body and explore how the experience of the pilgrimage becomes embodied in the physical body. Furthermore I will describe how different bodily experiences create boundaries between pilgrims and tourists, and how these experiences are being understood in terms of self-identification as a tourist, or a pilgrim. I focus on the changing face of Europe’s most massive pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Through the analysis of my own auto-ethnographic diary and interviews with other pilgrims and tourists I want to show, that pilgrimage can be understood as a process of constructing a “pilgrim body”; complex skill, consisting of physical, psychological, spiritual and social dimension, each describing different aspect of the pilgrimage itself, all embodied in the physical body of a pilgrim. To “become a pilgrim”, is achieved through several strategies, such as walking, socialising, solitude, separation, and asceticism. This experience results in a form of a technique of the body (Mauss 1968) which can be learnt, and used in everyday life after the pilgrimage ends. Through such approach I want to show, that we might understand pilgrimage as a form of physical experience with transcendental overlap, focused mainly on individual progress, but constructed together in friendly communitas of pilgrims, described by Victor Turner (Turner 2004). Finally, I will elaborate on how different physical experiences (especially the amount and understanding of pain) on the pilgrimage can determine self-understanding in terms of pilgrims and tourists.
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Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. Yannick Fer
Field #3.
Field #4. Centre Maurice Halbwachs (CNRS)
Field #5.
Field #6. La communauté Vie et Partage : de la Martinique à Paris, parcours d’engagement et sociabilités ultramarines dans une ville globale
Field #7. Vie et Partage est une communauté catholique d’orientation charismatique fondée en 2000 à la Martinique, présente également en Guadeloupe et en Guyane. La communauté accorde une attention particulière à « l’évangélisation des « enfants dispersés » et s’est implantée à partir de 2003 parmi la diaspora antillaise de Paris, puis à Bordeaux, Marseille et Toulouse. Cette communication s’intéressera aux mécanismes de construction d’une communauté distinctive, qui réinvestit à sa manière une perspective antillaise d’intégration au sein de l’Église en la mettant au service d’un projet de revitalisation religieuse. Vie et Partage reprend en effet à son compte le refus de constituer une communauté à part exprimé par l’ensemble des catholiques antillais – au nom de l’universalisme catholique et d’une même citoyenneté française. Le « retour dans l’Église » qu’elle promeut peut s’entendre comme l’expression d’une volonté commune aux mouvements issus du renouveau charismatique de renouveler l’institution de l’intérieur en promouvant de nouvelles formes d’expérience et d’engagement. Il peut aussi être lu, sur un mode plus implicite, comme une façon de revendiquer une place à part entière pour un catholicisme antillais militant, qui offre ici un point d’ancrage attirant – au-delà de la seule diaspora antillaise – des croyants plutôt jeunes et souvent issus des migrations internationales. Ce catholicisme militant se distingue enfin par un accent mis sur le « témoignage personnel » à travers la mise en ordre rigoureuse des vies personnelles et une morale conjugale en rupture avec les pratiques ordinaires des catholiques antillais en région parisienne.
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Field #1. The reciprocal influence of religion and demography
Field #2. Nadja Milewski
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Rostock
Field #5.
Field #6. Religiosity, education, and gender attitudes among the Turkish second generation in Europe
Field #7. Religiosity as well as attitudes toward gender equality and sexual liberalization are central to debates about immigrant integration in Europe. Studies of Turkish migrants have shown that they tend to transmit the culture of origin across generations and that they maintain higher levels of Muslim religiosity than other immigrant groups. Previous studies usually worked with the assumption that immigrant descendants to Europe are influenced by two competing forces, religiosity and education: The trend to higher education may facilitate cultural assimilation to the more liberal attitudes of the European majority populations. At the same time, the second generation may be “held back” to the more conservative values of their parents by their higher religiosity. The paper follows two research questions: What are the patterns of religiosity and education among second generation Turks in Europe? How do these education-religiosity milieus influence their attitudes toward gender and family (premarital sex, abortion, gender equality)? We used data from the project on The Integration of the European Second Generation (TIES 2007-08) from Austria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. The sample consisted of 4,800 respondents aged 18 to 35. We construct five types of religiosity, which are derived from 8 items related to religious attachment and practice (i.e., non-religious, private, selective, symbolic, and strict). Low and high religious persons were found in all educational groups. Higher education is only associated with greater acceptance of attitudes regarding gender equality and sexuality if it coincides with no or low religiosity.
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Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Heidi Henriksson
Field #3.
Field #4. Åbo Akademi University
Field #5.
Field #6. Education, gender diversity and civil society: a Finnish case of conservative religious advocacy in schools
Field #7. The paper concerns education, religion and gender in a Finnish context. It discusses how organizations outside school attempt to influence schools. The Finnish National Agency for Education issued in 2015 a new guideline for education on gender equality. A conservative religious organization called "Authentic Marriage" reacted against this document, particularly on the issue of gender diversity. The organization encourages parents to inform schools that their children are not allowed to participate in gender diversity education, providing them with a ready-made form to submit to their children’s school. This model is taken from the Finnish Freethinkers, who similarly assist parents in withdrawing their children from religious events in school. This paper maps the advocacy of Authentic Marriage in relation to the governmental education agency, the majority church as well as to other advocacy groups. Authentic Marriage’s stance is contrasted with official guidelines of the church. As its primary opponent, Authentic Marriage frames the main Finnish organization for gender and sexual minority rights, Seta, which is also active in schools. The main material for the paper consists of documents from the above-mentioned organizations. Authentic Marriage portrays a conflict between religion and a constructivist understanding of gender. The organization participates in debates on gender, religion and education, claiming that if there can be freedom from religion in school, there should also be a possibility of freedom from any "ideology". The school becomes a battlefield where different organizations take part in the boundary making over what schools are expected to teach their students.
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Field #1. Religion and the Contemporary Right
Field #2. Esra Ozyurek
Field #3. Julian Goepffhart
Field #4. London School of Economics
Field #5.
Field #6. Ex-, Practicing, and Converted Muslim Intellectuals in the German Far Right
Field #7. Anti-Muslim resentments and resistance against immigration are often identified as key drivers of the far-right nationalist and populist mobilization throughout Europe. However, over the last decade an increasing number of Turkish, Arab, and Iranian background as well as converted Muslim intellectuals find a comfortable space for themselves in national far-right politics through Western Europe. Drawing on interviews and analysis of written work by ex-, present, and converted Muslim intellectuals in the German far right this paper first investigates the positional roles these intellectuals play inside the far-right and the German political landscape more broadly. We suggest their positioning in the German public and political sphere is not only blurring the far-right vs. Islam dichotomy but equally the boundaries between the German New Left and New Right. In fact, these intellectuals speak to an audience that reaches from the far-right to the centre and the far left. Second, by looking at how they approach Germanness and the role of immigrants in it, we seek to explore continuities and ruptures between the old and the new conceptions of national identity. Our initial findings suggest that these intellectuals support either spiritual or rationalist conceptions of Germanness, building on a long term tension on German identity.
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 2
Field #2. Polina Vrublevskaya
Field #3.
Field #4. St. Tikhon's Orthodox University and Åbo Akademi University
Field #5.
Field #6. ’Sacred Individual’: a study on religious and secular conceptualizations of moral individualism
Field #7. This paper follows the durkheimian tradition in the theory of the sacred and implements it in the empirical study aiming to demonstrate its explanatory power and relevance in the context of a complex (modern) society. The author deals mainly with two ideas from Durkheim’s intellectual legacy that allow comprehending the sacred and profane in the context of a scaling, differentiating and rationalizing society. The first idea is about the gradually increasing role of language in expressions of the sacred in the conditions of complex society. At the origins of this process lies the appearance of the sacred language and the fixation of vitally important ideas in the special verbal forms (prayers, sacred texts, etc.). The second idea is of the ‘culte de la personne’ as a constituting core of Western morality. Drawing on the Durkheim’s undeveloped point, this paper argues that the culte de la personne or, differently put, moral individualism corresponds with the complex social order and encompasses its sacred\profane division. Hereof is assumed that the idea of the ‘sacred individual’ which might be considered as a foundation of the modern social order, i.e. constitutes its morality, is fixed in and communicated via linguistic concepts rather than other forms of expression (e.g. rituals, symbols, images). This paper introduces an empirical study on how moral individualism code is conceptualized in the narratives of young adults from Russia and Finland. As appears from the study, both religious (Christian) and secular vocabularies are involved to express the idea of the ‘sacred individual’.
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Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Alexandre Grandjean
Field #3.
Field #4. ISSR - University of Lausanne / ISOR - Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona-
Field #5.
Field #6. Dark Green Agronomies and the “Spiritualization” of agroecology: 
The Case of Biodynamic and Neo-shamanic Wine-crafting in Switzerland
Field #7. In recent years, many Swiss wine-crafters have favored ecological as well as “holistic” frameworks to husband over their soils, plants and wines. This notably implies engaging one’s domain into biodynamic farming, which is an esoterically inspired and driven agroecological approach. Biodynamic farming has a strong anthroposophical backdrop due to Rudolf Steiner’s legacy as the instigator of this agronomical approach, yet on the ground wine-crafters also tend to blend it with other contemporary “spiritual” approaches, such as neo-shamanism, geobiology or other “New Age” inspired practices. Along common “organic” treatments these wine-crafters notably sprinkle “dynamized” alchemical preparations on their plants, use energetic crystals during fermentations, or engage into trans-species communication with technics such as dowsing or reflexology. In this presentation, I shall question out of a one-year fieldwork (2017-2018) whether these engagements into “holistic” frameworks testify of a “spiritualization” of agroecology. Yet, what is then being “spiritualized” by the wine-crafters? The practitioners “selves” according to contemporary literature on the “subjective turn” in contemporary spirituality movements (Woodhead&Heelas 2007)? Or the relation with their plants and soils, and/or with the abstract figures of “Nature” or the “Cosmos”, either conceived as a living entity or as an ever-moving principle (Taylor 2010)? Through in-depth analysis, this presentation shall investigate what are the dynamics of “ecospiritual” engagements into what I label as Dark Green Agronomies.
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Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Ånund Brottveit
Field #3.
Field #4. KIFO, Institute for Church, Religion, and Worldview Research
Field #5.
Field #6. Dialogue as a political tool in religious diversity governance?
Field #7. Faith and worldview dialogues, often referred to internationally as ‘interreligious dialogues’, are multiplying in Norway at the same time as central and local authorities pay more attention to the increasing religious diversity. The political discourse on religion has shifted focus from liberal critic of the majority religion and religious rights for minority communities, to “problems” associated with minority religions. The simultaneously dismantling of the Norwegian Lutheran State-Church, whose traditional privileges are not any longer self-evident, does also give politicians an impetus to make changes in religion politics. In this context, it is important to raise questions whether dialogue forums and bridge-building projects may be instrumentalized by authorities and used as political tools in diversity governance. Foucault-inspired governance theory may help us to understand new forms of diversity management represented by a new visibility of religion, new procedures, new legitimating rationalities, and a new kind of institutional actors operating in “the grey zone” between government and civil society. Governance theory prescribes an indirect, collaborative and “soft” mode of ruling the population. Is this what is happening with the introduction of new religion policies in Norway right now?
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Field #1. The Social Construction of Reality and the sociology of religion
Field #2. Hubertq Knoblauch
Field #3.
Field #4. TU Berlin
Field #5.
Field #6. The communicative construction of transcendence
Field #7. Berger and Luckmann’s “Social Construction of Reality” (1966) was not only preceded by a common article by both authors on the “sociology of religion as sociology of knowledge” (1963). Anticipating their argument in this enormously influential book, it was also directly followed by two books in which both authors developed sociological theories of religion. Luckmann developed in his “Invisible Religion” an “functionalist” theory of transcendence which had been as influential as Berger’s. While Berger’s later work had been more present in the international discussion, Luckmann’s adaptation of Schutz’ theory of transcendence was as unnoticed in the Anglophone discussion as his attempt to approach lived religion in new methodological and empirical approaches which lay stress on the language of religion, its communicative genres and, more generally, what came to be called the communicative construction. In this paper I want to sketch, first, the changing concept of transcendence which was already grounded in the Invisible Religion. The implicit idea of the communicative construction of transcendence has been elaborated in a move from the social to the communicative construction of reality, which will be sketched in the second part. If time allows, the third part of the paper provides some empirical cases for the communicative construction of transcendence which allow to indicate the fruitfulness of the approach in studying religion as social phenomenon in general as well as in the study of contemporary forms of religion.
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Field #1. Religious configurations and transformation in Latin America
Field #2. Nestor Da Costa
Field #3.
Field #4. Catholic University of Uruguay
Field #5.
Field #6. Who are the non-religious in South America?
Field #7. In recent years, surveys have begun to reflect with greater numerical values, those people who do not register in believing traditions or institutionalized religious groups to present themselves as either believers in transcendence or even non-believers. The regional bibliography pay attention to this phenomenon with various categories such as "non-affiliated believers", "Catholic in my own way," "believer in my own way," "'churchless' believers," "non-practicing believers" "non-religious", or "religious self-accounting". This paper explores these groups from a qualitative perspective by collecting 60 in-depth interviews among self-identified "non-religion" people from three cities in Latin America: Cordoba, Argentina; Lima, Peru, and Montevideo, Uruguay. It is an intentional sub sample from a bigger project called "The Transformation of Lived Religion In Urban Latin America: A Study of Contemporary Latin-American’s experience of the Transcendent" funded by the John Templeton Foundation.
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Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. Gwendoline Malogne Fer
Field #3.
Field #4. CMH
Field #5.
Field #6. Les Antillais catholiques d’ile de France : entre dispersion et remobilisation
Field #7. A partir es années 1960, les Antillais ont été nombreux à migrer vers la France métropolitaine, dans le cadre de la politique étatique (Bumidom) ou de départs individuels liés à la poursuite d’études ou la recherche d’emploi. La plupart résident en région parisienne et ont reçu une éducation catholique. Afin d’accompagner ces Antillais (aujourd’hui estimés à 200 000), l’Eglise catholique a mis en place l’aumônerie nationale Antillo-Guyanaise (ANAG) qui n’a pas vocation à se substituer aux paroisses locales mais à aider les Antillais à mieux s’insérer dans ces paroisses. Cette communication analysera dans un premier temps la genèse et les limites de ce modèle organisationnel de l’ANAG ainsi que les différentes activités proposées en direction de « la communauté » antillaise notamment lors des temps forts du calendrier liturgique (Chanté Nwel, jour de l’An etc.). Dans un second temps, à partir de l’étude de la paroisse de l’Estrée à Saint-Denis, nous nous intéresserons aux modalités d’engagement des Antillais catholiques, en montrant comment l’engagement local se conjugue avec la fréquentation d’autres hauts lieux du catholicisme parisien (Rue du Bac, Montmartre etc.). Ces pratiques cumulatives ou circulatoires laissent entrevoir tout une gamme de pratiques populaires parfois qualifiées de « magico religieuses » par la hiérarchie ecclésiale qui invitent à s’interroger sur le rapport que ces Antillais catholiques entretiennent avec l’institution religieuse.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Olaf Müller
Field #3. Detlef Pollack
Field #4. University of Münster
Field #5.
Field #6. National identity, religiosity and attitudes towards immigration in Europe
Field #7. Social and political debates in European societies seem to be increasingly influenced by a new cleavage, which is connoted by cultural and religious issues. Thematically, the conflict focuses on the refugee issue, religious and cultural diversity, state responsibilities for regulating this diversity, problems of opening borders, as well as feelings of over-foreignization. Against this background, aspects of social and political affiliation are being renegotiated in the same way as questions about the future shaping of the political community as a whole. Religion is directly involved in the formation of the new line of conflict, particularly with regard to the collective self-definition, i.e. the distinction between the implied “we” and the “others”. The contribution analyses, which patterns and developments can be found on the national level regarding peoples’ attitudes towards immigration, immigrants and foreigners and explores, to what extent different concepts of national identity influencing these attitudes. Apart from the question, whether religion by itself is an important part of the concept of national belonging or not, its role might be ambivalent and is to be investigated in more detail on the individual level. Does religiosity rather promote “liberal” orientations (based on the grace of charity), or is it accompanied instead by an increased degree of perseverance (as an expression of religious-cultural defence)? This contribution explores these questions on the basis of quantitative survey data.
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Field #1. The reciprocal influence of religion and demography
Field #2. Anne Goujon
Field #3. Claudia Reiter
Field #4. Vienna Institute of Demography
Field #5.
Field #6. Regional differences in religious diversification in Austria: The impact of migration
Field #7. Religious affiliation is nowadays getting plenty of attention in the public debate in Europe with increased presence in media and in the policy discourse. Austria is no exception. However, data on the number of affiliates to different religions are rather scarce. In the case of Austria, the 2001 census was the last collection exercise on religious affiliation and demographic modelling techniques are needed to provide estimates beyond this point. There are also substantial variations at the regional level, particularly depending on the impact of differentiated migration and secularization patterns. We compare the religious landscape in two Austrian provinces with substantial immigrant populations: Vienna (both region and capital city) and Vorarlberg, paying particular attention to the impact of the 2015 refugee flows. The reconstruction of the religious composition of the population for 2018 for the two regions shows that Vorarlberg follows similar trends as those observed in Vienna since 2001: strong decline in the share of Roman Catholics, strong increase in the population who is unaffiliated, and substantial increase in the share of Muslims which is the outcome of two main trends – fertility and migration. We further study the origin (country of birth) of Muslims residing in Vienna and in Vorarlberg in 2018 that points at an increasing Austrian-born population, originating from parents or grandparents born predominantly in Turkey, but also at a diversification linked to the various migration waves. We will point out similarities in trends as well as the notable differences between the two regions.
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Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Dario Paulo Rivera
Field #3. Dario Paulo Rivera
Field #4. Methodist University of São Paulo
Field #5.
Field #6. Brazilian Pentecostalism and Andean culture in Peru. Syncretism and sociocultural affinities
Field #7. In the last decades of the twentieth century, the Pentecostal Church God is Love (PCGL), of origin in Brazil, consolidated its growth among migrants from the Andean regions of Peru in the city of Lima. Rituals and practices linked to exorcism, healing and miracles occupy central place in the religious system of PCGL. The followers of the PCGL Lima city are mainly migrants from Andean regions, where practices and rituals of healing linked to magic are common, since before the arrival of Christianity. This paper analyzes the affinities between the Andean worldview and the magical vision of the world in the Pentecostalism of PCGL, spread in Lima by Brazilian pastors and missionaries. We hypothesized that the entry of Andean migrants to positions of Presbyters and Pastors in PCGL, fact verified in field observation, created the conditions for a syncretism, without friction, between Andean ritual and Brazilian Pentecostal ritual. The empirical support of this research is periodic observations of the worships in Lima city in the last five years. Pentecostalism that migrates from Brazil to Peru spreads especially among migrants from the Andean regions of the country to the modern urban context. The Pentecostal institution was able to manage successfully the relationship between the rituals and traditional practices of Pentecostalism and central elements of the Andean culture of its followers. After almost 40 years of this church in Peru there is a syncretism of "double hand" (Roger Bastide) between religious institution and Andean migrants.
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Field #1. The reciprocal influence of religion and demography
Field #2. Vegard Skirbekk
Field #3. Jose Navarro
Field #4. Columbia University
Field #5.
Field #6. POOR MAN’S RELIGION; POVERTY AND RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION WORLDWIDE 1970 – 2010
Field #7. Economic inequality and religion have substantial links and a traditionally interwoven relationship, and despite declines in financial hardship in recent decades, high shares of the world population still live in poverty (Inklaar and Rao 2017; Kraay and Van der Weide 2017). The United Nations has declared the eradication of poverty by 2030 as one of its Sustainable Development Goals (UN 2013). Great progress has been made in reducing poverty, but as rates decrease, reducing poverty further seems to be getting harder, with practitioners looking for further factors that affect poverty to make the fight more effective (Crespo Cuaresma et al 2018). Understanding the interlinkages between religion and poverty is relevant to several domains, including to assess a) how poverty levels across religions coincide with religious tensions, conflicts and societal divisions around the world, b) which policies may be most effective at poverty alleviation could depend on the religious composition of the economically deprived, c) poverty can both draw some to religion when financial, social or moral support and a sense of belonging could be found, however it could also alienate others from religious beliefs, d) behaviours that can be grounded in religious convictions may alleviate or perpetuate or even raise poverty. In spite of this, there is a lack of an understanding of how religion relates to poverty. These motives have raised interest and concern with respect to how religion and poverty interrelate.
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Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Leslie Francis
Field #3. Abdullah Sahin
Field #4. University of Warwick
Field #5.
Field #6. Assessing attitude toward religious diversity among Muslim adolescents within the UK: The effects of religious, theological and psychological factors
Field #7. Understanding variations in attitude toward religious diversity among (minority) Muslim adolescents within Western Christian, post-Christian, or secular societies is a matter of concern within the sociology of religion (concerned with religious factors), empirical theology (concerned with theological factors), and the psychology of religion (concerned with psychological factors). Drawing on data provided by 335 13- to 15-year-old Muslim students from England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales (within the context of the Young People’s Attitude to Religious Diversity project conducted by the Warwick Religions and Education Research Unit), this study tests the power of religious factors (including prayer and worship attendance), theological factors (including positions within the theology of religions and God images), and psychological factors (including self-esteem and empathy) to explain variance within the Muslim Attitude toward Religious Diversity Index (MARDI). Regression analyses conducted separately among male and among female students demonstrate that all three sets of variables (embedded within their different theoretical frameworks) when considered together contribute predictive power, suggesting that the three theoretical frameworks are complementary and that greater insight into variation in attitude toward religious diversity among Muslim students is generated from multidisciplinary collaboration. The implications of these findings are discussed for future projects concerning attitudes toward religious diversity, and for the design and implementation of multidisciplinary research embedded within the sociology of religion, but enriched by perspectives drawn from empirical theology and from the psychology of religion.
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Field #1. Religion, spirituality and the dynamics of class relations
Field #2. Nuran Erol Isik
Field #3.
Field #4. Izmir University of Economics
Field #5.
Field #6. NEW AGE IN TURKISH SOCIETY: NEGOTIATING CLASS AND CULTURE IN A WORLD OF SPIRITUALISM
Field #7. Recently, Turkish society has experienced strains and struggles over issues embedded in the history and politics of identity, laicism and Islamism. These macro strains constitute perhaps the most important sociological background features in a new search for meaning-making practices in different segments of society. New Age culture has become an area of sociological investigation, leading to the emergence of a series of intertwined phenomena at micro and macro levels. Turkish society has a long history of Islamic culture, as well as secularism, and the tension between these markers, which has influenced the spectrum of individualism and collectivism. At a personal level, spirituality can be amplified through different methods, so as to enlighten the degree of individualism, piety, universalism, altruism, and morality that is internalized by individuals. The practice of New Age culture at different levels can be considered as a habitus, as well as a moral language for use in the negotiation of the ambivalent nature of identity formations, as well as traumas as outcomes of class positions. Members of the New Age community involved in searches for new lifestyles tend to seek new identities as well as new spiritual capital in the face of various emerging struggles at both the existential and sociological level. Thus, the paper will focus on two major questions: What are the main motivations of New Age practitioners in terms of constructing a moral individualism? How do they negotiate their spiritual capital and cultural capital in coping with daily traumas and struggles? The paper will be based on qualitative data obtained in Izmir, Turkey, from upper middle class women. This group was chosen because it has been observed that cultural capital has increasingly become a precondition for spiritual capital among women engaged in renegotiating their psychological or social problems through the moral language of New Age discourses.
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Field #1. Religion towards Migration
Field #2. Wojciech Sadlon
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute for Catholic Church Statistics
Field #5.
Field #6. WHY POLISH CATHOLICS BECOME LESS RELIGIOUS WHEN EMIGRATE TO CATHOLIC IRELAND?
Field #7. In 2017 there were more than 2 million Polish citizens who recently escaped Poland (ISKK 2017). Polish citizens have migrated especially from rural areas, often from local communities strongly characterized by traditional culture with significant role of religious institutions, especially Catholic parishes. ‘New migration’ in comparison to ‘old migration’ is substantially characterized by thriving for improvement in financial and life conditions (Łodziński 2014, Engbersen et. al 2014) and – in contrast to past migration – by religious decline. In my presentation I will explain why Polish citizens when emigrate become less religious when migrate to Catholic Ireland. I will demonstrate that traditional Polish Catholicism was strongly attached to space and local culture (Bujak 1908, Ciupak 1961, Piwowarski 1978). In traditional societies transcendence was integrated with other orders of reality through rich system of rituals and symbols which affected human emotionality and shaped reflexivity. Migration transforms not only space but also natural, social and performative order for these who decide to leave their homeland (esp. Archer 1988; 2000). Migration affects religiosity because it disintegrates religious experience from its original contexts and deconstructs tradition of local communities. From such perspective I study religious change among Polish migrants to Ireland. I will present data from empirical research on Polish migrants to Ireland conducted with the use of Random Driven Sampling and data coming from the Institute for Catholic Church Statistics in Poland. I will argue that religious decline in Poland could be explained in terms of discontinuity of religious anamnesis (Hervieu-Leger 1999). Religion decreases because religious experience is no more embodied into local community through reach system of liturgical rituals and symbols.
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Field #1. Congregations in Europe (Thematic)
Field #2. Olav Hovdelien
Field #3. Olav Hovdelien
Field #4. Oslo Metropolitan University
Field #5.
Field #6. Filadelfiakirken in Oslo: A Norwegian Megachurch
Field #7. The growth of megachurches is a distinct feature of contemporary Protestantism, and represents one of the most notable changes inside Christianity to have taken place in recent decades. The term 'megachurch' is often defined as a Protestant congregation that has at least 2,000 weekly participants attending its church services. They have been particularly widespread in North America and Asia, but now they are found in all parts of the world. They are congregational evangelical churches, often led by a council of elders and headed up by a pastor or pastor couple. This article turns the spotlight on Filadelfiakirken in Oslo, Norway's largest free church congregation. The problem for discussion in this study can be expressed as follows: What characterises Filadelfiakirken as a megachurch in respect of its outreach activities? The empirical material has been collected in the form of participant observation. Megachurches are outreach organisations which are partly dependent on transparency and trust among its members, in its dealings with the local community, and in the broader sense with the rest of society. In his book Religion in Advanced Industrial Society, Beckford demonstrates how contemporary religious forms of expression are influenced by the social context to which they belong. However, it is not clear how the social context affects mega churches. The have emerged in countries that are characterised by different degrees of industrial and economic development, urbanisation, prosperity development, social inequality, crime and insecurity, etc.
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Field #1. Living well together in religious diversity
Field #2. Jessica Pratezina
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Victoria, British Columbia
Field #5.
Field #6. Cult Cure Culture: Social and Therapeutic Interventions with Children in New Religious Movements
Field #7. The study of new religious movements (NRMs) has traditionally been the domain of sociologists. This means that helping professionals are without guidance from their own field when they encounter those whose faith is seen as controversial. Therapists and social services workers do not often discuss how to work wisely with children and families involved with NRMs. The little research available from a helping perspective relies heavily on viewing those involved with fringe religions as “brainwashed cult members.” This framing does not adequately address the complexity of NRM experiences, presumes those involved are in need of curing or rescuing, and that former members primarily view their experiences as harmful. In order to provide better care, the study of childhood experiences in NRMs should extend beyond sociology and into social service research. Children living in and exiting from NRMs should receive care that takes their faiths, cultures, and lived experiences seriously. Interventions should be grounded in research that is respectful and robust. This paper will give a brief overview of NRMs as transgressing or illegitimate religions, and show how this social/political framing has impacted the work of helping professionals. Brainwashing and the presumption of harm are discussed as part of the dominant therapeutic discourse. Working from a social constructionist perspective, a strengths-based framework for practice with children in/leaving NRMs is offered as an alternative to the deficit model that dominates the helping professions.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Ivan Zabaev
Field #3. Elena Prutskova
Field #4. St.Tikhon's Orthodox University
Field #5.
Field #6. Analysis of four major Christian denominations in Russia through the Weberian theoretical framework: development of the "Humility and Calling Scale"
Field #7. Weber’s famous work “Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism” has been widely applied in sociological research. One of the main factors, which Weber paid attention to, was the Protestant ethic of calling / vocation. The main ethical concept which shapes the lives of Orthodox Christians is humility (Zabaev, 2015). We extend the original Weberian approach and make the concept of economic ethics relevant for studying all major Christian denominations – not only Catholic and Protestant, but also Orthodox. We develop and evaluate a scale of calling and humility (the main ethical categories of the Weberian dichotomy “asceticism / mysticism”). The scale is applied in a quantitative survey of parishioners of four Christian denominations in Russia (1200 respondents) in 2017-2018: Orthodox, Catholic, “traditional” Protestant (Lutheran, Baptist, etc…), and “new” Protestant (Pentecostal). There are a lot of scales which evaluate the Protestant ethic of calling / vocation (Miller, Woehr, & Hudspeth, 2002), and several scales of humility (McElroy, 2017; Worthington, 2017), but our scale is the first in which these two concepts are evaluated against each other within a common theoretical framework. The scale includes two additional concepts which allow differentiating humility and calling from empirically relatively close, but theoretically quite distant concepts – i.e. ressentiment and careerism (Scheler, 1972). Our conceptualization of humility is based on theological, rather than psychological approach, which makes the scale more relevant for studying particularly religious ethics. The scale is evaluated via Confirmatory factor analysis, the differences across the major Christian denominations are discussed.
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Field #1. To leave or to stay. Transition to adulthood and religious belonging
Field #2. Ann Kristin Gresaker
Field #3.
Field #4. KIFO Institute for Church, Religion and Worldview Research
Field #5.
Field #6. Post-confirmation – exit or transit?
Field #7. Although most young people in Norway choose to be confirmed in the Church of Norway, many of them lose contact with the church during their adolescence and in the transition to adulthood. On the one hand, the church has few arrangements addressed to young people after their confirmation, compared to what the church offers to children. On the other hand, as they reach the age of 16 and older Norwegian youth are less involved in organized leisure activities, including activities in religious organizations. Previous research finds that those between 18-34 years are less concerned with Christian faith and practices and to a lesser extent experience a feeling of belonging to the church compared to older people. Arguably, life phase plays a role in religious practice and participation, especially when young people change their environment in relation to moving out of home due to studies etc. However, generational factors should also be considered as the society Norwegian young people grow up in today is more secular and religious diverse than it was before. Based on interviews with young adults who have been confirmed in the Church of Norway, this paper seeks to explore their relationship to the church today and their religious identity. The paper asks, is the post-confirmation period an exit phase in which one discards contact with the church or is it a transitional phase that leads to a new form of relationship to the church and to a new "adult" religious identity?
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Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. David Koussens
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Sherbrooke
Field #5.
Field #6. La nouvelle laïcité du Centre d’action laïque belge
Field #7. Cette communication propose d’observer les déplacements opérés par le Centre d’action laïque, structure francophone de la laïcité organisée en Belgique, dans sa définition de la laïcité au cours des vingt dernières années. Partant d’une observation de la mobilisation de la laïcité dans les productions écrites du Centre d’action laïque relatives à ses « engagements laïques » sur la période 1999-2019, la recherche a voulu questionner dans quelle mesure son idéal laïque se serait sécularisé tant dans son vocabulaire que dans les engagements qu’il implique, n’étant plus nécessairement déterminé par son rapport au religieux. L’analyse a porté sur les rapports annuels d’activités et les mémorundums du Centre d’action laïque, ainsi que sur les articles publiés dans la revue Espaces de libertés publiés depuis 1999. Elle révèle comment la production écrite du Centre d’action laïque se distancie progressivement d’une laïcité construite en opposition, mais aussi et peut-être en miroir avec le cléricalisme, pour se placer sur des terrains alors inconnus de la laïcité (sport, drogue, prostitution etc) afin de mieux réactiver une laïcité philosophique qu’un seul positionnement face au religieux ne peut plus toujours justifier.
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Field #1. Gender and Religion: Correlates and Causes
Field #2. Elena Chernyak
Field #3.
Field #4. Hartwick College
Field #5.
Field #6. Gender, religion & culture: Women in Russia and the Russian Orthodox Church
Field #7. Religion is critical for the formation of any society as it conveys values and belief systems to members of that society through texts and its interpretations, traditions, teachings, and doctrines. The present research discusses the role of the Russian Orthodox Church, the predominant religion in Russia, on forming Russian society and national character and its influence on different spheres of secular life, specifically related to women, their experience and status. Russian religious culture has left its mark on every cultural domain in the nation. Particularly, gender ideology in Russia is formed and reinforced by the teaching of the Russian Orthodox Church and have mainly been based on the interpretation of the New Testament by the Russian Orthodox clergy. Gender roles and the perception of family and marriage are understood in compliance with the values of the Russian Orthodox faith, according to which the purpose of marriage is the birth and raising of children. The women’s duty is to care for her husband and children since these are the only way of the woman’s service to society and to God. A significant impact on women status in Russia had a book Domostroi, written by the monk Silvestr in the XVI century, which emphasized the patriarchal family model, the need of women to obey their husbands, and justified physical violence against women as punishment for women’s misbehavior. The ideas, traditions, moral values and principles of the Russian Orthodoxy were absorbed by the literature and folklore which have a crucial impact on forming people's spirituality and affect gender roles and relations. Thus, the status of women in Russia is strongly impacted by patriarchal perceptions drawn on religious doctrine, women are not only viewed subordinate to their male counterpart but also bereft free will, autonomy, and independence.
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Field #1. Social Movements, Rebellions and Revolutions through Religious Contention
Field #2. Shirley Le Penne
Field #3.
Field #4. Tel Aviv University
Field #5.
Field #6. One state, One people – One Secularism? Understanding Secularism in Tunisia with Saba Mahmood’s Religious Difference in a Secular Age
Field #7. In the wake of the Arab Spring, secularism has returned to the heart of Tunisian public discourse, once monopolized and authorized only by the state. And in the interplay between the state, the secular and the religious, one ingredient that has gone missing for a while – the people – has been brought back on stage, turning from a non-state actor into a state-inherent one. The reentry of the people into the public sphere evinced that without a people, there can be no state, let alone a secular one. However, when the Jasmine Revolution resulted in the election of an Islamic party, Ennahda, nominated during the first democratic elections held at the aftermath of the revolution, scholars and politicians voiced their concerns about the future of secularism in Tunisia. Was Ennahda’s ascendance for the better or the worst? How does the nomination of an Islamic party affect our understanding of Tunisia’s secularism, if at all? In this context of changes and frustrations, is secularism sustainable? To answer these questions, I will use Saba Mahmood’s theory from Religious Difference in a Secular Age. Proposing an alternative narrative of secularism, Mahmood defines secularism not merely as the idea of separation of state and church, but as a statecraft ideology whose aim is to interfere into the realm of the religious to manipulate and control it. Defining secularism as a “universal project” and claiming there is only one secularism, Mahmood’s theory may fit, but also be challenged by, the Tunisian case.
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Field #1. Pope Francis, Religious Authority and the Media
Field #2. Silvia Rodrigues
Field #3. Bruna Carvalho
Field #4. Pontifícia Universidade Católica (PUC) São Paulo/Brasil
Field #5.
Field #6. Pope Francis and gender ideology: Reverberation in the Catholican brasilian media.
Field #7. From the spontaneous personal attitudes of Pope Francis’s personal acceptance of sexual morality matters, the mass media contribute to generate a social expectation of doctrinal change in the Catholic Church. However, the Pontiff’s standings in the official documents concerning sexuality remain the same as the institution. This presentation intends to show how the Pontiff’s official statements construct the so-called gender ideology in an accusatory category. Category which, on one hand, systematically disqualifies the analytical corpus of the gender studies, built up interdisciplinarily over the decades. On the other hand, gender ideology has become a real threat to the Family morals in the Catholic hierarchy. From a netnographic clipping, we will discuss how the construction of this threat and the accusatory diffusion of the gender issues intensely reverberate in the Catholic electronic media. Thus, we propose to discuss the way that the official standing is decodified in the mediatic language, reinforcing institutional positions in certain sectors of the Brazilian Catholicism
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Field #1. Media dynamics of nationalism and religion
Field #2. Simon Mastrangelo
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Bern
Field #5.
Field #6. The Israel-Palestine conflict portrayed as a religious conflict. Representations and discourses on Facebook
Field #7. The Israel-Palestine conflict is one of the most frequently discussed issue in the international media. How is it articulated, used and abused? My goal is to study the instrumentalization of this conflict in an original way by looking at the ‘new’ media on the Internet, more specifically at Facebook. I do that by analyzing the images (cartoons, drawings, photos), videos (religious sermons, political discourses, TV-reports), articles and comments that are published on this online platform. Israel-Palestine is a region that has a very high symbolic importance for Abrahamic beliefs. It is therefore not surprising that religion is one of the frames that is most frequently convened on Facebook to speak about the conflict going on in this region. In this paper, I will focus on the multiple ways the Israel-Palestine is depicted as a religious conflict and will give some insights from my ongoing post-doctoral research combining social media analysis with ethnographic fieldwork.
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Field #1. Major Transformations in Latin American Religious Practices: Globalization, Transnationalization, and Pentecostalization
Field #2. Manéli Farahmand
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Lausanne
Field #5.
Field #6. New Age Maya-Seeking Movements Through a Transnational Lens
Field #7. This communication is dedicated to the study of identity issues in contexts of renewal or appropriation of Latin American ethnic traditions and their displacement, by specific actors, within the realm of New Age spiritualities. These issues revolve around quests for authenticity, legitimacy and negotiation of (intra-)cultural differences. The communication will problematize, more specifically, the relationships among transnationalism, the New Age and Maya ethnicity, from the perspective of Transnational Studies, through the concept of “neo-Mayanity”. These relationships have been embedded in the broader historical context of the construction of ethnic categories in Central America since the 1960s and the growing importance, at the end of the 1990s, given to “Maya cosmovisions” in identity processes in Guatemala and Mexico. These debates over ethnicity allow us to thematize the recent emergence of so-called “neo-ethnic” movements in relation with transnationalization. We will therefore survey the anthropological literature on these “neo” phenomena as well as issues of power, authenticity and legitimacy involved by their transnationalization. This communication aims to show current transformations in the field of “Maya ethnicity”, ever since contact with globalized New Age spiritualities. A variety of empirical examples reveal that since the “2012 Phenomenon”, the accelerated transnationalization of neo-Maya leaders has led to innovations of symbolic and ritual contents through processes of rearrangement. We will see the consequences of these processes on the classical boundaries of ethnicity and the emergence of a growing universalization of the “Maya” figure, associated with a “primordial energy”.
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Field #1. Singing, Ritualising and Memory Making
Field #2. Andreia Vicente
Field #3.
Field #4. Unioeste
Field #5.
Field #6. Praise as a locus of ritual changing
Field #7. Among the Brazilian Pentecostals, moments of praise can be taken as privileged locus for understanding ritual change. In the Assemblies of God Churches, for example, a number of factors evidence this transformation: the renewal of the gifts of the Holy Spirit, the increasingly emotional praises, the movement of bodies, shaken arms, shaking heads, raised faces. The objects also show transitions and conviviality: it is noticed that the screen and the cellular used to sing "corinhos" coexist with traditional objects like the Christian harp in which there is a traditional sequence of "hymns". Feelings, body techniques and objects evidence that the moment of praise is increasingly a time to let the "power of holy spirit flow." Based on data from the field work carried out in Churches Assemblies of God in Toledo and in Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil and from a bibliographic debate driven by the concept of sensorial and ritual forms, I propose to reflect on the following question: why certain media are accepted contemporaneously as components of worship and identified with the sacred, while others are questioned and even refuted? As I pretend to argue, these processes unfold from the creation of aesthetic formations that involve not only the body and the technological supports but also cosmological, ritual and hierarchical elements.
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Field #1. Socio-anthropology of Salafism in Europe
Field #2. Gritt Klinkhammer
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Bremen, Institute of The Study of Religion
Field #5.
Field #6. Young Male Salafis in Germany – ticking bombs? A Biographical Approach
Field #7. Approaches to Islamic radicalization ultimately aim at getting to know “what is going on before the bomb goes off” – as Sedgwick puts it in a nutshell (2010). Therefore several researchers formulated process theories of religious radicalisation, which try to identify principal triggers of becoming an extremist. I would like to go a step back and look at the beginnings of becoming a Salafi, even if not every Salafi will throw bombs, in order to understand the attraction as well as the circumstances which influences the convert’s attention to such a socially deviant and uncomfortable ideology. During a one-year fieldwork in a small male Salafi community in Germany by an assistant of my working group there also have been conducted several biographic, narrative interviews. The presentation will show the reconstructive analysis of three of these interviews. Therein, the narratives show parameters of conversion to Salafism (Islam-Salafi or Christian-Salafi) which explain the social position of the new believers. Moreover the interviews give insides into special negotiations, battles and (in-)competencies of the believers with their social environment. Thus, the attraction of Salafism can be understood in its complex dynamics within its special social setting.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Francesco Molteni
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Milan - Department of Social and Political sciences
Field #5.
Field #6. People changing or changing people? Generational effects and religious evolution in Europe
Field #7. When dealing with the issue of religious change, there is no clear consensus about whether European religious landscape is changing because people change or because a change of people. The literature refers to a period effect when some events affect many people who change their religious behaviour. It refers instead to a cohort effect when individual religiosity is mainly considered as the result of formative experiences being the societal change thus related to youngest cohorts replacing older ones. In addition, the effect that people ageing has on religiosity puts extra complexity in the attempt to disentangle these effects both from a theoretical and empirical point of view. The use of DAGs represents a useful way to frame these theoretical puzzles and to identify the best modelling strategy. Using a graphical representation of how cohorts, periods and age interact in explaining individual religiosity, we frame the theoretical puzzle in a way which is theoretically robust and statistically feasible. Starting from this, we take advantage of the cumulative dataset CARPE (which covers 45 countries for the period 1970-2016 and the 1900-1990 cohorts) to disentangle the effect of periods succession and cohorts replacement in explaining societal-level religious change. Results from cross-classified multilevel models show how the change in religious practice in Europe is mainly a matter of cohort replacement. Moreover, this long-time trend takes a clear logistic shape, meaning that we are observing a population dynamic which is common to many other demographic changes.
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Field #1. Religious authority, political participation, and the Internet
Field #2. Samira Tabti
Field #3. Frederik Elwert
Field #4. Ruhr University Bochum/CERES
Field #5.
Field #6. “Textual Authority in the Salafi Online-Forums: The Importance of Islamic Texts for Negotiating Everyday Life”
Field #7. Salafist online communities are a global phenomenon of increasing importance: a great number of Salafi online forums appeared recently in various languages. Despite its growing popularity, the concept of “Salafism” cannot always be defined or categorized unambiguously. Within Salafism itself, there are various groups and orientations, which hold different opinions on specific topics. My paper focuses on a specific German Salafi online community and my interest centers mainly on the processes of religious authorization used in their respective forum. My presentation will explore whether these discourse spaces enable the development of new forms of religious authority, which serve as counterparts to institutional traditional authorities. The paper will advance that these new forms of religious authority are becoming increasingly important on the internet. Online participants to these forums have now the possibility of discussing forms of traditional knowledge about religious rituals, religious doctrine and ways of living. They can also review and examine it without the guardianship of parents, teachers and imams. The paper suggests understanding Salafist online forums as networks that produce, establish and disseminate these new forms of knowledge. It will also argue that possessing knowledge (“authentic knowledge”), linguistic skills, and technical know-how are all vital elements for establishing religious experts, reflecting the link that exists between knowledge and authority. Knowledge of the Quran and of the Hadiths is an important skill for users to possess in order to climb up the hierarchy of this online community. Those users who are able to answer questions and requests from other users with reference to the Quran and, especially, about the Hadiths, will receive positive ratings and their contributions will serve as references for further debates. Such experts translate text sources, words, etc., or even sometimes provide interpretations that, in turn, are supported by other textual sources. Their endeavor can be regarded as a transformation process, which uses the authority of texts to justify personal statements and grants specific users a higher position in the online-community. In order to understand these processes in such online forums, it is therefore important to look at the key areas of the communicative practices, and to consider the ways in which their members use textual sources.
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Field #1. Towards an empirical analysis of interreligious dialogue
Field #2. Frederique Bonenfant
Field #3.
Field #4. Université Laval
Field #5.
Field #6. Douze heure de spiritualité, une étude de cas d'un dialogue interreligieux québécois.
Field #7. Les 12 heures de spiritualité représentaient, jusqu’en 2017, un cas de dialogue interreligieux dans la ville de Québec particulièrement intéressant à étudier, tant du point de vue historique que du point de vue empirique. L’analyse de son développement sur plus de dix ans permet de mettre en lumière des dynamiques particulières, telles que le glissement des orientations socio-politiques vers des orientations spirituelles individualisées, des modifications dans la visée, dans la clientèle-cible et même dans les thématiques abordées. L’analyse du point de vue des organisateurs et des participants témoigne également de la distance qui sépare parfois les objectifs et les conceptions des personnes impliquées. Des conceptions divergentes et parfois irréconciliables sont entretenues, par exemple, en ce qui concerne la relation à l’altérité, le but du dialogue et l’horizon souhaité dans la pratique. Cette présentation discute les résultats d’une étude de cas portant sur l’activité québécoise des 12 heures de spiritualité, qui permet de mettre en lumière une série d’enjeux concernant la pratique du dialogue interreligieux, en contexte québécois d’une part, mais peut-être aussi dans le contexte plus global de nos sociétés ultra-modernes et fortement sécularisées.
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Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. CHRISTOS TSIRONIS
Field #3.
Field #4. ARISTOTLE UNIVERSITY OF THESSALONIKI
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious Routes and Destinations: A polymorphic social approach
Field #7. This presentation aims a) to describe some of the basic concepts associated with pilgrimages and visits to the religious and spiritual destinations and routes in Greece and b) to explore the contribution of social scientists in explaining the emerged touristic phenomena in the field of religious and spiritual journeys. Greece, is a particularly attractive destination for pilgrims, but also for academic visitors, history and culture travelers, art and nature lovers, and especially for people who seek the authentic experience of a lifestyle that is characterized by "spirituality" and "ascetic ethos". On the other hand, the reli/cultu tourism is now a mixed, new form of tourism that is directly related to the cultural tourism. Furthermore, the coexistence of the Greek Orthodox religious destinations with ancient cultural monuments and natural sight scenes, form a "polymorphic touristic continuum" that deserves the attention of the social analysis. Currently, the various forms of tours and touristic visits to destinations associated with the religious heritage and particularly the orthodox tradition constitute one of the pillars of economic development and a dynamic field of initiatives. For this reason, both the religious aspects and the economic functioning of the touristic phenomenon in Greece will be approached in terms of their social, religious, cultural and economic impact. The presentation concludes with a view that retraces the traditional and the modern ways of spiritual visiting in Greece, sheds light to social and ethical considerations and underlines from an empirical point of view the major social challenges generated by the developing religious tourism trend.
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Field #1. Lived Religion and Museums
Field #2. Marianna Shakhnovich
Field #3.
Field #4. Saint-Petersburg State University
Field #5.
Field #6. The methods of presentation of everyday religion in the exhibitions of the Museum of the History of Religion (Saint-Petersburg): from comparative religion to modern anthropological approach
Field #7. The presentation shows the changings in the paradigms of the presentation of everyday religion in the special museums in Russia. The first museum on the history of religion was founded in Petrograd (Saint-Petersburg) in 1922 for the needs of enlightenment the public on the variety of believes and religious practices. Its exhibition was based on the principals of comparative religion. The museum was very soon into antireligious museum, aimed to demonstrate with the use of religious artifacts the Marxist point of view on the social role of religious institutions in the history of human society. In 1932 the Museum of the History of Religion was founded by prominent anthropologist Vladimir Bogoras, hence the newly born museum was based on the evolutionist approach towards religion. And although the word “history” was in the name of the museum, the approach to exhibiting objects was based on anthropological principles requiring reflection of religious everyday life, “syncretism” (combining traditional beliefs and practices with Buddhism, Christianity or Islam). In modern expositions of this museum various methodological approaches are used: from classical historical expositions to electronic simulations creating the illusion of participation in the ritual in progress.
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Field #1. The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe
Field #2. Manoela Carpenedo
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Kent
Field #5.
Field #6. Examining Jewish rituals among Judaising Evangelicals in Brazil
Field #7. Based on an ethnography conducted between 2013-2015 in Brazil, this paper explores a unique Philo-Semitic case found in Christianity, which fuses beliefs, rituals, and identity claims from both Judaism and Evangelical Christianity. The documented ‘Judaising Evangelical’ community is made up of people from Charismatic Evangelical backgrounds that are now adhering to a variety of practices that are strongly inspired by Jewish Orthodoxy. For instance, this growing community is gradually embracing rabbinic theological understandings, as well as many strict rules and the rituals of Orthodox Jews, such as the dietary restrictions (kashrut), women’s menstrual taboos (niddah rules), male circumcision, strict modesty codes (i.e. women cover their hair with headscarves) and many more – though without any certification/recognition from ‘established’ Jewish communities. Drawing on Durkheim and Halbwachs insights concerning the role of ritual in the construction of collective memory and identity, this paper explores the rationale for the ‘Judaising Evangelical’ adherence to Orthodoxy Jewish ethos and rituals. It suggests that, despite this community's dramatic religious change, their collective incorporation of Jewish ritual and practices cannot be comprehended as a simple linear adoption of Orthodox Jewish rituals and sensibilities. On the contrary, the analysis indicates that such radical religious change is operationalised through a continuous negotiation and cultural hybridisation process, constructed in the continuities and the contradictions of the community’s Christian past, and their Judaising present.
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Field #1. Lived Religion and Museums
Field #2. Lieke Wijnia
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Groningen
Field #5.
Field #6. Living Religion in the Art Museum: Developing a Postsecular Perspective
Field #7. Departing from the broader question what scholars of lived religion can gain from museums as their sites of investigation, this paper particularly explores how contemporary art museums negotiate a place for religion in their displays and outreach. Since their 18th-century emergence, art museums have developed as secular public institutions. Yet, the art world remains strongly invested with religion and spirituality. Artists have never really stopped dealing with religion in their work, religious institutions successfully commission artists to contribute to their liturgical spaces, and audiences attend museums for spiritual motivations. Simultaneously, museums search for ways to integrate their, often politically demanded, societal obligations of greater inclusivity and representation. This includes the social reality of religious diversity. Over the past two decades, religion’s increasing public visibility has been characterized as postsecular. The visual arts have been widely accepted to represent one of the key domains of the postsecular. However, this domain’s postsecular nature is anything but well-defined, let alone effectively operationalized. Therefore, this paper explores various European art museums where negotiations between the secular and religion continuously take place. These negotiations cover topics such as ethics (whether the display of religious art compromises the perceived secular nature of the museum); authority (curatorial transformations and ownership of religious knowledge); and identity (the impact of religious diversity on the rewriting of shared narratives through the displayed art). Tracing negotiations on these topics, the paper argues for an inductive approach to a postsecular understanding of the art museum.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Paul-André Turcotte
Field #3.
Field #4. AFFRESS-AIDOP
Field #5.
Field #6. L'Église nationale dans une petite société
Field #7. L’intérêt de l’étude d’une petite société est de saisir in situ les caractéristiques et le fonctionnement de la société. De même pour l’Église nationale quand on analyse de ses caractéristiques d’après le type-église selon Ernst Troeltsch et Max Weber. Il se caractérise par l'extériorité, en opposition relative à l'intensité du type-secte et à l'intériorité, source d’intensité, du type-mystique. Les médiations objectives y sont privilégiées, dont les pratiques rituelles. De la sorte, le groupement socioreligieux de ce type, dans la suite de son message, vise à intégrer la vie sociale aux premiers degrés d'une rationalisation existentielle, qui prépare à un développement religieux progressif et, par là, à une pénétration de la culture à l’intention de la masse. A cette fin est admise l'adaptation au monde, à ce qui est autre, mais sans l'avaliser en entier, et quitte à pratiquer des transactions allant du spirituel à l’économique et au politique. Nous retrouvons ces traits dans l'Église nationale, laquelle se caractérise par une synthèse concentrique de la religion et de la culture, de concert avec les autres instances sociales. Le corps socioreligieux qu'elle constitue s’apparente au système en tant que totalité organique. Tout à la fois sa composition s’avère plurielle, animée qu'elle est par l'esprit de corps. La régulation conjugue intransigeance et compromis, du coup compose territorialement avec les rapports entre nation, nationalisme et identité culturelle. L’exposé précisera les éléments de cette conceptualisation non d’abord pour eux-mêmes, mais en regard de l’orthodoxie grecque.
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Field #1. Religion in Comics
Field #2. Kambiz GhaneaBassiri
Field #3.
Field #4. Reed College
Field #5.
Field #6. Sufism, Orientalism, and Anxieties of Liberalism in Craig Thompson's Habibi
Field #7. In Orientalist discourse, Sufism has long played a central role in assuaging non-Muslims’ anxieties about Islam as a doctrinaire or political religion that poses a threat to “the West.” Sufism was generally represented by Orientalists as the spiritual dimension of Islam that, in contrast to political forms of Islam, privatized faith and thus accommodated modern capitalism and liberal democracies. While this understanding of Sufism is no longer upheld in the academy, it continues to shape popular conceptualizations of Sufism. This paper explores one such popular representation of Sufism in Craig Thompson’s graphic novel Habibi and situates it within the larger legacy of Orientalist anxieties about Islam. Habibi was published in September 2011 on the decennial anniversary of the attacks of 9/11. It exemplifies one of the ways U.S. society has processed and grappled with al-Qaeda’s attacks on New York and Washington, DC. In this paper, I demonstrate the intricate and complex ways Thompson engages Islam in the politically charged environment of post-9/11 America to show how the legacy of Orientalist approaches to Islam not only delimits the ways non-Muslim Americans and Europeans imagine Muslims, but also blinds them to resources within the Islamic traditions and Muslim-majority societies for addressing the apocalyptic challenges climate change and industrial pollution pose to the globe.
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Field #1. Treating the Dead in the Aboriginal Worlds at the Age of Religious Pluralism
Field #2. Julien Laporte
Field #3.
Field #4. Université Laval, Québec
Field #5.
Field #6. Les esprits des morts (anitos) et leur destin inattendu. Principes ontologiques tao-chrétiens à Pongso no Tao, Taïwan
Field #7. Pongso no Tao, ou « l’Île des personnes », est une île située à près de 60 km au sud-est de Taïwan. Cet archipel est habité par les Tao, une communauté autochtone d’environ 3500 personnes, vivant principalement du tourisme, de l’agriculture et de la pêche. Sous l’époque coloniale japonaise, de 1895 à 1945, Pongso fut transformée en laboratoire anthropologique, interdisant l’accès aux personnes extérieures, à l’exception des missionnaires catholique et presbytériens. Pour les Tao, la mort et les rites funéraires sont des sujets sensibles, qui comportent de nombreux tabous, notamment parce qu’ils sont associés aux anitos, des esprits des morts devenus plus ou moins démoniaques, qui sont responsables des maux des Tao, et également car la mort, qui se déplace par contagion, a sa propre agencéité. Avec la propagation du christianisme, s’observe un enchevêtrement de pratiques et principes onto-cosmologiques tao et chrétiens. Il n’est désormais plus vraiment question de repousser les anitos, mais plutôt d’expulser Satan, et ses disciplines, du corps des possédés. Si l’eau bénite, la Bible et les figures religieuses s’ajoutent aux talismans et aux armes de défense utilisés par les Tao pour repousser ces esprits, comment les Églises catholique et presbytérienne les considèrent-ils dans leurs propres ontologies? Qu’en est-il de l’« Île Blanche », le lieux de repos des âmes?
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Field #1. Secularism as social movement
Field #2. Hugo H. Rabbia
Field #3.
Field #4. CONCIET, IIPSI, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba y Universidad Catolica de Cordoba
Field #5.
Field #6. Non-religious identities in Argentina: visibility, differentiation and perceived social recognition
Field #7. Othering and otherness among religiously unaffiliated from Argentina The number of religiously unaffiliated people have been growing in Argentina during the last decades. “Unaffiliated” refers to a heterogeneous segment of population that includes unaffiliated believers, indifferent, atheists, and “spiritual but not religious”. Each position refers to different ways of living and contesting a social-discursive space of the "non-religious", including collective apostasy actions. Based on in-depth interviews to 22 unaffiliated from Cordoba/Argentina, the study explores their identifications as personal narratives, configured from an inter-group differentiation process between a religious other (“Them”) and a disputed “We”. From a micro-sociological and relational perspective, narratives referred to several daily experiences when feelings of “otherness” have emerged related to instances of visibility of the non-religious identities. These situations enable us to discuss the perceived social recognition of non-religious identities in a context where Christian religious tradition, especially Catholicism, are viewed as predominant but contested.
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Field #1. Singing, Ritualising and Memory Making
Field #2. Duan Yiwen
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Tsukuba
Field #5.
Field #6. Singing in Ritualized Religious Practice: A Study of “Baikaryu Eisanka” of Japanese Soto Zen School
Field #7. Baikaryu Eisanka, normally sung by a group of Soto Zen School monks and believers at a Zen temple, is a kind of Buddhism hymn of Japanese Soto Zen School. Participants learn the teachings by singing Baikaryu Eisanka in praise of Shakyamuni Buddha and the two founders of Soto Zen School named Dogen and Keizan, and to show respect for the ancestors and the past monks. Baikaryu Eisanka began in 1952 at a commemorative activity of the 700th anniversary of Dogen’s death at Shizuoka city. The venue for Baikaryu Eisanka is named as Baikako. According to the statistics by the Soto Zen School, there are currently over 6400 Baikako and over 127 thousand Baikako members in Japan and overseas. In a fixed-form ritual, participants sing the teachings ringing bells, remember the important religious figures, experience emotions released through the ritual singings, and feel themselves connected to the teachings. This draws us to ask how to locate the practice and experience of singing the Buddhist hymn within the context of Zen and how these singings function to provide the experiential framework to construct the cherished memory of the Zen teachers. This paper, based on the author’s fieldwork on several Baikakos of Soto Zen temples in Tokyo, explores the issue of religious soundscape by examining Baikaryu Eisanka singing as a religious phenomenon. It will shed new a light upon an important but not so much studied aspect of Zen Buddhist in the contemporary Japan.
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Field #1. Gender and Religion: Correlates and Causes
Field #2. Nahed Sharary
Field #3.
Field #4. Ben Gurion University
Field #5.
Field #6. The Challenge of Islamic Feminism among Muslim Palestinian Women in Israel
Field #7. This study examines the development of a new feminist discourse among Islamic women in Israel and the challenges it poses in Muslim society. The pioneer research conducted in this context is the first to reveal the religious feminist school of thought, that promulgates its ideas among Muslim women in Israel, describing the challenges inherent in a feminine religious awakening of this type and proposing coping methods accordingly. Development of feminist discourse among Muslim women is dependent on regionwide political, social and religious conditions. In Israel, it is taking shape under the dual control of the Israeli hegemony and patriarchal-religious leaders. The study examines the challenges encountered by these feminists women, in the shadow of the Israeli hegemony and the Islamic patriarchal leaders. Critical Feminist interpretation of religious texts conflicts with the patriarchal version. The Islamic religious activism these women espouse came about following a long period of collusion between the Islamic religious patriarchy and the Israeli establishment to control Sharia law, thereby entrapping women and depriving them of their civil rights. Based on the qualitative paradigm and semi-structured interviews with ten of the organization’s male and female activists, the study revealed that the Feminist Islamic “dialect” addresses several repression structures: (1) State institutions, such as Israel’s Knesset (Parliament). (2) Muslim patriarchal religious politicization that entrench patriarchal control. (3) There is an alliance between State officials and patriarchal and religious establishment gatekeepers, such as Islamic Movement clerics, Sharia court judges.
Field #8.


Field #1. Pope Francis, Religious Authority and the Media
Field #2. Heidi Campbell
Field #3. Alessandra Vitullo
Field #4. Texas A&M University; Bruno Kessler Foundation
Field #5.
Field #6. Francis as a Digital Pope: Reflecting on the Roots and Rise of the Digital Papacy
Field #7. This paper explores the negotiation of the Catholic Church with contemporary media and argues for the emergence of a Digital papacy. Pope Francis has become a cultural icon symbolizing the Catholic engagement with modernity and digital culture, as his image and quotes, have been readily spread virally Internet’s culture. This has generated many nicknames to describe the Pope’s status in popular culture including the “Internet Pope” and the “Digital Pope”. However, we argue Pope Francis and the rise of a digitally literate and engaged papacy is not a new phenomenon, but rather one which is rooted in a historic trajectory of Catholic teaching on social communication beginning in the mid 20 th Century. This paper specifically highlights the important teachings and advocacy of Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict to the construction of Pope Francis’ digital image. Indeed Pope Francis’ characterization rises on and from a longer history of the Catholic Church’s engagement and theological reflection on media technologies. We argue one cannot fully understand or appreciate the Catholic Church’s response to digital media if we do not first considers its philosophy and policies emerging from the Pontifical Council of Social Communication, and the theology of Communication emerging from these three papal offices – and the theologically grounded social communication strategy they co-created. Here we explore the progression of the last three papacies and specific media related teachings, decision-making and practices that have to contributed to, laid the groundwork to the framing of Pope Francis as a “Digital Pope”, and what this historic development tell us about the church and its current relationship to media.
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Field #1. Mobility, ritual and public space. Transnational Catholic scenarios in large cities
Field #2. Verónica Roldán
Field #3.
Field #4. Università Roma Tre
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion and transnationalization. The devotion of the Peruvian community to the Lord of Miracles in Rome.
Field #7. This essay deals with the devotion to Christ crucified, called the Lord of Miracles, by the Peruvian community in a context of transnationalization, specifically in Rome, Italy. The topics of popular religion and national identity will be analyzed, as well as the phenomenon of immigration and transnationalism. The analysis will focus on the diffusion of this veneration in the context of international migration that originated during the 90s of the twentieth century in relation to the processes of globalization, human mobility, internationalization of the labor market and development and access to media and international transportation.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Kees de Groot
Field #3.
Field #4. Tilburg University
Field #5.
Field #6. The Religious Co-production of Public Mental Health Care
Field #7. This paper discusses how the Catholic Church in the Netherlands contributed to the formation of the secular domain of mental health care. This development can be viewed as a liquidation process, i.e., the breakdown of organized religion, but at the same time the proliferation of religious capital in the public domain. This case study provides an historical-sociological account of a religious practice moving outside the religious field to a secular domain that it helped to constitute. It appears that the profoundly secular Dutch system for public mental health care is partly rooted in ecclesial practices. The Christian centers were originally established in order to make pastoral care, often regarding sexual issues, more accessible and professional. The expansion and reform of the care of souls produced a vast field where mental hygiene could be promoted. During the early 1960s, a system for out-patient mental health care started to establish itself, but at the same time the link with organized religion faded. The churches had co-produced a system that tended to operate autonomously, free from ecclesial ties. In the next decades, a negative or indifferent attitude towards religion prevailed among practitioners. What factors have promoted the exclusion of religion in the domain of mental health care? To what extend is contemporary mental health care able to cooperate with or include chaplains, on one hand, and deal with religious issues among clients, on the other?
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Field #1. To leave or to stay. Transition to adulthood and religious belonging
Field #2. Thibault Ducloux
Field #3.
Field #4. Centre Maurice Halbwachs (CNRS-ENS-EHESS)
Field #5.
Field #6. « Ce que mes parents me disaient… » : Le phénomène des réaffiliations religieuses dans les prisons françaises.
Field #7. En France, mais aussi en Allemagne, en Italie ou encore en Suisse, les religiosités carcérales cristallisent toutes les attentions et inquiétudes. Et pour cause. Souvent présentées comme des écoles de l’intégrisme musulman, sinon du jihadisme, les prisons des sociétés européennes semblent nager à contre-courant de la sécularisation occidentale. Plus globalement, il est vrai que les murs des établissements pénitentiaires délimitent des régions du social où s’opère tout particulièrement une vaste reconfiguration du croire : Quelles que soient les obédiences finalement revendiquées, une part substantielle des individus non religieux le deviennent au cours de leur peine de prison. Ce constat est d’autant plus étrange que le nombre des conversions ex nihilo et des changements de religion sont statistiquement négligeables ! En réalité, la vie en prison occasionne une « intensification des régimes faibles » de religiosités (Hervieu-Léger, 1999) et un réinvestissement inédit des traditions religieuses familiales. Or, partant de la sur-visibilité de la référence religieuse en détention, tout porte à croire que ce phénomène concerne des centaines voire des milliers de personnes chaque année. Il faut dire que la vie en prison présente un ensemble de contextes sociaux suffisamment délétères pour mettre en flottement les repères les plus ordinaires de la vie sociale. Ces ruptures biographiques soulignent néanmoins le poids des continuités individuelles et la force silencieuse des socialisations primaires. En effet, les effets des socialisations familiales ne se manifestent pas toujours avec évidence. Penser les dispositions latentes permet ainsi de se dégager de l’antagonisme transmission/échec ou religieux/sans religion. La question devient donc celle de savoir comment se réactivent ces dispositions religieuses « endormies ».
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Uriel Abulof
Field #3. Shirley Le Penne
Field #4. Tel Aviv University
Field #5.
Field #6. “To Be or Not to Be(lieve)?” The Roles of Religion in the Rise and Demise of Ethnonationalism
Field #7. This paper explains the role of religion in the ethnogenesis and ethnonational endurance of three small nations: Israeli Jews, French Canadians and Afrikaners. The paper first expounds four models for the roles of religion in legitimating modern ethnonationalism: (1) nationalism instead of religion (“secular nationalism”), (2) nationalism as a religion (“civil religion”), (3) religion as a resource for nationalism (“auxiliary religion”), and (4) religion as a source of nationalism (“chosen people”). The paper then analyzes the three cases along these four models. First, religion fostered the rise of ethnic identity in all three communities, especially for Jews and Afrikaners, not least via their self-denotation as “chosen peoples.” Second, while 19th century French Canadian elites heavily relied on religion to mobilize population for the ethnic cause, it was subsidiary for Afrikaner national leadership, and marginal for the Jewish (Zionist) project. Third, civil religion was paramount for the 20th century Afrikaner nationalism, auxiliary for Zionism, and antithetic to French Canadian incipient nationalism. Finally, while the perceived relocation of sovereignty from God to the people transpire much earlier for Zionists and Afrikaners, the French Canadians-turn-Quebecois have secularized far more profoundly, as Zionism has increasingly turned to Judaism to alleviate its ongoing legitimacy crisis.
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Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Guillaume Silhol
Field #3. Lucas Faure
Field #4. CHERPA, Sciences Po Aix-en-Provence
Field #5.
Field #6. Prêcher aux convertis et aux laïques : une sociologie comparée de deux militantismes religieux obliques
Field #7. Cette proposition s’inscrit dans le questionnement sociologique sur des formes, parfois paradoxales, d’engagements attestataires vis-à-vis des normes de la laïcité des institutions de l’Etat et de l’espace public, de la part d’acteurs dépendant d’institutions religieuses. En comparant « l’incomparable » (Détienne, 2009), soit une ONG humanitaire islamique en France (le SIF, fondé en 1991) et un syndicat d’enseignants de religion catholique (le SNADIR, fondé en 1993) en Italie, au niveau des carrières militantes, des modes d’action et des motifs dans des grammaires différenciées de la laïcité (Rambaud, 2015), nous proposons d’analyser la construction laïco-compatible d’intérêts et de représentations dits « religieux ». Nous nous appuyons sur nos deux terrains respectifs, à partir d’entretiens qualitatifs, d’observations et d’archives de presse interne. D’une part, les engagements multiples d’acteurs ordinaires montrent que le travail de la laïcisation organisationnelle n’est pas contradictoire avec un renforcement de l’investissement religieux, individuel ou dans d’autres espaces. D’autre part, au niveau mésosociologique, les mobilisations et l’obtention de soutiens au-delà du champ religieux se traduisent en termes de grammaires laïques situées, et en contraintes dans la division du travail militant. Enfin, la comparaison entre un groupe français religieusement « minoritaire » et un groupe italien professionnellement mais non religieusement « minoritaire » invite à ne pas surestimer le caractère subversif de ces engagements, mais de les relier à la circulation d’instruments des politiques de gestion du religieux entre secteurs et entre pays (Portier, 2010).
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Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Antonio Camorrino
Field #3.
Field #4. Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II
Field #5.
Field #6. The sacralization of nature “Geodicy” and ecospirituality in contemporary society
Field #7. The unplanned consequences of the industrialization process (Beck 1986) outline potential apocalyptic scenarios where the human species would be at risk of extinction. At least, a radical redefinition of the forms of social organization seems to be at stake. This apocalyptic eventuality – the threat of Climate Change menaces the safety and the future of everyone – raises questions of “cosmic” extent (Jonas 1979), issues previously concerning exclusively the divine sphere. Modernization seems to cause, instead of happiness and well-being, boundless landscapes of death. For these reasons today an ever-growing number of people preaches a romantic return to nature, increasingly perceived as a sacred entity. In this sense, more and more widespread phenomena related to ecospirituality – or to that set of new movements, practices and beliefs that Bron Taylor (2001) has defined “Earth and nature-based spirituality” – can be understood. It is possible speaking of the success of a “geodicy”: a green salvation narrative in which the centrality of planet Earth replaces that of God. This particular perspective sheds light on various social phenomena of the contemporary world characterized by green rhetoric. The nature referred to in these narratives, however, is often transfigured by a magical thought, by the desire for reconciliation with an Earth with maternal features, in reality never existed in the history of the planet. Discussing the causes and implications of this state of affairs and the processes behind the social construction of this peculiar “reenchanted” imagery is the goal of this paper.
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Field #1. Congregations in Europe (Thematic)
Field #2. Eva Marzi
Field #3.
Field #4. Lausanne's University
Field #5.
Field #6. Les communautés religieuses dans le canton de Vaud et la nouvelle politique religieuse
Field #7. Cette contribution porte sur la confrontation du concept de « communauté religieuse » au terrain. À partir des résultats du recensement des quelques 700 communautés religieuses du canton de Vaud (Suisse) réalisé par le Centre intercantonal d’information sur les croyances (CIC) en 2018, nous observerons comment la communauté religieuse se pérennise avec les luttes pour la visibilité et pour la reconnaissance qui se jouent à l’échelle locale. Reconnaissant uniquement la communauté protestante jusqu’en 2003, le canton de Vaud a accordé, avec la nouvelle Constitution, un statut de droit public à l’Église catholique romaine et un statut d’intérêt public à la communauté juive. En 2015 une nouvelle réglementation est entrée en vigueur donnant droit à toute communauté religieuse établie dans le canton de Vaud d’être reconnue d’intérêt public. Une des conditions pour obtenir ce statut est de remplir les critères de la « communauté ». Prenant le cas des communautés musulmanes et évangéliques, nous verrons comment les enjeux de cette nouvelle loi de reconnaissance ont un impact direct sur les transformations internes des communautés.
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Field #1. Towards an empirical analysis of interreligious dialogue
Field #2. Karsten Lehmann
Field #3.
Field #4. Kirchliche Pädagogische Hochschule Wien
Field #5.
Field #6. From the margins to activism and establishment - Selected Episodes in the international history of Interreligious Dialogue
Field #7. Throughout the last decade, ‘interreligious dialogue / IRD’ has developed into a significant aspect of the present-day religious field. Now, IRD has to become a subject of empirical analysis and analytic de-construction. Sociologists of Religion are in the position to add to the understanding of IRD as a socio-cultural phenomenon. The proposed paper wants to contribute to this agenda using historical data from a research project that has been dealing with selected organizations shaping the developments of modern IRD. It starts with analyses of the founding periods of the World’s Parliament of Religions (1893), the Religiöser Menschheitsbund (1921) and the World Congress of Faiths (1933-1950) and leads up to rather recently founded organizations such as the United Religions Initiative (2000) and the Universal Peace Federation (2005). Along those lines, the paper wants to contribute to the reconstruction of the history of IRD-activities. On the one hand, it will highlight the position of early IRD-activities on the very margins of the religious field. On the other hand, it will allude to two major trends that shape the present-day character of IRD activities: (a) an increasingly activist approach to IRD within wider civil society as well as (b) an increasing establishment of IRD within major religious institutions. In doing so, the paper puts IRD into the wider analytical framework of religions in public space as well as secularization theory. It will be able to contribute to the critical assessment of notions such as ‘representation’ as well as the borders of the religious field.
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Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. Valasik Corinne
Field #3.
Field #4. GSRL/ICP
Field #5.
Field #6. De l’un à l’autre : cas de migrants catholiques en région parisienne
Field #7. Dans le cadre du projet ReliMig cette présentation aura pour objectif de présenter certaines pistes concernant la construction identitaire de migrants, notamment africains dans la région parisienne. Il sera intéressant de comprendre leur vision du catholicisme à l’aune de cette mobilité. Comment se jouent les adaptations ? Quelle est la place de la religion dans leur trajectoire ? Nous nous intéresserons également aux prêtres africains présents dans ce territoire. Existe-t-il une homologie de statut entre ces migrants et ces représentants institutionnels ? Quelle configuration apparaît alors ?
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Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. Hiroshi Yamanaka
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Tsukuba
Field #5.
Field #6. the development of religious tourism in Japan
Field #7. As popularity of less religiously motivated pilgrims of Santiago de Compostela shows us, the boundary between pilgrimage and tourism seems to be blurring in Western Europe. Even in Japan Camino is also getting popular and those who are fond of walking on the route of Camino have formed Japanese fan club of Camino to promote it, though most of them are non-Christians. The object of this paper is to examine the development of religious tourism in Japanese context. In order to understand this issue, we should pay attention to a role of the World Heritage Sites. In Japan there are eleven World Heritage Sites relating to Buddhism and Shintoism, and Christianity, and all of them have been actively utilized as a source of tourism by local governments in which the sites are located. Among them the most interesting case is Nagasaki’s one. In July 2018, Churches and Christian Sites in Nagasaki was designated as World Heritage Site. In response to the decision, the Nagasaki Prefectural Tourist Federation created a new tourism project named “Nagasaki Pilgrimage”. Although there are tourist firms specializing in overseas Christian holy sites like Jerusalem or Lourdes, this is the first production of a tourist package with the term “pilgrimage” focusing on Japanese Christian churches. Nagasaki's case provides an interesting example for examining religious tourism in Japan.
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Field #1. Liberation Christianity in Latin America. Politics, Religion and Spirituality in the Global South
Field #2. Allan Silva Coelho
Field #3.
Field #4. UNIMEP
Field #5.
Field #6. Idolâtrie: catégorie théologique de la critique du capitalisme
Field #7. Comment le concept d'idolâtrie aide-t-il à comprendre le genre de critique du capitalisme formulée par le pape François dans son enseignement? Si les agents du marché économique accusent Francis d'être antisystémique, on peut voir que de telles critiques pontificales vont au-delà d'une certaine tradition catholique anticapitaliste précisément parce qu'elles incorporent le thème de l'idolâtrie. Si Jean-Paul II a utilisé l'expression typique de la théologie latino-américaine habituellement hors contexte, François applique la catégorie avec tout son potentiel critique à l'éthique du système et à sa production de victimes. Dans les études sur l’école de la DEI - Département œcuménique de recherches et dans la tradition de la critique du capitalisme en tant que religion idolâtre, nous parcourons des documents papaux cherchant à modifier l’utilisation de la catégorie "idolâtrie" de Jean-Paul II jusqu’à nos jours, en utilisant dialectique en tant que proposition méthodologique. Cette analyse indique que si le terme était utilisé avec des réserves dans la critique du marxisme, il constitue maintenant un axe important de compréhension des défis de l'évangélisation: la nécessité de défendre la vie des pauvres en tant qu'opposition éthique à la logique du calcul rationnel du profit. Dans cette tension, la conséquence cohérente de la position de François dans la défense du Concile Vatican II nous permet de comprendre et d'intégrer les aspects fondamentaux de la théologie produite par le groupe qui a dialogué autour du DEI.
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Field #1. Hybrid religious identities: methodological implications
Field #2. Peter Nynäs
Field #3. Ruth Illman
Field #4. Åbo Akademi University
Field #5.
Field #6. Methodological observations from a global study of multiple religious identifications
Field #7. This paper presents some main findings from our global mixed-method with young adults in 13 countries worldwide (n= appr. 5000). In this, we could explore the relatively large number of respondents who expressed some form of multiple religious identification. First, we investigate how they claim to belong to some religious groups, communities, or traditions, while simultaneously state that there are additional religious, spiritual, or philosophical communities, traditions, or practices they feel close to and/or reflect their personal views. What are the striking characteristics of these multiples? How can they be categorized? Second, we present raise some theoretical questions and adress how some of these are qualitatively reflected in other parts of our mixed-method. What does different forms of multiples look like when we turned to the subjective religiosities and lived religion? Are there forms of multiples that stand out as particularly interesting and what kind of narratives exemplify these? Third, these observations altogether allow us to finally make some critical methodological observation regarding the character and assessment of multiple religious identifications. Is there a legitimate methodological approach that should be advocated?
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Field #1. Secularism as social movement
Field #2. Robin Isomaa
Field #3.
Field #4. Åbo Akademi University
Field #5.
Field #6. Debating according to Matt: A Critical Discourse-Analytic Approach to YouTube Atheism
Field #7. YouTube is the most popular video-hosting service in the world and atheism has had a strong presence on YouTube for almost a decade. Matt Dillahunty is one of the hosts of the internet atheist call-in show The Atheist Experience and produces videos about religion and philosophy on his personal YouTube channel, which at the time of writing has over 100,000 subscribers. His ‘Atheist Debates’ project currently has almost 1000 supporters on the crowdfunding service Patreon. The focus of this paper is on his ‘debate review’ videos, where he looks at previous debates he has done (usually with Christian apologists) and assesses his and his opponent’s performances, for what he states are ‘educational’ purposes. As Dillahunty is generally viewed by atheists online as a great debater, analyzing his views on debating may provide some insight into how debating and the pursuit of truth are constructed within Anglophone internet atheism. By adapting Norman Fairclough’s three-dimensional framework for critical discourse analysis to the YouTube context, this paper seeks to explore not only what Dillahunty is explicitly and implicitly saying about debating (what, how, and why we should engage in debates), but also the many possible purposes and functions of revisiting old debates in video form.
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Field #1. Gender and Religion: Correlates and Causes
Field #2. Fatma Kenevir
Field #3.
Field #4. Ankara University
Field #5.
Field #6. The Shrine Visits in Muslim Women’s Religiousness
Field #7. The shrines play an important role in Muslim women’s popular religious beliefs. Unlike most religious typology, the wishes and prayers have an important role at Women’s religiousness. Some women try to overcome their daily life struggle by praying or wishing for some solution during the rituals in the shrine. The shrines can be a shelter for Woman in difficult situations that may include: violence, economic problems, family problems, or sickness. Family and economic problems were mostly regarding owning a house, marrying a husband, having a child, or ensuring high grades for the children they already have. For each problem in their life the woman will perform a specific ritual. For Example, if they want to own a home, they put their key in the door handle and turn as if to unlock and open the door of their dream home. When visiting the shrines and performing the rituals they report a relaxed feeling of accomplished and success in their efforts. Women appear to be escaping their problems (life stresses) with these rituals. The rituals serve as both a relaxing therapy and a way to feel assured that their problems will be solved. This study was generated from unstructured interviews with 8 women who came to the ‘Haci Bayram Veli’ shrine in Ankara. People generally come to perform these rituals on Thursdays and the women we interviewed were the housewife, unemployed, or persons from low socioeconomic backgrounds Key Words: Women, Religious Typologies, Shrine, Women Religious, Popular Religious Beliefs
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Field #1. Treating the Dead in the Aboriginal Worlds at the Age of Religious Pluralism
Field #2. Robert Crépeau
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Montréal
Field #5.
Field #6. Agir au nom des défunts. Le retour de la Fête des morts chez les Kaingang du Brésil
Field #7. Les Kaingang, une société amérindienne du Brésil méridional, considèrent le Kikikoj, un rituel de secondes obsèques, comme étant la plus importante manifestation contemporaine de leur identité amérindienne au sein de la société brésilienne. Abandonné pendant une vingtaine d’année, le Kikikoj a de nouveau été réalisé en 2018 après plusieurs années de discussion et de négociation. Cette réactualisation du Kikikoj a été qualifiée de sauvetage par les organisateurs qui craignaient sa disparition définitive. J'examinerai ici le contexte historique, social et religieux de la réalisation de cette performance rituelle. Il s'agira de situer comparativement cette dernière par rapport à des réalisations du rituel dans les années 1990 auxquelles j’ai également eu le privilège de participer. Je discuterai de l’importance de ce rituel qui donne à voir la société Kaingang comme une totalité en dépit de son morcellement, notamment suite à la conversion massive d’une importante partie de la population à diverses dénominations évangéliques et pentecôtistes au cours des deux dernières décennies.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Emanuelle Degli Esposti
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Cambridge
Field #5.
Field #6. From Human Rights to “Shi’a Rights”, and Back Again: Ethics, Sectarianism, and Identity in the Secular Age
Field #7. The globalisation of the notion of “human rights”, where the concept of a universally-applicable moral standard has come to represent “the marker and measure of a global civil society” (Stychin, 2004: 954), is nevertheless deeply rooted in philosophical and political discursive traditions that are a heart “Western, liberal, and individualist” (Peterson, 1990: 308). Where does this Western-dominated conception of human rights leave minority communities – in particular, Muslims and other religious minorities – when it comes to forms of religious or secular self-expression and self-identification? This paper seeks to interrogate the relationship between Muslims minorities and ethical subject formation in the context of today’s secular humanitarian age through the case study of Shi’a minority communities in Europe. In particular, the paper analyses the extent to which the “banalization of moral discourse” (Fassin, 2014: 433) has entered into articulations of Shi’a identity such that a commitment to “human rights” has come to be equivalent to parallel affirmations of “Shi’a rights”. Within the context of escalating global Sunni-Shi’a sectarianism, this paper contends that the rise of normatively-inflected articulations of “Shi’a rights” may also function as an ideological construct that unconsciously works to produce a form of minority sectarian identity that is itself founded on a logic of ethical humanitarianism. In this sense, Shi’a sectarianism in Europe can be understood as a direct (if unconscious) product of the contemporary world, in which globalised norms of justice, equality, humanitarianism, and minority rights are gaining increasing salience and representation across different contexts.
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Field #1. Liberation Christianity in Latin America. Politics, Religion and Spirituality in the Global South
Field #2. Mortaza Shams
Field #3.
Field #4. Centre for Social Justice
Field #5.
Field #6. Faith and politics of hope
Field #7. The role that faith plays in many social realms, more than anything else, can be explained by its reconciliatory nature. However, sometimes it takes more than a traditional reconciliatory role -which seeks to satisfy all parties- to deal with certain situations. Social exclusion is an example par excellence of such situations where playing a traditional reconciliatory role is not sufficient. When it comes to social exclusion, faith, by working within the status quo, might be actively playing a traditional reconciliatory role while unwittingly siding with the dominant against the dominated and therefore acting as a dominative force. As such it is the lack of flexibility in its reconciliatory role, rather than a decisive bias, which is problematic when it comes to the involvement of religion in issues related to social exclusion. The present paper suggests a replacement for the 'cheap reconciliation'. A reconciliation that, more than anything else, is characterised by favouring the dominant group by lowering their costs of domination and strengthening the status quo when dealing with social exclusion. The alternative should be a reconciliation that rejects domination at its core and builds a fair foundation for societal relations based on equal partnership rather than selling the domination to the dominated in a comforting tone. A reconciliation that generates hope for all rather than serving one at the expense of others. Such a proactive reconciliation sees the collective well-being of all as the common ground rather than convincing the powerless to give up on their dreams and happily serve the dominant.
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Field #1. Religion, Gender and Human Rights: The (De)Secularization of Traditional Values
Field #2. Marie-Andrée Roy
Field #3.
Field #4. UQAM
Field #5.
Field #6. Trouble dans le genre dans l’Église catholique canadienne
Field #7. Dans le cadre de cette communication, je m’intéresse aux modalités d’affirmation des valeurs conservatrices au sein de l’Église catholique canadienne à travers les discours et pratiques de l’Organisme catholique pour la vie et la famille (OCVF). Actif depuis une douzaine d’années au Canada, cet organisme, fondé conjointement par la Conférence des évêques catholiques du Canada (CECC) et le Conseil des Chevaliers de Colomb, entend promouvoir la doctrine catholique en matière de morale sexuelle, de dignité de la femme et de vie familiale. Il entraine un déplacement du discours traditionnel de l’épiscopat canadien sur la question des droits des femmes et l’égalité entre les sexes dans la société et l’Église. Comment caractériser ce déplacement? Quels sont les choix doctrinaux qui sont faits pour assurer les fondements de ces discours et de ces pratiques et quels sont leurs modes de déploiement sur la scène politique et religieuse canadienne? Quels sont ses réseaux internationaux privilégiés par l’OCVF dans la nébuleuse catholique conservatrice mondiale et comment ces réseaux interviennent dans l’action de l’OCVF au Canada? Quelle compréhension des femmes et des rapports de sexe se dégage de l’ensemble de ces interventions?
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Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. Marina Rougeon
Field #3. Larissa Fontes
Field #4. UFBA
Field #5.
Field #6. Des brésiliens catholiques à Paris et Lyon. Normes, négociations et multiplicité des appartenances
Field #7. Cette contribution présentera un ensemble de réflexions résultant d’un travail de terrain en cours de réalisation, auprès de migrants catholiques brésiliens dans les villes de Paris et Lyon. Leurs récits et pratiques révèlent à la fois des spécificités jusqu’ici non étudiées qui contribuent à la diversité du catholicisme local, mais aussi des négociations normatives auxquelles ce dernier peut se prêter. D’une part en effet, la « façon » (jeitinho) brésilienne d’être catholique acquiert des résonnances singulières, alors que l’appartenance religieuse de ces migrants au catholicisme n’est pas incompatible avec le spiritisme, voire avec les religions afro-brésiliennes. Au contraire, cette appartenance se révèle multiple, et doit être interrogée en contexte migratoire. Par ailleurs, leur pratique est l’objet de négociations normatives aux vues de leurs situations et conditions sociales, propres à certaines caractéristiques de la société brésilienne : « mères célibataires », familles recomposées, couples divorcés remariés, homosexuels… Quelle place trouvent-ils au sein de l’Eglise et dans quelle mesure contribue-t-elle à leur insertion localement ? Quelle « souplesse » les prêtres et autres acteurs religieux sont-ils prêts à apporter face à ce qui, du point de vue de la doxa, est considéré comme des déviations ou des pêchés ? Quels changements, en termes de valeurs religieuses, leur vécu de la migration en France a-t-il introduit ? Entre acceptation, critique et négociations, les pratiques catholiques de ces migrants brésiliens invitent à soulever un ensemble de questions.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Heiner Meulemann
Field #3. Alexander Schmidt-Catran
Field #4. University of Cologne
Field #5.
Field #6. Secularization – a tendency, but why? What remains when cross-sectional differences are purged from a longi-tudinal analysis
Field #7. Tendencies of secularization have been found abundantly in comparative survey research. Yet the theory of secularization which postulates two macro forces reducing religiosity, differentia-tion and pluralization, has been rarely tested. Using the ESS 2002-2016, the impacts of both on church attendance and self-ascribed religiosity are tested, controlling for individual-level determinants of religiosity – that is, for belonging (cohort and denomination membership) and choice (education, urban residence, marriage, parenthood, and employment) – with multi-level models which separate between from within country effects of the macro variables. Differen-tiation is measured by the Actual Individual Consumption of households, social spending, the employment ratio, and the Gini index; pluralization by the Herfindahl index of denomination-al diversity, the number of TV channels, the percentage of tertiary education and the percent-age of urban population. Without controls for country and individual level effects, there is a negative effect of time on religiosity – a secularization tendency. But controlling for belonging annihilates this effect entirely and strongly reduces individual-level as well as country-level error variances, while additionally controlling for choice does so only slightly; cohort succes-sion has a strong negative effect, and denomination membership increases religiosity as such and specifically. The assumed negative effects of differentiation and pluralization on seculari-zation are rarely confirmed between countries and only once within countries. Secularization theory fares badly in the appropriate longitudinal, and even in the inappropriate cross-sectional perspective. It describes correctly a linear tendency which it is as yet unable to explain.
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Field #1. Field perspective and reverse angle: Politics of fieldwork in religious contexts
Field #2. Riikka Myllys
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Helsinki
Field #5.
Field #6. Knitting meetings as spiritual tribes? Studying everyday religion in the field
Field #7. In this paper I will view fieldwork as a tool to study everyday religion. In particular, I will focus on the questions that fieldwork as a method have raised with regard to the essence and place of religion in current European religious climate and how it should be described and defined in academic discussions. The paper is based on my doctoral research where I am studying craft-making as women’s everyday religion. The study is qualitative, and the data is collected by observing four craft-making groups for one year as well as interviewing sixteen crafting women from these groups. Groups included both religious/non-religious and charity/non-charity groups. This paper focuses on fieldwork and it mainly discuss methodological issues, but also the results of the study – two things that are also often closely intertwined. I found out that the place but also the essence of religion varied between the groups: it was more public or more private, or even hidden, depending on the group and it got ritual, ethical, and experiential expressions. Based on the interviews I have also found out that craft-making itself was given different kinds of religious and spiritual meanings. In this paper I will ask what the boundaries of fieldwork are when studying religion: what is the religion we are studying and how is it observed? What are the political and ethical issues when religion is studied in field in current European context where religion is private thing? And finally, how everyday religion can be studied in the field?
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Charles Mercier
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Bordeaux/Institut universitaire de France
Field #5.
Field #6. Les Journées mondiales de la jeunesse : des révélatrices du rapport au religieux des sociétés de culture catholique ?
Field #7. Comme une éruption volcanique projette en surface les matériaux que cachent les entrailles de la terre, les événements mettent souvent à jour des aspirations ou des dispositions latentes, invisibles en temps normal. En ce sens, les Journées mondiales de la jeunesse (JMJ), des rassemblements religieux internationaux de jeunes organisés par l’Église catholique tous les deux ou trois ans depuis 1985, dans des villes à chaque fois différentes, peuvent permettre d’éclairer différemment des enquêtes d’opinion le rapport au catholicisme des sociétés de tradition catholique. Dans cette communication, focalisée sur les éditions de Paris (1997) et de Toronto (2002), il s’agira d’étudier la conscience religieuse des sociétés française et québécoise telle qu’elle s’est manifestée durant les quelques journées qu’ont duré le festival. Le succès des JMJ manifeste-il un nouveau régime de religiosité chez certains jeunes, qui privilégieraient une spiritualité pèlerine basée sur la conversion personnelle aux dépens de la logique d’héritage religieux? Quels sont les ressorts de la mobilisation ? Qu’est-ce que le traitement médiatique de ces fêtes globalisées révèle de l’imaginaire religieux des journalistes ? Qu’est-ce que la réaction des populations, confrontées à la JMJ sans l’avoir choisi, nous dit du capital de sympathie dont bénéficie ou non le catholicisme dans ces deux sociétés sécularisées ?
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Monica Simeoni
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Sannio (Benevento) Italy
Field #5.
Field #6. Populisms, illiberal democracies and religions in a number of European countries
Field #7. The most recent analyses of diverse modalities of European (and not only) neo-populism have introduced some new interpretational elements: the disintermediation of traditional representations entities (from political parties to trade unions), the strengthening of the executive, as well as recourse to referenda as expressions of direct democracy as opposed to parliamentary representation. Already, in the late 1990’s, S. N. Eisenstadt, in his Paradoxes of Democracy, foregrounded the idea of the deconsolidation of democracy due to the weakening of its institutional bases. This new state of affairs may be defined as illiberal democracy: democracy, that is, devoid of rights and /or rights devoid of democracy (Y. Mounk). This is how matters stand in Poland and Hungary, where political parties and systems are characterised by moral issues (typical of populist parties) and exploit religion too from a nationalistic and sovereignist perspective. Thus, the struggle between Good and Evil becomes a political category (B. Stanley 2016).
Field #8.


Field #1. Religious Minorities: Muslims in the West and Minorities in the Islamic Societies
Field #2.
Field #3.
Field #4. CNRS
Field #5.
Field #6. Les Juifs de Constantine de 1795 à 1830
Field #7. Nous disposons d’une source unique et exceptionnelle, mais circonscrite, de documents: les registres «matrimoniaux» des rabbins de Constantine entre 1795 et 1929. Ces registres contiennent une information qui n’a jamais été exploitée : 5000 à 6000 contrats passés devant des rabbins, où sont décrits les contenus des trousseaux composant les dots des futures épouses, depuis 42 ans avant l'arrivée des Français à Constantine jusque 92 ans après leur installation et la transformation progressive des Juifs indigènes en citoyens français de plein droit. Ces archives comblent un manque. Elles nous permettent d’étudier l’évolution des rapports de la communauté juive avec les pouvoirs en place : ottoman, puis ottomano-français, puis français. La communication portera sur les résultats en cours.
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 2
Field #2. Astrid Krabbe Trolle
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Copenhagen
Field #5.
Field #6. The sociology of morals: Historical lessons and contemporary trajectories
Field #7. Emile Durkheim framed his corpus of sociological writings as different parts of an overall sociology of morals. For Durkheim, morality was essential for society as such, something that bound the individual to the collective by way of disciplinary obligation and voluntary desirability (Durkheim 1965[1906]). With his sociology of morals, Durkheim also advocated for studying morality as a social fact, similar to and overlapping with religion. Recently, the study of morality and ethics has seen an upsurge in anthropology (Laidlaw 2013, Lambek 2010, Robbins 2016, Zigon 2007) as well as sociology proper (Bargheer & Wilson 2018), posing the question where morality is in the sociological study of religion? What can we gain by focusing on morals in the religious practice of the people we study? In this presentation, I trace morality as an object of study in the sociology of religion, arguing that disciplinary boundary work against theology in combination with a Durkheimian understanding of religion have limited the scope of sociological analysis in terms of morals. By studying morality as something integrated in religion yet with a different social use, we may gain new empirical insights that can expand the theoretical horizon of our social theories.
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Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Emerson Giumbelli
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
Field #5.
Field #6. The politics of religious monumentalization
Field #7. What are the forms of presence and expression of religions in the urban landscape? This issue will be addressed starting from the finding that there is a process of religious monumentalization in Brazilian towns. Monumentalization is a term that covers both religious monuments in the strict sense and large-scale religious buildings. Proceeding the analysis makes it necessary to take into account the variable of religious diversity without assuming that different religions have the same forms and impulses of expression. For that, it will be considered: Catholicism (majority religion), Protestantism (more specifically, Pentecostalism, a rising religion) and African-Brazilian religions (minority religion). Two factors are fundamental to a due approach of religious diversity: modes of display and positions of power. Some cases of each religion will be selected for illustrate general trends. They can be summarized as follows: the affirmation of Catholic hegemony through colossal religious monuments which depend on overexposure and acquire non-religious meanings; the Protestant reaction by means of the construction of mega temples that circumvent an accusation of idolatry; the African-Brazilian resistance through marginal structures that dialogue with an aesthetic of concealment. If we agree that monumentalization is a relevant form of intervention in the urban space, understanding its politics is fundamental to a debate about the architectures that impact cities.
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Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Felipe Gaytán
Field #3.
Field #4. La Salle University México
Field #5.
Field #6. Urban geographies of heaven on earth: Religious altars as spatial markers of identity in Mexico City.
Field #7. Urban geographies of heaven on earth: Religious altars as spatial markers of identity in Mexico City. In various Latin American cities such as Mexico City, the construction of religious altars in the urban space has multiplied, occupying streets without any permission from the local authority. The placement of these altars by the neighbors fulfills the main function of being architectural markers of the urban space that defines the identity and belonging of a neighborhood in front of the indifferent anonymity caused by the megalopolis. In this study we defined a typology of altars according to their architecture and social function. In principle we start with three types: • religious altars of neighborhood identity; • cenotaphs, simulation of tombs placed in the public space and, unlike the altar, is a private marker. • humilladeros, spatial markers that delimit the territory and protect from the evil that exists outside. The humilladeros were used in France and Spain in previous centuries as the delimitation of the border between the town and the forest, between the man and the wolf. Today these types of altars represent tensions between the religious, the social and the political, because they illegally occupy the urban space and the local authority tries to remove them. This paper presents research results between an architectural and sociological analysis based on typologies derived from the use of social proxemia to understand the religious and social sense of the altar in the urban space of a megalopolis such as Mexico City.
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Field #1. To leave or to stay. Transition to adulthood and religious belonging
Field #2. Francesco Cerchiaro
Field #3.
Field #4. Ku Leuven University (Belgium)
Field #5.
Field #6. “Dilution” or “reshaping”? Ethnic and religious identifications amongst offspring of “Christian-Muslim” couples
Field #7. Research on inter-ethnic and interreligious marriages assumes that they tend to cause both ethnic and religious “dilution” and “loss”. The processes of parenting and transmissions are thus at stake to understand what does entail growing up in a family where parents have different cultural, faith and ethnic background. Through life stories and ethnographic observation collected during eight years of empiric researches with “Christian-Muslim” families in Italy, France and Belgium, the paper explores offspring’s religious and ethnic identities. These couples represent an emblematic case study of “mixedness” since they incorporate more layers of differences: religious, as the two partners are socialized into both Islam and Catholicism, ethnic, as a white partner from the majority group is married to a non-white immigrant partner. Despite this interplay between different levels of differences, in public and, often, in academic debate, religious difference is often assumed as the mainly conflictual dimension between the partners. This paper seeks to counter the assumption according to which there is a univocal process of “loss” or “dilution” among “mixed” offspring suggesting that their identities are much more complex and characterized by a reshaping, rather than a loosening, of ethnic and religious boundaries.
Field #8.


Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Francesco Piraino
Field #3.
Field #4. KU Leuven
Field #5.
Field #6. A Sufi Network in the Transnational Public Sphere
Field #7. In the history of Islam, Sufi masters and their followers have often been linked to power inasmuch religious authorities and/or as charismatic figures. During the 20th century, Sufi brotherhoods in the Maghreb survived many attacks by Arab nationalists, Islamists and colonial authorities. New charismatic figures have given Sufism a renewed life, attracting followers from different social and cultural backgrounds. In this presentation, I will show how these Sufi orders adopted new forms and created a network with a strong presence in the transnational public sphere. I will focus on the following Sufi orders: Alawiyya, Budshishiyya, Tijaniyya, Ouazaniyya, Naqshbandiyya. The Sufi network is composed of: 1) religious authorities; 2) intellectuals: historians, anthropologists, scientists; 3) artists; 4) political actors; and 5) “friends” and sympathisers, both Sufi and non-Sufi. The countries included in the network are mainly Morocco, Algeria, France, Belgium, and secondly Niger, Spain, Italy, Turkey and the United States. This is a transnational phenomenon, although mainly francophone. The Sufi network takes place in zawiyas, festivals, and universities. Drawing from a fieldwork conducted in Algeria, Morocco, France and Belgium between 2012 and 2018, I will describe the objectives of this network. Its main aims are: 1) to present another image of Islam, in order to fight Islamophobia in Europe and Islamism in North Africa; 2) to embody a moral force for societies (Muslim and non-Muslim); 3) to train new imams; 4) to foster interreligious dialogue; and finally, 5) to promote a discussion within the Islamic community. This network promotes pluralism, democratic engagement, respect for differences, women’s rights and ecology. At the same time, it mainly addresses an elite within the society, unable to understand social inequalities, especially in the Maghreb context. Moreover, in Morocco, the proximity of many Sufis to the political power challenges this democratic commitment.
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Field #1. Religious authority, political participation, and the Internet
Field #2. Ekaterina Grishaeva
Field #3.
Field #4. Ural Federal University
Field #5.
Field #6. To be in touch with Church. Mediatization of local Orthodox communities of Russian Orthodox Church
Field #7. The subject of my study is groups moderated by local Orthodox communities on the Russian social media VKontakte.com. The goal of the research project is twofold. Firstly, I analyse if the moderation of groups may introduce some changes within social structure of Orthodox community. For example, do webmasters gain social capital that they did not have before they run group moderation? Do activities related to media provide female community members with more agency? Secondly, I study if the use of social media may challenge religious hierarchy. I use Nick Couldry’s socially oriented theory of mediation as methodological background. The project is still in progress, and I would like to put forward two points based on the collected data. In the Russian Orthodox Church (the ROC) there is an implicit separation between male and female work. In contrast the work with social media cannot be framed as typical male or female, as all community members actively contribute to the group moderation if the have media skills. So, the work with social media opens new perspectives for females inside the church and it can be considered as a kind of social elevator within the social structure of community. In some cases the public visibility which Orthodox communities attain by using social media triggered conflicts with other communities and in some cases with higher hierarchy of Diocese. From this perspective media capital gives more independence for local communities and can potentially introduce changes to the structure of the ROC.
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Field #1. Religious authority, political participation, and the Internet
Field #2. Natalia Dusacova
Field #3.
Field #4. Russian State University for the Humanities
Field #5.
Field #6. Narrative of a Religious Leader on Facebook: The Case of Old Believers
Field #7. In my paper I’m going to show how a religious leader creates the space of the new visibility of religion on Facebook and what impact it has on the way parishioners approach social media. As was demonstrated by H. Campbell, religious authority is one of the factors determining the ways social media can be used by different confessional communities [Campbell H. When religion meets new media. Abingdon: Routledge, 2010]. I’m going to analyze the narrative of the Old Believer priest on the official page of the Old Believer community of Chisinau (Moldova). The page is moderated by the priest and reflects the activities of the official church. The leader’s posts can be seen as an extension of religious practices (for instance, he puts the video of a religious service on Facebook page of a confessional community after the worship service in church). It’s significant to note that usually non-Old Believers can only observe worship service from the porch of the church, it is often prohibited to take pictures during the worship service. On Facebook page moderated by the priest there are no such limitations: every follower can see professional photos, watch videos of religious service. So does a religious leader in any way guard group boundaries? Does he approve of discussions between different religious traditions on his page? What are the effects of his moderation of this page for the followers-Old Believers?
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Marie-Pier Beauséjour
Field #3.
Field #4. Université Concordia
Field #5.
Field #6. Église catholique et entreprise funéraire : la question des rituels funéraires dans la société québécoise contemporaine
Field #7. Au Québec, dans un contexte où le rapport à l’institution catholique s’est modifié significativement, l’entreprise funéraire est graduellement devenue, au cours du XXe siècle, la principale institution susceptible de fournir une alternative au rituel funéraire catholique. Dès les années 1980, en plus du cimetière, du crématorium et de la salle de réception, certaines entreprises funéraires ajoutent à leurs installations la « chapelle » multiconfessionnelle. L’avènement de cette salle polyvalente, qui se transforme au gré des volontés des familles endeuillées, peut être perçu comme le point pivot de la rupture entre l’entreprise funéraire et l’Église catholique, faisant du thanatologue la figure d’autorité en matière de « gestion » de la mort. Outre l’émergence de ces espaces funéraires, il est possible d’observer l’apparition de nouveaux rituels insérés dans une logique visant à combler le « vide » rituel, relativement au recul de l’institution catholique, mais aussi à l’avènement de nouvelles méthodes de transformations des corps et de disposition des restes. Quelles sont aujourd’hui les modalités d’orchestration de la mort dans la société québécoise de tradition catholique? Cette communication cherche à répondre en partie à cette interrogation en proposant une analyse de discours ayant pour objet « l’offre » de rituels funéraires de certaines entreprises funéraires du Québec contemporain. Il s’agira ainsi de tenter de mettre au jour les enjeux et questionnements découlant d’un discours de personnalisation et d’individualisation des rites funéraires.
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Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Lucía Copelotti
Field #3.
Field #4. Catholic University of Uruguay
Field #5.
Field #6. Afro-Brazilian religions and the environmental issue: religious practices in natural areas and cosmological disputes
Field #7. This paper intends to discuss on the emergence, in the Afro-Brazilian religious field, of ecologically oriented discourses and practices that engender certain positions about nature and the environment. This research has focused empirically on the controversies generated by the execution of Afro-Brazilian religious practices in protected natural areas, more accurately in some sectors of the Parque Estadual dos Três Picos (PETP) - an Integral Protection Conservation Area, located in the city of Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From an ethnographic study, the proposal reflects on the different meanings attributed to nature by the multiple actors - religious, environmental, public managers - involved in the discussions regarding the administration and regulation of ritual practices in protected natural areas, perceiving how the diversity of conceptions about nature is central to the development of controversies. In one hand, there is the interest investigating the different conceptions of nature in the conflicts emerged by the ritual practices in protected natural areas. On the other hand, as the discourse of the religious leaders that explain the ecological character associated with their ritual practices intensifies and reaffirms the ontological relationship of Afro-Brazilian cults and nature as a fundamental aspect of the religious worldview, the proposal is to understand how the environmental issue becomes an important focus of interests and claims by these religions.
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Field #1. Religion and Bioethics
Field #2. Cory Steele
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Ottawa
Field #5.
Field #6. An End to Intolerable Suffering: Physician-Assisted Dying and Canadian Law
Field #7. In 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada decriminalized physician-assisted dying in its Carter decision. The Court ruled that the prohibitions against physician-assisted dying as outlined in the Criminal Code were unconstitutional as they violated one’s constitutionally protected right to life, liberty, and security of the person. Subsequently, access to physician-assisted dying as medical care was legalized when Bill C-14 was enacted into law on June 17, 2016. While the jurisprudence of the Carter decision and the amendments made to the Criminal Code by Bill C-14 are interesting, what is of particular importance are the ethical issues introduced by the decriminalization of physician-assisted dying. Such issues include concerns regarding whether doctors, who oppose physician-assisted dying on religious grounds, should be required by law to assist in one’s death as well as whether publicly funded religious health care institutions, that may also object to physician-assisted dying for religious reasons, can deny a person access to a medically assisted death. Drawing on the discourse analysis of the Court’s Carter decision, this paper examines the ethical issues related to physician-assisted dying and how religion and its other, “nonreligion”, are conceptualized concerning this now legal form of medical care. More specifically, this paper explores how the concepts of “death” and “suffering” are framed in both a religious and nonreligious framework to draw attention to broader notions of what religion and nonreligion entail as related to the ethical issues of physician-assisted dying in the context of Canadian law.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Laurel Zwissler
Field #3.
Field #4. Central Michigan University
Field #5.
Field #6. Is Satan a Feminist? Gender, Power, and The Satanic Temple
Field #7. The Satanic Temple is the latest iteration of esoteric Satanism as a new religious movement, positioning itself as more politically activist than other popularized forms (eg. LaVey’s Church of Satan) and as explicitly feminist. TST has been notable for its divergence from historical tradition in the prominent roles taken up by women, most visibly Jex Blackmore as official spokesperson for the organization, rather than as simply sacred consorts of male leaders. However, recent disagreements within the organization have led not only to Blackmore’s disaffiliation with the Temple, but also to an exodus of other “chapters” across the US and Europe. Conflicts revolve around what dissenting members see as a resurgence of androcentric, heterosexist, and elitist values within an organization created to stand with the marginalized. In addition to its well-covered role of inserting a large Baphomet statue into debates over public displays of Ten Commandments monuments, TST has purposefully intervened in heavily contested church/state issues relating to sexuality, such as accessibility of abortion and other forms of birth control, and religiously sanctioned discrimination against LGBTQ individuals. For example, the Detroit chapter, formerly headed by Blackmore, performed same-sex marriages before they were recognized by the state; same-gender kissing has been prominently included in protest performances. This paper explores both TST’s sanctifying of women and LGBTQ people within the broader context of conflicts over sexuality and religion and the internal debates now taking place around leadership, providing important insights into the on-going entanglements of feminism, religion, and power in contemporary North America.
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Antonio Genivaldo Cordeiro de Oliveira
Field #3.
Field #4. PUC-SP
Field #5.
Field #6. The appropriation of Just War Catholic thought by the Greater Japanese Empire.
Field #7. The public role of religion can be also analyzed on its implication with foreign policies. From the first decades of the 20th century, Japan launched its expansionist project with the Greater Japanese Empire. In the intent to accomplish that, Japanese authorities had to rethink their understanding of religion as part of the modern Japanese State. In the 1930s, the Asiatic political context was marked on one side by communism growing from Russia and Japanese imperialism expansionism on the other side. Soon, Japan has become one of the main targets of the front against fascism and anti-imperialist front approved by the International Communist Congress, which impelled Japan to sign the Anti-Comintern Pact. Beyond that political alignment with Western countries, there was also drawn an ideological alignment with the Vatican motivated by the same fight against communism. In that atmosphere, from August 1937, all the Catholic missions in the Far East under Japanese domination were asked to cooperate with Japanese action in China to avoid the danger of communist infiltration. Japanese Officials had soon realized that aside of the collaboration in the occupied territories, the Catholic Church would be also useful in the propaganda in favor of Japanese occupation. This resulted in the dispatch of “Japanese catholic missions” to several countries in the following years. This case can help to think about the possible interactions between studies of religion and international relations.
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Field #1. Gender and Religion: Correlates and Causes
Field #2. Fatima Koura
Field #3.
Field #4. Hudson County Community College
Field #5.
Field #6. Navigating Islam: The Hijab and the American Workplace
Field #7. The United States Constitution allows individuals to practice any religion they choose. However, the austerity of this right is tested when an individual's belief is publicly displayed. For Muslim women wearing the hijab, or headscarf, the intersection between private religious practice and its social expression is explored on a daily basis. To fully understand the manifestation of public religious expression, this paper examines a series of interviews with 35 hijab-wearing Muslim women living in the United States. By exploring the lived experiences of Muslim-American women, this paper highlights the broader issues of the media's influence on perceptions of Muslim culture, the complex and often unclear legality of religious symbols in the workplace, and the barriers that exist for hijab-wearing women in the workplace. With the rise of Islamophobia, the participants found a stronger sense to exert their right to express their religious identities. Moreover, the women interviewed demonstrate their agency by continuing to embrace their religious practice despite intersecting forms of discrimination.
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Field #1. To leave or to stay. Transition to adulthood and religious belonging
Field #2. Franco Garelli
Field #3. Roberta Ricucci
Field #4. University of Turin
Field #5.
Field #6. Walking away from religion. Young atheists in the limelight
Field #7. In the international scientific debate various research agrees that it is easier to transmit ‘unbelief’ or ‘weak belief’ from one generation to the next than it is more-involved religious orientation. In other words, children are more inclined to align themselves with atheistic or agnostic parents whereas most children whose parents are involved in a religious faith tend to distance themselves from this orientation. However, this does not contradict the fact that the most convinced and active religious come from committed families of believers and have had significant religious experience. How does Italy fit into this scenario? The paper presents the findings of quantitative research (1,400 cases) carried out in Italy in 2016 among a representative sample of young people (18-29-year-old), to which has been a qualitative investigation (144 interviews). The result is a complex framework of interweaving motivations. Young people who define themselves ‘no God’ or ‘no religion’ have for the most part undergone religious socialization in the years of infancy and adolescence (catechism, attending parish social centers and local religious communities, periods of spiritual reflection). Thus we are talking about atheists, agnostics and those indifferent to religion who have not been so ‘from the cradle’ but because at a certain point they walked away for various reasons: unclear experiences, the discovery of other vision of reality, reaction against a scandal-ridden church or the inability of churches themselves to update their pastoral offer. And what about those who have had a ‘weak’ religious socialization? The paper will describe and discuss the topic combining both the quantitative and qualitative data.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Rafael Cazarin
Field #3.
Field #4. ISOR - Autonomous University of Barcelona
Field #5.
Field #6. Emotional narratives of political engagement in gender transformative interventions with religious leaders
Field #7. This paper examines gender transformative interventions with religious leaders carried out by a South African NGO working in southern Africa. My aim is to explore the ways religious and secular notions around gender-based violence are negotiated within an emotional and social-cognitive framework. Furthermore, I am interested on the ways they place or arrange particular emotions associated to gender roles when discussing contexts of violence. To perform this task, I analyze at the interplay of gendered emotional dispositions as they are framed by participants of ‘transformative interventions’. I look at these interventions as processes of social learning in which emotions are the common ground for the negotiation of religious and secular arguments in the notion of gender equality. In this way, participants’ consistent allusions to emotions (fear, shame, frustration, anger) in contexts of gender-based violence seem to foster the re-gendering of emotions. This ‘new’ emotional dispositions were narrated by religious leaders in interviews, group discussions and interactions with NGO facilitators. To conclude, I argue that this re-gendering of emotions seems to shift the gender transformative focus of the interventions from the public to the private sphere. In other words, participants rework emotional repertoires that sustain the notion of gender equality in personal relationships while enacting conservative masculine identities in public.
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Field #1. Religious Minorities: Muslims in the West and Minorities in the Islamic Societies
Field #2. Borja Wladimiro Gonzalez Fernandez
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Field #5.
Field #6. War and peace at the crossroads between Islam and Christianity. The Maronites in 20th-century Lebanon
Field #7. The social and legal position of the non-Muslim communities living in Muslim-majority countries remains a contentious issue in both academic and public parlance. The weight of Qur’anic prescriptions and doctrinal opinion, together with present-day attempts at resurrecting long-forgotten practices, has contributed to conceal the diversity of statuses and the plurality of informal practices that defined the situation of these communities in the wider Dar al-Islam area. In this context, the Lebanese Maronite community deserves a special analysis, insofar as it managed to escape most of the restrictions classically weighing on other Christian communities in the Levant, while also achieving the construction of a national consciousness at the crossroads between Islam and Christianity, between East and West. This presentation, in studying the role played by the community’s religious and secular leaders during the 20th century, will try to shed light on how the non-formalized, inter-sectarian power-sharing traditions historically constructed by Maronites and Druzes, came to reshape, limit and condition the practices of the different actors on the political arena, far beyond the influence ever achieved by formal Laws, whether State-imposed or religious. It will be, moreover, argued that the recovery of these para-legal and pluri-centric traditions in the aftermath of Lebanon’s protracted civil war (1975-1990) reveals not only their resilience, but also their adaptability and offers a viable example for the consolidation of inter-sectarian peace across the demographic patchwork of the Middle East.
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Field #1. Politics, Religion and Gender in Central and Eastern Europe (joint ISSR-ISORECEA session)
Field #2. Katarzyna Zielkińska
Field #3. Anna Szwed
Field #4. Institute of Sociology, Jagiellonian University
Field #5.
Field #6. Women against the Catholic Church? Secular claims in women’s mobilisations (Black Protests) in Poland
Field #7. The strong, or even hegemonic position of the Roman Catholic Church in Polish society is a well-researched topic that is often taken for granted. In giving explanations, scholars usually stress the tight links between national identity and Roman Catholicism which result from Poland's troublesome history, which has in turn allowed the Roman Catholic Church to gain a privileged position both symbolically and politically. However, what seems to be missing is a general question and then related research on the constructions of counter-hegemony and resistance to this domination. Our research attempts to fill this gap. The term “Black Protests” is a concept used to describe the mass protests, which happened between 2016 and 2018, against the attempts to ban or limit access to legal abortion in Poland. The first protest (October 2016 – Women's Strike) focused mostly on the issue of abortion and reproductive rights. In the following protests (in 2017 and 2018) the scope of contestation widened to include women’s rights more generally as well as the need to redefine the concept of citizenship. The secularist claims demanding the redefinition of the Roman Catholic public role became a central element of this contestation. The aim of our paper is to look at how the participants of the protests question the domination of the Roman Catholic Church, how they articulate the public place of religion and which discursive strategies they use to construct alternative vision (counter-hegemony). Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe's discourse theory serves as a theoretical basis for our research. We will use speeches made during the protests, artefacts (e.g. posters) as well as discussions in social media as empirical material.
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Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Andrea Tomita
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidade de São Paulo
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious narratives in transit: the case of Sekai Meshiya Kyo in Japan, USA and Brazil
Field #7. Narratives are fundamental so that the human being can give meaning to the world. In the context of religious faith, they relate to the way each religion elaborates its memories and builds its own identity. From the twentieth century, along with the flow of migrants from Japan to abroad, new japanese religions (NJR) are transplanted to places like Hawaii and Los Angeles in the US and several cities in Brazil. Sekai Meshiya Kyo (SMK) was founded by Meishu-Sama (whose civil name is Mokichi Okada) in 1950. It is a NJR that aims at the salvation of humanity based on the discourse of creating a world free of disease, poverty and conflict. In its early days, when religious freedom did not exist in interwar Japan, its narratives focused on faith in Kanzeon Bosatsu – popularly known as the goddess Kannon. In the post-war period, SMK's narratives have undergone a series of transformations in their native country and after their transplantation in different places of the Americas. In this communication, we intend to identify the characteristics of narratives developed by women in pioneering missions of the messianic religion in the second half of the twentieth century. Through this initial survey, not only ideas, feelings and religious practices will be verified, but also how the narratives are received and recreated (or not) in different societies, as is the case of the messianic community in the USA and Brazil. Keywords: Narrative; new Japanese religion; Kannon; Messiah; women.
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Maria Falina
Field #3.
Field #4. Dublin City University
Field #5.
Field #6. Secular Liberalism and Religious Diversity in Interwar Yugoslavia
Field #7. The paper looks at how religious diversity was dealt with in interwar Yugoslavia and argues that despite the acceptance of religious equality alongside national self-determination as foundational principles of the new state and new liberal political order, not all religious groups in Yugoslavia were treated equally. In the context of the European ‘Wilsonian moment’, the emphasis fell not only on national self-determination, but also on democratic rights and freedoms, and religious equality and freedom of belief were naturally considered to be essential. Yet, Yugoslav Muslims were largely absent from the picture as political actors of any significance (especially in the early years), and the benefits of religious equality applied to them somewhat less than to their Christian fellow citizens. The overwhelmingly Christian character of the new nation-state was taken for granted. The situation was further complicated by the predominant attitude that the most liberal (read desired) option for Yugoslavia was seen as an a-confessional, completely secular state with strict separation of church and state. The wish for a secular, yet culturally Christian state led to a number of mistakes in managing religious communities (Christian and Muslim alike) and to their eventual disappointment in the Yugoslav idea. The paper traces how this process developed in the period from 1917 to 1941 and suggests that in order for religious dimension of interwar Yugoslav history to be properly understood and appreciated, one needs to problematize the overwhelmingly secular bias of contemporary academia and history writing.
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Field #1. Towards an empirical analysis of interreligious dialogue
Field #2. Alberto Montes
Field #3.
Field #4. AFES Salud Mental Murcia y Comarcas
Field #5.
Field #6. Initiatives of interreligious dialogue in Cantabria (Spain)
Field #7. In a recent investigation on Religious Minorities in Cantabria (Spain), the existence of diverse initiatives tending to promote interreligious dialogue has been detected. They are the following: the Week of Prayer for the Unity of Christians, the Protestant Cemetery of Santander, the legislation on public attention to diversity in the Autonomous Community of Cantabria and the Intercultural Social Project "Lacampa". Each of these initiatives has its own characteristics in terms of the origin and the reasons that have driven them, their own actors, their target population and their structure.And they also have different effects on the population. The indicated initiatives may explain the low interreligious conflict in the Autonomous Community of Cantabria. In this Communication, each of these initiatives is briefly described and proposals for the future on interreligious dialogue are made.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Lived Religion and Museums
Field #2. Ekaterina Teryukova
Field #3.
Field #4. The State Museum of the History of Religion, Saint-Petersburg State Universiry
Field #5.
Field #6. Museum Collections as a Research Source for Study of Religion: from the History of the State Museum of the History of Religion (Saint-Petersburg, Russia)
Field #7. The presentation examines the museum collections as a research source for study of religion by means of an example of the history of collecting in the State Museum of the History of Religion. The Museum is the only Russian and one of the few world museums whose permanent and temporary exhibitions show religion as a universal cultural phenomenon with a long and intricate past, actively developing. Over a period of 85 years the Museum collection included diverse items (books, manuscripts, archeological and ethnographical objects, pieces of art, textiles, devotional articles, graphics, handwritten and photo documents). But at the same time the Museum is a unique Russian Religious Studies centers where the study of religion is based on the materials of collections. Special significance to the Museum collection as a research source gives the fact that many of them were collected by great Russian scholars who studied material religion. The presentation explores the history of formation of few of them in the past and the results of their studying in nowadays.
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Field #1. Liberation Christianity in Latin America. Politics, Religion and Spirituality in the Global South
Field #2. William Elvis Plata Quezada
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidad Industrial de Santander
Field #5.
Field #6. LES ÉGLISES CHRÉTIENS ET LE CONFLIT ARMÉ CONTEMPORAINE EN COLOMBIE : ACCUEILLE ET RÉSISTANCE
Field #7. Le conflit armé qui a vécu la Colombie dans les temps récents a reçu des différentes stratégies de résistance pacifique. Beaucoup de ces stratégies ont été dirigées ou soutenues par l'Église Catholique, mais aussi, par quelques églises pentecôtistes, notamment dans des régions lointaines aux centres urbains. Parmi les processus les plus intéressantes sont ceux des diocèses catholiques du Barrancabermeja et Socrorro-San Gil et aussi de l’Eglise Evangélique Quadrangulaire d’El Garzal. Tous les trois dans une région « Frontière » du pays, le Magdalena Medio (centre-nord) caractérisée pour la débilité de l'état, la richesse naturelle et la présence active de groupes armées. Cet article expose la caractérisation générale de la résistance gérée pour ces organisations ecclésiales, notamment à partir de fins des années 1980. Ces actions ont été caractérisées pour la défense des droits de l’homme, l'accueille de population affectée pour le conflit, la défense du droit à la terre, et pour la résistance pacifique aux actions des groupes armées involucrées (particulièrement les paramilitaires y et l'armée) contre la population civile. On fera une comparaison entre les trois processus, lesquelles accordent un grand poids aux leaderships religieux (prêtres et pasteurs), mais qu’ont été inspirées et soutenus de façon différente : les premiers dans la théologie de la libération, et le deuxième dans l’expérience pentecôtiste et appuyée dans le message biblique (une « théologie de la libération » spontanée} ?). La confluence des façons différentes de voir et vivre la foi dans des processus d'organisation sociopolitique est expliquée pour le particulier et difficile contexte qui menace la vie et la survivance de la population. Mais aussi l'article propose l'hypothèse que les actions s'inscrivent dans une large tradition qui donne aux églises (telles que communautés et telles qu'institutions) une fonction d’« asile », et de « refuge » sacralisée contre les pouvoirs qui menacent les vies des persécutés.
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Field #1. Criminalization of religion in contexts of authoritarian democracies: a compared perspective from Latin America and the Middle-East
Field #2. Ricardo Peñafiel
Field #3.
Field #4. Université du Québec à Montréal / GRIPAL
Field #5.
Field #6. Théologie politique, Violence divine et criminalisation des défenseur-e-s des droits en Amérique latine
Field #7. La notion de Théologie politique fait référence au transfert de concepts théologiques (comme la toute-puissance de Dieu) sur le souverain sécularisé. Apportant ordre, sécurité et prospérité, cette toute-puissance « providentielle » est censée détenir le monopole de la violence légitime. Aussi, lorsque se produisent des actions transgressives d’envergure (qu’elles soient religieuses ou non), l’État voit son monopole ou sa toute-puissance remise en question et s’abat contre les activistes ou le manifestant-e-s comme s’il s’agissait d’ennemis intérieurs, en les criminalisant et en les mettant au ban de la société. La violence de la répression et de la persécution ne s’explique pas en fonction de la violence des actions (pacifiques pour l’immense majorité) mais du dommage symbolique infligé à la toute-puissance de l’État au moment où la société se montre capable de se donner ses propres règles. Walter Benjamin appelle « violence pure » ou « divine » cette capacité de certaines actions à briser le cercle mythique de la violence d’État (au sein duquel la violence fondatrice du droit porte en elle les traces d’une violence conservatrice du droit dans la figure de l’état d’exception suspendant le droit pour le préserver. Analysés dans cette perspective théologico-politique, la criminalisation des défenseur-e-s des droits en Amérique latine (et en particulier ses formes religieuses ou ethniques) est à la mesure de leur portée critique et émancipatrice. Cherchant moins à fonder un nouveau droit (i.e. un nouvel État), ces actions tendent à préserver la possibilité de tous les droits parce qu’en dehors du droit.
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Emilie Drapeau
Field #3.
Field #4. Université d'Ottawa
Field #5.
Field #6. Catholique, croyant et pratiquant : Représentations et figures stéréotypées
Field #7. Cette communication s’appuie sur des données collectées dans le cadre de la recherche « Vers une sortie de la religion culturelle des Québécois, Enquête quantitative et qualitative au Québec et au Canada » dirigée par E.-Martin Meunier. En continuité avec l’invitation à questionner la signification de se dire catholique et, de là, avec l’identification d’un modèle idéalisé où la variance de comportement peut correspondre à une auto-exclusion du monde religieux (Meunier, à paraître), elle appelle à mieux comprendre ce que signifie appartenir, croire et pratiquer pour des jeunes, 18-35 ans, se déclarant catholiques et vivant au Québec. Dans un contexte de défis posés pour l’objectivation sociologique du phénomène religieux (Willaime, 2012), les apports des méthodes qualitatives (Tanaka, 2010) et de l’analyse de contenu de représentations sociales (Negura, 2006) sont explorés. Les résultats reposent sur : 1) des types d’auto-identification liés à l’appartenance, à la croyance religieuse et à la pratique religieuse; 2) des énoncés de croyance et des pratiques déclarées et 3) des contenus de représentation condensés en figures stéréotypées. Les manières de se dire, ou non, appartenir, croire et pratiquer sont éclairées sous l’angle d’une prise de distance vis-à-vis des figures stéréotypées du catholique, du croyant et du pratiquant et vis-à-vis des croyances et des pratiques religieuses leur étant associées. La communication contribuera aux réflexions sur l’élaboration d’outils permettant de mieux comprendre la religion du point de vue des individus (McGuire, 2008) et de leur rapport au catholicisme.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Ullrich Kleinhempel
Field #3.
Field #4. Bayernkolleg, Schweinfurt
Field #5.
Field #6. Intercultural encounters and dynamics of culture and spirituality: Bantu mediumism and the revision of epistemic assumptions in South African psychiatry
Field #7. South Africa has a well-developed Bantu culture of mediumism, of “Sangomas”, which is embedded in societal institutions for the training of gifted mediums in a rigorous and structured process. It has become established in modern urban and academic SA. See: L.R.N. Mlisa (psychologist and research fellow at Univ. of Ft. Hare, SA), Ukuthwasa Initiation of Amagcirha: Identity Construction and the Training of Xhosa Women as Traditional Healers. Bloemfontein, 2009 (Diss.), http://scholar.ufs.ac.za:8080/xmlui/bitstream/handle/11660/2171/MlisaL-RN.pdf?sequence=1. Her own training as Igqirha is included. European reception of Bantu mediumism by psychiatrists in SA began decades ago. See B.F.J. Laubscher, The Pagan Soul, London, 1975. http://downloads.astro-theology.za.org/tps.pdf. In SA psychiatry growing acceptance of Bantu mediumism and its phenomena, and their distinction from psychiatric disorders exists. See G.C. Oosthuizen et al. (eds.), Afro-Christian religion and healing in southern Africa, Lewiston, 1989 and subsequent literature on transcultural psychiatry. Pragmatic acceptance of Bantu mediumism is growing in international medical institutions. They are reflected in literature and interact with European Esotericism. Sympathetic reports in respected European media, like FAZ, STERN or BBC attest to this trans-cultural reception. which resonates with Western Esotericism (see: ESSWE), traditions of mediumism and notions of "extended naturalism" gaining scholarly acceptance. This reflect changing attitudes in the fields of general culture and of psychiatry, psychotherapy and religion as long-term effects of intercontinental migrations and intercultural encounters. Cf. U.R. Kleinhempel, “Covert Syncretism: The reception of South Africa’s Sangoma practise and spirituality by “double faith” in the contexts of Christianity and of Esotericism”, Open Theology, 3.1 (2017): De Gruyter, https://doi.org/10.1515/opth-2017-0050
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion towards Migration
Field #2. Marcin Lisak
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute for Catholic Church Statistics, Warsaw
Field #5.
Field #6. Religiosity of Polish Immigrants Living in the Republic of Ireland: Migrants’ Religion vis-à-vis the Processes of Secularization and (Dis)Integration
Field #7. This quantitative research examines the transformation in religiosity of Polish immigrants living in the Republic of Ireland. The study undertakes an analysis of the first generation migrants, predominantly Catholic, in terms of the changing religiosity, importance of religiosity to intra-EU migrants and shifting migratory strategies during they stay in a secularized post-Catholic host society of Ireland. Empirical results are based on respondent-driven sampling (RDS) that allows to survey across hard-to-reach Polish immigrants. RDS sample of 510 respondents retains the data equal to a random sample of Polish subpopulation (over 122 thousand) [Census 2016] which is the largest group of immigrants living in the Republic of Ireland (total population 4,761 thousand). This quantitative method is triangulated with qualitative ones: focus group interviews and in-depth interviews. The outcomes support the hypothesis of secularization accordingly to its modified form that based on the safety axiom (economic welfare) and the cultural traditions axiom [Norris, Inglehart 2004]. Furthermore, the study facilitates a debate over a social role of parallel religion (denominations) that is both integrative and disintegrative [Yinger 1970]. At this point, the collected data allow to analyze social cohesion range as religiously conditioned. The analysis lead to the settlement of a case: either religion of Polish immigrants is related to the establishment of networks, mutual integration and building bridges that bind migrants and the receiving society [Garcia-Munoz, Neuman 2014], or religion serves as a ‘balm for the soul’, buffers against the distress of migration and protects against cultural assimilation [Warner 1997; Massey, Espinoza Higgins 2010].
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Lauren Strumos
Field #3.
Field #4. The Univeristy of Ottawa
Field #5.
Field #6. A Vegan Ecology: Drawing Connections Among Religion, Spirituality, Veganism, and the Deep Ecology Movement
Field #7. In his examination of the deep ecology movement, Arne Naess (1984) found that supporters of deep ecology commonly favor a vegetarian diet. As this observation demonstrates, the ecophilosophy of deep ecology becomes manifest in practice through one’s lifestyle, including diet. This paper emerges from Naess’ observation to examine the connections among religion, spirituality, and veganism in relation to deep ecology. For this paper, veganism is broadly defined as a lifestyle that avoids the consumption of nonhuman animals and their by-products, which is rooted in a philosophy that holds nonhuman animals should not be subjugated by human animals. A vegan’s own understanding of veganism and reasons for becoming vegan are diverse and complex, though, and recent scholarship has begun to capture these perspectives among individual vegans. Some findings demonstrate that veganism can be an expression of one’s religious or spiritual identity, while others suggest that veganism may be a religion or spirituality itself. This paper will compare these perspectives to the principles of the deep ecology movement, as explicated by Arne Naess, George Sessions, and Bill Devall. It will propose that in some of its manifestations, veganism represents a contemporary religious and spiritual contributor to the deep ecology movement.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Wei-hsian Chi
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica
Field #5.
Field #6. Materiality of Religion: Affect, Taste and Body in Taiwanese Popular Religion
Field #7. Religion is used to be viewed as the social field concerning people’s beliefs and world view, which are believed to co-evolve with their social life. The foreign term “religion” has been framing the way, how Taiwanese people should revalue their own “religious” life since the post-colonial period. Religious and related cultural discourses led by social elites and government constantly impose pressures on the popular religion. In spite of the regulating power of social-political discourses, Taiwanese popular religion benefits from the materiality of its various ritual practices and find its drive to flourish in one other way. Based on the ritualistic materiality, the participants’ bodily experiences, aroused affects and forming tastes maintain their links with the popular religion. Even though the ritual practicing people do not necessarily identify themselves as “believer,” they are on the way to developing their own belief. People of this transient status build up new communities in various forms, including those based on new media, and are creating a new landscape in the popular religion. This paper shows how the religious taste and affected body drive the reformation of popular religion in Taiwan.
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Field #1. The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe
Field #2. Paul Freston
Field #3. Paul Freston
Field #4. Wilfrid Laurier University
Field #5.
Field #6. The Growth of Christian Zionism in the Global South
Field #7. There is increasing interest in global southern evangelical Christianity in Christian Zionism (CZ), i.e. geopolitical activism by Christians in favour of the state of Israel, not just its right to exist but also to expand. This is related to Philo-Semitic attitudes within evangelicalism but goes beyond, to a definite political position, including attempts to influence the foreign policy of one’s own nation-state. Most global southern countries have not been favourable to Israel, so the strengthening of CZ can bring marked shifts in policy. This strengthening is partly through endogenous factors, but also through efforts by external actors, both Western CZ organizations and the Israeli government. While parts of sub-Saharan Africa seem to offer the greatest opportunities for CZs to influence their foreign policies, considerable influence has also been achieved in parts of Latin America, symbolized by Guatemala’s imitating of Trump’s embassy move to Jerusalem, and the new Brazilian government’s desire to do the same. What changes does CZ undergo in this shift southwards? And will the multifarious resistances it faces in global southern contexts mean Israeli hopes of a key geopolitical change will be dashed? There has been little academic study of this potentially far-reaching transformation. But the importance of such a study could hardly be greater; the conflict has large geopolitical implications, is one of the chief factors in global instability, and represents an on-going unresolved dilemma of the Christian tradition.
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Field #1. The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe
Field #2. Kathleen Openshaw
Field #3.
Field #4. Western Sydney University
Field #5.
Field #6. The Temple of Solomon in Brazil: Using materiality to manifest Israel’s spiritual power in The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God
Field #7. The Temple of Solomon in São Paulo, Brazil is the new international headquarters of Brazilian neo-Pentecostal megachurch The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (UCKG). It is an ambitious replica of the biblical temple built by King Solomon. The Temple was constructed with materials imported from Israel, and heavily adopts elements of Jewish material culture and Old Testament narratives. In the Universal Church, Judaism and Israel command spiritual authority. Drawing on two years of ethnographic research in the UCKG’s Australian headquarters, during which time I joined congregants on pilgrimage to the Temple, I argue that by appropriating the spiritual power of Jewish and Israeli materiality, the UCKG has created a new epicentre of extraordinary spiritual power for its congregants in an industrial district of a megacity. The Temple provides access to the Holy Land for the UCKG’s mostly poor Brazilian congregants, many of whom could never afford to travel to Israel. It has also become a place of pilgrimage for its global congregants. This paper contributes to scholarly discussions of the importance of materiality in creating sacred places, and Christian Philo-Semitism in the Global South.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Frank Usarski
Field #3.
Field #4. Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo
Field #5.
Field #6. The systematic structure of the research of religion and the process of migration – synthesis and exemplification
Field #7. The quantitative leap of research on religion and migration in the last years represents for Sociology of Religion a second academic challenge. Besides the continuing collection of empirical data of the field in question and its analysis, there is the demand of contextualizing the singular researches within frame of reference, which reflects the heuristic systematic of the field in its totality. This paper introduces such a frame of reference in form of a model composed of three analytical axes constitutive for the study of the relation between religion and migration. The final part draws on the already existing literature on related issues and exemplifies the utility of the frame of reference.
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Field #1. Religion and the Contemporary Right
Field #2. Juan Vives
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidad Adventista del Plata (Argentina)
Field #5.
Field #6. From Perón to Bolsonaro: populism, religion, and church-state relations in South America
Field #7. The overwhelming support that many religious sectors of the population, particularly evangelicals, offered to President Bolsonaro during the last electoral campaign in Brazil, drew attention to the relationship between populist leaders and religion. That connection had already gained relevance during the election of President Trump in the United States. The parallels were pointed out immediately. However, that relationship was not new in South America. Populism is a problematic concept, far from being univocal. However, Juan Perón’s government, arguably the first populist government in the world, already shown some of the characteristics that are now observed in Bolsonaro's speech. In this paper, the author argues that some of these traits, implicit in populism, influenced the relationship of populist governments with religion, and therefore in church-state relations. The Peronism showed the complexities of the bond between populism and religion. A love/hate relationship characterized the relations between the Peronist government and the religious sectors. In turn, these fluctuations affected the state's relations with religious groups, ranging from a quasi-establishment of the Catholic Church to fierce opposition to Catholicism and an opening towards formerly discriminated religious minorities. Perhaps without showing such oscillation, similar characteristics have been manifested by other populist regimes that ensued Peronism in South America. In the present work, some characteristics of the populism are analyzed, particularly as they have affected, and still does, the church-state relationship in South America.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Treating the Dead in the Aboriginal Worlds at the Age of Religious Pluralism
Field #2. Denis Boivin
Field #3.
Field #4. Université Laval
Field #5.
Field #6. La fête des Morts ressuscitée
Field #7. Tout fervent d’histoire du Canada connaît la Fête des Morts célébrée chez les Hurons-Wendat. Plusieurs témoins historiques la décrivent. En 1616, Samuel de Champlain nous apprend que «la fête des morts » se déroulait à tous les douze ans pendant dix jours. Il appuie même son récit par un dessin. En 1636, le missionnaire Jean de Brébeuf relate également que la fête « se fait environ de douze ans en douze ans, les âmes quittent le cimetière et aux dires de quelques-uns se changent en tourterelles..." et continue : " une seule feste dans chaque nation (...) tous les mêmes corps ... dans la même fosse". L’auteur avoue que ce que font les sauvages le touche plus que ce qui se passe dans les cimetières de la France. Depuis 1958, le Royal Ontario Museum entreposait, pour études, l’ossuaire d’Ossossane, capitale wendat de 1649. Sacrilège pour certains ! En 1999, les Wendat organisèrent un rapatriement de ces ossements. Présidé par Michel Gros-Louis, le rituel du réenterrement eut lieu à la sépulture d'Ossossane, en Ontario. Cet événement coïncida aussi avec le 350e anniversaire de la dispersion des Wendat en 1649. Les Wendat et les Wyandotte, dispersés en Amérique du Nord, du Kansas à l’Oklahoma en passant par Détroit se réunirent, rallumèrent le grand feu et signèrent une entente de collaboration et d’amitié comme par le passé. Un rituel très spécial, un rappel de l’histoire régressive ou progressive où l’on reconnaîtra plus que la « fête des morts » ?
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Field #1. The reciprocal influence of religion and demography
Field #2. Conrad Hackett
Field #3. Marcin Stonawski
Field #4. Pew Research Center
Field #5.
Field #6. Improving the modeling of religious switching in population projections
Field #7. In our 2015 report The Future of World Religions, we developed a method for modeling future religious switching in 70 countries. In this presentation, we will review the strengths and limitations of that effort and discuss our plans to improve these methods in new projections.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Democracy against democracy? Circumventing religious rights by democratic means
Field #2. Elenie Poulos
Field #3.
Field #4. Macquarie University, Australia
Field #5.
Field #6. The Problem of Religious Freedom: An Analysis of Australian Public Inquiries into Religious Freedom
Field #7. Australia is the only western democracy without a comprehensive human rights act or charter and has only limited protection for religious freedom in its constitution. It was Australia’s growing religious diversity—the result of robust political support for multiculturalism and pro-immigration policies in the post-war period—that led to the first public inquiry into religious freedom by an Australian statutory body in 1984. The ensuing report detailed the need for stronger legal protections in the face of discrimination against Indigenous Australians and minority religious groups. By 2018, Australia’s religious freedom ‘problem’ was focussed solely on the extent to which (largely) Christian organisations should be allowed to discriminate against LGBT people in the provision of social services and in religious schools, both of which receive significant government funding. This paper explores the changing representation of the problem of religious freedom by examining all public, parliamentary and statutory body reports of inquiries into religious freedom from 1984-2018. These reports have influenced the perception of the problem of religious freedom, just as they sought to offer solutions. The analysis demonstrates that the discrimination and vilification suffered by Australian Jews, Muslims, Sikhs and others has become invisible in the public debate and progressive religious voices have been marginalised. Conservative Christian politicians, church leaders and lobby groups have used these inquiries to try to maintain and strengthen their institutional privileges in Australian law by redefining the problem of religious freedom.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe
Field #2. Juan Caraballo-Resto
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Puerto Rico
Field #5.
Field #6. Ritualizing Orientalism and Philo-Semitism: The Task of Making God Exist in the Colonial Caribbean
Field #7. The central argument in Edward Said’s ‘Orientalism’ (1978) is that the way we acquire knowledge is not innocent nor objective, but the end result of a highly motivated process that reflects certain interests. He argues that the way the ‘West’ looks at the countries and peoples of the Middle East is through a lens that distorts the actual reality of these places and its people. Orientalism, in this regard, serves as a framework that is used to understand the unfamiliar and the strange in order to make the peoples of the Middle East appear different and threatening. This general process of stereotyping is one that, according to Said, serves as a tool for colonialism. In time, however, this colonial stance has not only impacted the regional territories, but transpired to other—more distant—colonial subjects, who adopt it as a self-redeeming narrative. With this argument in mind, this fieldwork-based paper discusses a growing tendency amongst some Evangelical congregations in Puerto Rico, which ascribe meaning to Middle Eastern geographies through the conflicts and allegiances put forth by, and the Evangelical theologies consumed within, the United States of America. In particular, it focuses on the orientalist and philo-semitic hermeneutics that have jointly flourished in this still colonial island.
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Field #1. Mobility, ritual and public space. Transnational Catholic scenarios in large cities
Field #2. Hector Guazon
Field #3.
Field #4. University of the Philippines
Field #5.
Field #6. The Politics of Filipino Chaplaincy
Field #7. Building on researches that problematize the ways in which Filipinos embrace in varying degrees Roman Catholicism, my study probes how socially differentiated Filipino migrants in Brussels, Belgium intimately explore Roman Catholicism's values as they create the Filipino Chaplaincy within their unstable diasporic context.  Roman Catholic religion, as it is a source of idioms, rituals, and material representations, plays a significant role in the lives of and is produced in many ways by Filipinos, given their varying social position in Brussels, Belgium. As this study shows, among the Roman Catholic principles and concomitant resources that Filipino Catholics appropriate, along with their fellow Filipinos in Brussels, "standing for the marginalized" becomes a potent force for church authorities as well as Filipino religious and civic leader's claim to cooperation, leadership, and dejection.  Even while this is shared by Filipino Catholics in Brussels, this research shows the particularity of Filipino Catholics' appropriation.  Hence, this study probes further the sociopolitical circumstances in Belgium and the inter(and trans)-personal mediations within the Filipino network of relations that make the Filipino Catholics strategic in their want to create the Filipino chaplaincy in Brussels and, correspondingly, yield favorable results in their handling of their diasporic drama. It also explores the various forms of mediations and constraints - residency, gender, ageing, job options and security - that (re)contour the Filipino chaplaincy as enabler of moral subjectivities, made manifest in agents' expanded purpose. In doing so, this research will further stir the longstanding questioning of received essentialist notions of Filipino religiosity and sociomoral values.
Field #8.


Field #1. Media dynamics of nationalism and religion
Field #2. Enqi Weng
Field #3.
Field #4. Deakin University
Field #5.
Field #6. Australia as ‘swamped by Muslims’ and its ‘African gang’ problem: Media continuations and disruptions of empire religion
Field #7. Despite increasing ethnic and religious diversification especially since the dismantling of the White Australian Policy in the 1970s, religious and racial ‘others’, through the Muslim and African communities of late, continue to be politicised through Australian media (Han & Budarick, 2018). It can be argued that the religious beliefs, practices and expressions of ethnic and racial minorities continue to be benchmarked against a dominant Eurocentric framework informed by Australia’s colonial and Judeo-Christian heritage (Randell-Moon, 2006; Stratton, 2016). Australia’s ceaselessly fraught relationship with its Aboriginal people further demonstrates that its national identity remain uncomfortably rooted in its racially and religiously-determined colonial past. This paper argues that the presence of empire religion (Connell, 2016), viewed here as a form of religious expression largely informed by specific Judeo-Christian perspectives, simultaneously dominate and is contested in Australian media. Such religiously-informed ideologies continue to fuel heightened expressions of nationalistic sentiments. Data findings from various Australian research on media’s representation and construction of religions and its communities will be presented in this paper. New theoretical considerations on the hypermediation of religion (Evolvi, 2018; Echachibi 2017) with its emphasis on the accelerated compression of time and space within media spaces, and the emotive effect on discourses about and perceptions of religion will frame this paper’s approach (Abdel-Fadil, forthcoming).
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Field #1. Current Concerns in Parish and Congregational Research
Field #2. Mark Bohr
Field #3. Mark Bohr
Field #4. Alphacrucis College Australia
Field #5.
Field #6. The future of the local congregation in a globalised society
Field #7. The research of the Christian Research Association in Australia, Christian Research (Resonate) in England, the Barna Research in America, amongst others, suggest that after the cultural revolution of the 60s and 70s church attendance has declined in the western world. At the same time, attendances at mega-churches (over 2,000 in attendance each week) has increased markedly. Researchers suggest that this phenomenon has brought about a movement within the Christian churches in which attenders have transitioned away from local congregations and moved towards more multi-functional churches that cater for all their family’s needs. It may also reflect an increased sense of consumerism in attitudes to church attendance. These factors have placed the local congregation and local forms of faith formation in jeopardy as those previously committed to the local church and their local community have increasingly moved towards big churches. This paper explores the movement into mega-churches, based on both interviews and surveys of Gen Y in Australia. It will compare the findings with similar research conducted by the Fuller Youth Institute. The paper will seek to identify some of the implications for the formation of faith communities among young adults from a practitioner’s perspective.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Social Movements, Rebellions and Revolutions through Religious Contention
Field #2. Mehrnosh Lajevardi Fatemi
Field #3. Rob Stones
Field #4. Western Sydney University
Field #5.
Field #6. The politics of religion (case study, Iran)
Field #7. The upheaval created by the Islamic Revolution in Iran (1979) saw a surge of religious power break the pre-existing boundary between religion and politics. This was a boundary between two realms that had remained really quite distinct until the arrival of the Grand Ayatollah Khomeini (the highest level Shia authority) - ending 2,500 years of Persian monarchy. Part of the Ayatollah’s appeal to the vast majority of Iranians, was his highly-publicized slogan that ‘Islam and politics cannot be separated’ (Khomeini, 1981: 338-339): political structure must be subservient to Islam and the two intertwined to ensure that public life is consistent with spiritual life. In the early stages of this new regime, faith-based political actors, both intentionally and unintentionally, developed religious propaganda which took on political meaning, infiltrating its way into every aspect of ordinary life in Iran. As the people responded well, more deliberate action was taken by those who held a monopoly of religious and political power, with an ensuing spiral effect that reached beyond national borders. This coincided with ‘postmodern’ global capitalism and ‘post secularism’, which provoked an Islamic backlash, and provided fertile ground for it. Drawing on structuration’s concept of the ‘duality of structure and agency’, which directs attention to the ‘internal’ ways of seeing of the actors who are directly involved, the paper emphasises the process of structuration in situ. It does this by paying attention to how key actors interpreted, and responded to, the changing structures of power within the faith-based political realm.
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Field #1. Field perspective and reverse angle: Politics of fieldwork in religious contexts
Field #2. Juliette Galonnier
Field #3.
Field #4. INED
Field #5.
Field #6. Ce que les financements de la recherche font aux enquêtes sur l’islam
Field #7. Dans le cadre de cette session consacrée aux politiques de l’enquête en terrain religieux, on propose d’étudier, à travers un exemple précis, les effets de la contractualisation de la recherche, et des financements par appels à projets en particulier, sur les conditions de réalisation d’enquêtes en sciences sociales sur l’islam et les musulmans en France. Depuis 2015, le Bureau central des cultes (BCC) du Ministère de l’Intérieur a ouvert, en partenariat avec le Ministère de l’Éducation nationale, de l’Enseignement supérieur et de la Recherche, une ligne de crédits de recherche, les appels « Islam, religion, société », ayant pour finalité de répondre aux besoins de connaissance des pouvoirs publics sur l’islam contemporain. Pour l’année 2017, les thèmes des appels proposés par le BCC (en accord avec le Conseil d’administration et le Conseil scientifique) étaient les suivants : n° 16 – L’islam au quotidien n° 17a et 17b – L’islam à Mayotte et à La Réunion n° 18 – Engagements féminins dans l’islam de France n° 19 – Les salons musulmans en France et en Belgique n° 20 – Le soufisme en France n° 21 – L’islam subsaharien et comorien en France métropolitaine n° 22 – L’humanitaire islamique en France Ayant postulé avec un collègue à l’appel n°21 et ayant travaillé pendant une année sur les musulmans d’origine subsaharienne et comorienne dans le paysage islamique français (une cinquantaine d’entretiens réalisés, un colloque organisé les 10-11 décembre 2018 réunissant des chercheurs et des acteurs du culte), je propose dans cette communication d’opérer un retour réflexif sur les opportunités et les défis que pose la conduite de la recherche sur commande des pouvoirs publics. Il s’agira en particulier de s’interroger sur les points de rencontre et de divergence entre les attentes du BCC et les intérêts des chercheurs. Il s’agira aussi de revenir sur la façon dont les enquêtés eux-mêmes se saisissent de la recherche menée et des évènements organisés pour interpeller directement les pouvoirs publics sur les enjeux liés à l’islam en/de France. Dans un tel contexte, les chercheurs sont parfois amenés à jouer un rôle de pivot qui, s’il peut être inconfortable, ouvre aussi de formidables possibilités d’enquête et d’observation.
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Mikko Lagerspetz
Field #3. Sabina Hadzibulic
Field #4. Åbo Akademi University
Field #5.
Field #6. Reinventing the Sacred: Revival of the family Slava in Serbia
Field #7. The end of Real Socialism and the disintegration of the Yugoslav federal state profoundly changed the role of religion in Serbian society. The Serbian Orthodox Church experienced an upsurge not only because it was filling a perceived ideological vacuum, but also as a corner stone of nation building efforts. A unique celebration within the Serbian Orthodox tradition, the Slava, is one of the most visible ways in which religious and ethnic identities became intertwined with family life. The Slava is a celebration of an individual patron saint by a religious family and its closest friends; from the 2000s, however, it has also started to be celebrated by organizations such as schools, government institutions and private companies. The customs has also been adopted by families previously indifferent to religion. The focus of this paper is on families in the process of discovering and reviving the Slava. How does a formerly neglected tradition again gain credibility, “objectivity” of the kind that is necessary for an institution to survive? How is the concept of the sacred re-established in a modern society otherwise characterized by rationality? How are the traditional practices molded and re-interpreted by families adopting them? Hopefully, first results of an online questionnaire can be presented.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Marion MADDOX
Field #3.
Field #4. Macquarie University
Field #5.
Field #6. “We are a Christian nation”: Tracking an emerging Australian political myth
Field #7. Christian adherence in Australia has been falling since the middle of the 20th Century, with “no religion” the largest grouping in the 2016 census. Yet the idea that “Australia is a Christian nation” has become commonplace in popular political discourse. The 2011 Human Rights Commission report Freedom of Religion and Belief in Twenty-first Century Australia found “A strongly held sentiment … that Australia is a Christian nation – historically and currently – whose values and culture are based on Christian teachings” (p 22). The phrase is also a staple of letters-to-the-editor and talkback calls, emerging in discussion of such questions as various as immigration, national security, marriage law and public Christmas displays. Four political parties in the 2016 federal parliament had policies referring to Australia as a Christian nation. Through an analysis of archival data, this paper traces the emergence of an Australian political myth of Christian nationalism, considers the factors that contribute to its rises and falls, and assesses its significance in the context of Christian nationalist populisms around the world.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Yu Fukuda
Field #3.
Field #4. Tohoku University
Field #5.
Field #6. The Promise of Salvation in the Commemoration of Tsunami in Aceh and Tohoku
Field #7. Opposing his theory to postcolonial criticism, Martin Riesebrodt presents his concept of religion as applicable for comparative studies for sociology of religion. According to Riesebrodt, interactions with superhuman powers that promises salvation can be seen not only among Abrahamic religions but also in the East Asian religions beyond the Euro-American contexts. This paper attempts to assess the strength and the limits of the keyword that Riesebrodt coined, the promise of salvation, by comparing the commemorative practice after Asian tsunamis (2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake, 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake) in Indonesia and Japan. Most of the data in this studies culled from the fieldwork in Aceh, Indonesia (2014-2017) and Tohoku, Japan (2011-2013). The study focuses on the official commemoration of the tsunami observed among the two tsunami-devastated areas. The Indonesian commemoration of the tsunami can be characterized by Islamic theodicy. The victims of the tsunami been continuously referred to as martyrs which imply the hand of God behind the disaster, on the one hand, promising salvation for the hereafter on the other. In contrast, Japanese commemoration of tsunami consists of so-called "non-religious" rituals, avoiding any religious meaning for the suffering. Rituals conducted in the Japanese commemoration, however, directed towards the symbol of the victims to promise to reconstruct a disaster-proof town not to let the suffering be in vain. To conclude, the paper argues that different modes of coping with the suffering are highlighted through the theoretical lens of the promise of salvation.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion in Comics
Field #2. Pål Ketil Botvar
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Agder
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion in Valhalla and other Peter Madsen comics
Field #7. The Danish comic series Valhalla was created as the Nordic counterpart to Asterix. Like Asterix Valhalla plays around with myths from the past. Even if Valhalla concentrates on Norse mythology, one also finds comments on themes in contemporary public debate. Both in style of drawing and storytelling Valhalla draws heavily the Franco-Belgian school of bandes déssinée. The illustrator Peter Madsen also made several Bible-based graphic novels like Menneskesønnen “The Son of Man” (1995), Historien om Job “The Story of Job” (1999) and Vingeslag “Wing stroke” (2018). These comics are made in a more realistic manner. In the paper, I will compare the way religions is threated in the comics made by Peter Madsen and his collaborators. As my point of departure, I will use the Danish scholar Stig Hjarvards (2008, 2012) theory about how mediatization has influenced the reception of religion during the last decades.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Olga Iakimova
Field #3. Olga Yakimova
Field #4. Ural Federal University
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious Education in Russian Schools in the Context of Religious Majority and Minorities Rights
Field #7. Nowadays, the trend towards multi-religious tolerance based on supremacy of human rights is one of the most significant global geopolitical trends which is formed, to a great extent, by the system of school education. The focus of my research is the presence of religion in the system of secondary education in Russia. Since 2012 academic course called Fundamentals of World Religious Cultures and Secular Ethics became a compulsory part of any school educational program in Russia. The course comprises six separate modules either devoted to different religious traditions or secular that pupils can learn according to their personal choice. Although the course proclaims the aim to develop abilities of school children to interact in multicultural and multireligious society on the basics of mutual respect and dialog, it does not work properly until so far. My hypothesis is that it happens because of the clash of interests of different stakeholders involved into the process of children upbringing since educational system per se is a kind of public space. Given this, in my study I scrutinize the following issues: (1) what is the basic religious knowledge in educational process in contemporary Russia; (2) what are those links that religious confessions and contemporary school have and (3) how this all corresponds with national interests regarding the younger generation. To answer these questions I conduct a set of semi-structured interviews with stakeholders involved into the process of studying religions at school, namely: public authorities; religious confessions representatives; education officials; educators; parents; and academic community.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Green Religions and Spiritual Ecologists: Current Developments in the Field of Ecology and Religion
Field #2. Lisa Lazzarini
Field #3.
Field #4. UNL/CRIA
Field #5.
Field #6. Becoming ‘naturagents’: the shamanic eco-spiritual self-fashioning
Field #7. In this paper I intend to focus on the role of ecological concerns among shamanic practitioners on the base of my PhD research on shamanic practices in Italian and Portuguese contexts as well as through transnational networks. Shamanic practices globally disseminated since the 70s mainly in counter-cultural contexts linked to hippies and so-called new age backgrounds that largely contributed to frame ecology in a spiritual perspective. Current practitioners confirm these eco-spiritual worldviews in search for a re-enchantment with ‘nature’ through spiritual means. The representation of indigenous people as more in contact with ‘nature’ and less contaminated by ‘culture’ becomes a resource for urban shamanic practitioners to operate a self-fashioning. Although this self-fashioning is deeply oriented to an individual self-improvement, emphasizing practitioner’s individualism, ecological concerns represent in many shamanic groups a way to find a shared universal goal. I will present in this paper my fieldwork with the transnational group “Raices de la Tierra” that promotes a shamanic self-fashioning in order to become “naturagentes”, that is “guardians and custodians of life”. In their perspective spiritual change can lead to the salvation of the planet from destructive ‘western’ lifestyles that threaten it. In the parallel processes of "greening of religion" and "spiritualisation of ecology", in shamanic contexts ecology enables to envision an universal goal for individualist spiritualities: ‘saving the planet’ is for some practitioners a ‘mission’ that can be realized through shamanic self-fashioning that reconnect with ‘nature’, for instance through Temazcal and Vision Quest.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Politics, Religion and Gender in Central and Eastern Europe (joint ISSR-ISORECEA session)
Field #2. gianfranco bria
Field #3. gianfranco bria
Field #4. UniCal - CETOBAC (EHESS)
Field #5.
Field #6. Saints and women in post-socialist Albania: emotional sharing and incorporating harem.
Field #7. This work analyses the meta-narratives, the social-cultural determinations and the multi-framed practices of the veneration to Sufi shrines in contemporary Albania. The data of this work were collected during a year of ethnographic research in Albania and Kosovo: the author conducted several participating observations in the Saints’ shrine that are located in different areas and are usually linked to a particular Sufi spiritual genealogy. Almost visitors are women who (regardless their religious background) seem to express and build their religiosity thought these ritual actions. The pious, magic and symbolic (baraka) contact whit the Saints’ body shapes the religious female behavior. After 30 years of social atheism, the post-socialist period in Albania was characterized instead by an effervescent religious revival and a strong pluralization that fragmented the religious field which was contemporary framed by the secular and ecumenical nationalist rhetoric. In this post-secular space, the shrine venerations embed a symbolic and physical space (harem) bordered by women to symbolically deconstruct the male domain in the public/politic religious space: instead men are more involved in the public practices and rituals performed in tekke and mosques; the shrine visits seem to be an exclusive women’s affair detached from male religiosity. These worships would therefore be the principal means of expression of everyday female religiosity. In this sense, the borders of this harem, although invisible, are incorporated by women in the form of invisible norms, qā'ida, which assign specific social roles and symbolic spaces. Those rituals would shape a feminine, oppressive and misogynistic space, but at the same time, they forge an autonomous frame, where women can build their own imaginal and discursive worldviews, detached from male instances. The emotional commitment and pietistic narratives of the holy visits fully grasp this sense of autonomous female sub-alternity; within the walls of those sacred mausoleum, the women reproduces and reinvents themselves in the shadow of male oppression.
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Field #1. Liberation Christianity in Latin America. Politics, Religion and Spirituality in the Global South
Field #2. Flávio Munhoz Sofiati
Field #3.
Field #4. Université Fédérale de Goiás
Field #5.
Field #6. Les affinités entre le catholicisme de la libération au Brésil et le catholicisme de gauche en France
Field #7. Cette communication a pour but de discuter des éléments de la réalité sociale du catholicisme contemporain. Je cherche à comprendre les affinités entre le catholicisme de la libération au Brésil et le catholicisme de gauche en France. Les catholiques de gauche en France sont ceux qui ont une ouverture à la modernité avec une action socioreligieuse à partir de la doctrine sociale de l’Église. Les catholiques de la libération sont toutes les personnes qui ont des actions sociales et ecclésiales basées sur de la Théologie de la libération. Ainsi, la Théologie de la libération est une production théologique propre à l’Amérique Latine qui a comme centre la libération du pauvre, une notion influencée par le concept de classe sociale. La perspective théorique méthodique utilisée est ce qu’on appelle la sociologie dialectique-compréhensive. Il s’agit d’une analyse qui s’approprie des notions fondamentales du matérialisme historique dialectique marxien en utilisant des éléments de la sociologie compréhensive wébérienne. Cette articulation suit la théorie de Michael Löwy qui applique les auteurs classiques dans ses études à partir du concept d’affinité élective. Suivant l’hypothèse qu’il existe des influences importantes de la culture catholique française sur le catholicisme de la libération en Amérique Latine, j’essaye de présenter les principaux éléments d’affinité élective entre les deux formes spécifiques de catholicité.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Treating the Dead in the Aboriginal Worlds at the Age of Religious Pluralism
Field #2. Lionel Simon
Field #3.
Field #4. LAAP - Université de Louvain
Field #5.
Field #6. Sanctionner les transformations de l’être : double enterrement, « cycle fatal » et conceptions de la personne chez les Wayùu de Manaure (Colombie)
Field #7. Si la pratique du double enterrement a été bien documentée chez les Wayùu de Colombie, des éléments centraux pour saisir leur compréhension des processus à l’œuvre après le trépas ont été laissés dans l’ombre des travaux antérieurs. C’est le cas des contraintes pratiques (liées aux dimensions biologiques du décès notamment) auxquelles les protagonistes disent se plier pour choisir le moment de l’exhumation d’un corps, des dimensions spatiales des usages funéraires ou encore des procédures réservées aux personnes assassinées. En pointant la focale sur ces trois aspects méconnus des pratiques mortuaires, cette présentation entend raccrocher la pratique du double enterrement aux conceptions de la personne et de son parcours dans le monde. Celui-ci est ponctué par le passage des individus par différents états de l’être, auxquels sont attachées des modalités d’existence distinctes. Ce faisant, cette inscription de la mort dans un tissu cosmologique plus large met en lumière l’originalité d’une répartition floue et complexe entre intériorité et extériorité, laquelle autorise la simultanéité de manifestations attribuées à des êtres uniques, mais déclinés selon plusieurs modes de présence. Cette contribution se base sur une enquête de terrain de plus de quinze mois, effectuée au sein de plusieurs communautés wayùu des localités de Manaure et de Media Luna.
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Field #1. Regulating religious diversity. Politics, policies and strategies in the urban space
Field #2. Sabrina PASTORELLI
Field #3. Enzo PACE
Field #4. CNRS/Université de Padoue
Field #5.
Field #6. Les lieux de culte en Europe: tendances et évolutions // Places of worship in Europe: tendencies and evolutions
Field #7. Le droit de construire un lieu de culte est généralement reconnu en tant que manifestation de la liberté de religion. En effet, les Constitutions et les accords internationaux reconnaissent le droit de manifester sa religion ou conviction par le culte, l'enseignement, les pratiques et l'accomplissement des rites. Des limitations peuvent être prévues par les lois concernant la planification et l’aménagement territorial, la construction ou alors en considération de la sûreté et de la protection de la santé publique des immeubles destinés à accueillir du public. Au cours de ces dernières années, le droit de construire un lieu de culte a été de plus en plus questionné dans certains pays européens qui ont adopté des lois demandant le respects de certains conditions architecturales ou environnementales tellement strictes qu’un lieu de culte ne peut pas être construit sans respecter, par exemple, l’apparence extérieure de telle ou telle tradition religieuse. Au niveau local, dans certains pays, les lois sur l’aménagement du territoire concernant la construction des lieux de culte ou la transformation d’un lieu de culte déjà existant sont appliquées de manière stricte quand il s’agit de certaines communautés religieuses. Dans ce papier nous allons développer, en perspective comparative, les tendances et les évolutions de la reconnaissance du droit à manifester sa propre religion via la construction des lieux de culte dans certains pays européens tels que l’Italie, l’Allemagne, le Royaume-Uni. // The right to build a place of worship is generally conceived as the manifestation of religious freedom. As such, several national constitutions and international agreements protect the right to manifest religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance. Limitations can be provided by general rules about land use, planning, construction or aimed to protect the safety and health of buildings where a large number of persons can gather. In the last years, the right to build a place of worship is increasingly questioned in some European countries that enacted laws providing the respect of environmental and architectural requisites so strict that a new place of worship cannot be built with the external appearance that is customary in a religious tradition. In some other countries, at the local level, laws regarding the assignment of land for building places of worship or the transformation of an existing building in a place of worship are applied with particular inflexibility when the demands come from some peculiar religious communities. In this paper we would analyze the tendencies and evolutions of the right to build place of worship in some European countries such as Italy, Germany and UK in a comparative perspective.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Alberta Giorgi
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Bergamo
Field #5.
Field #6. Non una di meno (Not one [woman] less)? Female religious leaders in the Italian feminist movement
Field #7. The Italian feminist movement has been crucial for the emancipation and the recognition of the rights of Italian women, in a context for a long time characterized by traditional culture and traditional religiosity. In recent years, the movement has been gaining momentum: started as a movement against the violence against women, following the Argentinian Ni una menos, Non una di meno is now the largest political movement in Italy. As the name suggests, inclusivity is a key tenet of the movement, and its targets encompass a broad range of issues, including the defence of the abortion law and LGBT rights. Traditionally the Italian feminist movement was built against the Italian Catholic Church – and this historical legacy emerges in the suspicion surrounding all religious activists, regardless of their religion. Drawing on qualitative interviews and fieldwork in the city of Milan, this exploratory contribution investigates the experiences of inclusion and exclusion of (1) female protestant pastors engaging in and with the Italian feminist movement, and (2) Muslim women engaged against the violence against women.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The reciprocal influence of religion and demography
Field #2. Elena Prutskova
Field #3.
Field #4. St. Tikhon's Orthodox University
Field #5.
Field #6. Religiosity and fertility: the impact of social context
Field #7. Demographers argue that fertility differences between religious groups are one of the main factors behind religious population trends in contemporary societies (Hackett, McClendon 2017; Lipka, Hackett 2017). Studies showing that religiosity has a significant impact on fertility argue that some religious teachings include the norm of generativity, or that religion reduces uncertainty, or increases social capital, which allows raising more children with lower costs (Philipov, Berghammer 2007; Zhang 2011; Frejka, Westoff 2008; Adsera 2006; Heaton 2011; etc.). All these explanations are on the individual level. At the same time, religiosity influence on the number of children born differs from country to country. It is quite strong in the Mediterranean and Western European countries, while in the Post-Communist countries the relationship is much weaker. The proposed paper discusses social context factors, which explain this heterogeneity. One of the ideas found in the literature is that religion can contribute to social norms and behavior only if it is accepted by the majority as a valid basis for action. An alternative hypothesis is that religiosity impact is stronger in secularized social contexts because the members of religious groups would tend to protect their way of life from hostile social environment. Analysis based on the European Values Study data (2008) shows that neither of the proposed explanations fit the data well. Linear and multilevel regression models support introducing a third argument. Religiosity influence on fertility is stronger in social context where early religious socialization rate (attending church regularly during formative years) is higher.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Luca Bossi
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Turin - Department of Cultures, Politics and Societies
Field #5.
Field #6. From invisibility to voice. Politics and policies on religious diversity in the city of Turin
Field #7. Contemporary city represents a composite scenario: the coexistence of different cultures, religions and spiritualities testifies to the many forms of expression, belonging and participation of its citizens. Urban space can be seen as the social field in which the religious diversification of European societies emerges and assumes visibility. Instead of representing inert scenarios, cities contribute in shaping contemporary forms of religious life: they are the non-neutral arena in which private and public actors negotiate the rules of coexistence, experiment otherness, cooperate or compete for material and symbolic resources. From this point of view, local public institutions increasingly stand at the forefront in the management of religion-driven needs. This contribution presents the results of a research conducted in the city of Turin, Italy: focusing on politics and policies about religious groups, the work analyses the role of different political and religious actors over the last thirty years. The archival research on Council activity highlighted two different phases of the local political debate: an ethnic phase during which political opposition concerns were mostly concentrated on cultural diversity and then, starting from 9/11, a religious phase with a strong emphasis on Islam. While facing the repressive approach of the political opposition, city government put in action a strategy of governance aiming at the regulation of both material and symbolic space. Instead of being excluded from the public and political space, together with other religious groups Muslim organisations have been involved in the common definition of needs, rules and policies, and so placed at the centre of institutional activities. Born as a reply to Islamophobia, based on recognition and participation, the local governance of religious diversity seems to have contributed to the definition of a new public role of religiosity in itself.
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Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Haimo Schulz Meinen
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Hannover
Field #5.
Field #6. Sociology of religion to stop double complicity with colonialism
Field #7. „’Critical religion’ .. takes .. postcolonial .. perspectives to analyze the ideological function of the religious-secular distinction“ (Horii 2018:2), „at the mystified foundations of [...] Anglo-American colonial and neo-colonial power formations.“ (Fitzgerald 2018, Post-colonial Remains:11) „Postcolonial thought challenges us to recognize and trouble social science’s epistemic complicity with [1] empire“ (Go 2016: 101, ital. orig.) and with [2] „the ‚colonization of nature‘ (Fischer-Kowalski/Haberl 1997), [...] socially organized activities that alter natural systems in order to increase the benefits to humans obtained from those systems“ such as „land use, the cultivation of livestock and useful plants“. (Haberl et al. 2010:3) „The elite-directed cultural innovations and social transformations [...] led to [...] increases in energy consumption. [...] Foragers drew their energy [...], an estimated 5.000 kilocalories per capita per day.“ (Bodley 2011: 340) „Global energy consumption [...] reached 122 quadrillion kilocalories .. annually by the year 2007“ (Bodley 2011: 341), provoking global climate change, pollution and devastation of many low level territories like in Fidchi. „It is estimated that the per-capita weight of raw material consumed per year [...] [grew] from one metric ton in the tribal world to [...] an average of nearly 20 tons in the industrialized nations by the late twentieth century“, (Bodley 2011:342) where „only a few are wealthy and powerful. Elite-directed growth has flipped the social pyramid in comparison with the tribal world.“ (Bodley 2011: 343) Decolonization asks how to stop this double complicity and how to „shift the world’s intellectual power relations.“ (Spickard 2017:255) (249 words)
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Field #1. Religious Diversity and Political Conflict in Europe
Field #2. Laura Lots
Field #3. Antonius Liedhegener
Field #4. Center for Religion, Economy and Politics (ZRWP); University of Lucerne, Switzerland
Field #5.
Field #6. Conflict or Cooperation? New Dynamics in Public Policy on Religion in Germany and Switzerland
Field #7. State religious policies became markedly more contested across Europe in recent years. Parties and governments engaged in debating and regulating religious diversity. In particular, conflicts about the status and role of Islam and Muslim minorities figured large in public debate and political contest. Frequently issues about Islam and religious freedom were a matter of public policy and regulations of nation states. However, in many instances this new state religious policy is not confined to Muslim minorities. Due to a growing or at least as such perceived religious diversity, general questions about the relationship of state and church/religion arose. The paper addresses the question of how this new dynamic in state religious policy relates to social and political conflict. It presents a comparative analysis on this question for Germany and Switzerland. Both countries follow a human rights approach to religion, both have a federal approach of dealing with religion on a national and subnational level and both have a long record of dealing with religious diversity. In particular, after 1945 both countries opted for resolving political issues on religion by installing a system of legal and practical cooperation between state agencies and churches. One of the key questions of current state religious politics is to what extend it is an extension of such a cooperative style of politics or an expression of new forms of conflicts related to religion and secular liberal democracy. The paper is based on our database covering cases of state religious policy from 1990 onwards. It will elaborate on the key concepts ‘state religious policy’ and ‘religious conflict’ and present a systematic comparison of cases in order to answer the question of the role and potential causes for conflict and cooperation in state religious policy. Thus, it contributes to an empirical understanding of the type and strength of conflictivity related to the practice of religion in contemporary liberal democracies.
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Field #1. Religion and women’s public participation
Field #2. Sonya Sharma
Field #3. Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham
Field #4. Kingston University London
Field #5.
Field #6. Women Healthcare Chaplains: Public, Personal and Political
Field #7. Women chaplains work in the public domain of healthcare where social and religious changes are magnified. They deal with human fragility and wellbeing and navigate the intersections of faiths, values, communities and cultures. In a recent study in hospital settings in London and Vancouver, women chaplains’ work was vital to the delivery of healthcare, attending to the marginalized, vulnerable patients and families, and over-worked staff. Their work revealed the array of religious and nonreligious perspectives and traditions they come into contact with on a daily basis among hospital constituents. In hearing their stories, we learned that their work was not only personal but political. It was not unusual for them to transgress gendered and racialized structures, and in so doing, challenge relations of power. In this paper, we consider examples of the work of women healthcare chaplains from our research sites. We discuss the nature of their work in public life, the tensions they confronted and the strategies they negotiated for living well together.
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Matouš Vencálek
Field #3.
Field #4. Department for the Study of Religions, Masaryk University
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious, Socio-cultural and Political Worldviews of Modern Pagans in the Czech Republic
Field #7. Modern Paganism is a small yet growing global religious movement that remains to a great extent under-researched. This paper presents the results of a research inspired by Helen Berger’s Pagan Census, conducted among Modern Czech Pagans. It explores the worldviews of Czech Pagans from different Pagan groups regarding the questions of spirituality (e.g. the beliefs about afterlife, reincarnation or magic), society and culture (e.g. LGBTQ+ rights, drugs or the status of women in society) and politics (e.g. regarding the market regulation, social welfare, as well as specific political party preferences). It focuses on the differences, as well as on the commonalities among various Pagan groups, as the Pagan movement is highly diversified and sprouts from several different sources: some groups have emerged from naturalizing and romanticizing tendencies and emphasize the sacredness of nature, worship, and respect for all of its creatures; while some groups have emerged from rather nationalistic tendencies and focus on the worship of the gods and ancestors with a strong emphasis on ethnic background.
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Field #1. Redefining ‘secularism’: European states and the regulation of (minority) religions
Field #2. Linnea Lundgren
Field #3.
Field #4. Ersta Skondal College University
Field #5.
Field #6. Diversity vs Social Cohesion: The Changing Politics of Religion in Sweden
Field #7. Across Europe, governments and other public authorities increasingly seem to view religious communities as important actors within civil society, thereby intentionally or unintentionally bringing religion back into the public arena. However, whilst on the one hand they seem to be viewed as a resource, a positive and integrative factor in society that should be included in welfare provision, on the other hand they seem to be perceived as a risk, a problem and conflict-related factor that needs to be controlled and managed. Taking the perspective of how minority religious communities are portrayed in major Swedish government documents between 1958-2018, this paper, investigates the roles and responsibilities of minority religious communities. Specifically, the paper studies how and to what extent minority religious communities have pushed back against and/or acquiesced/collaborated with the state, and how has this changed historically in the light of changes such as increased religious diversity, a changed relationship between state and church, and more generally an altered relationship between state and civil society with respect to the production of welfare and the promotion of democracy and diversity. Also, the paper studies to what extent these changes are associated with tensions and ambiguities regarding the role of minority religious communities in the public, as opposed to private, sphere. The results suggest that from the perspective of the Swedish state the role of minority religious communities has been considerably renegotiated during the studied time period.
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Field #1. Redefining ‘secularism’: European states and the regulation of (minority) religions
Field #2. Yasuyuki Matsunaga
Field #3. Umut Azak
Field #4. Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
Field #5.
Field #6. The State Regulations of Minority Religions in Comparative Perspective
Field #7. This paper examines two cases of state regulation of minority religions in two non-European states and draws conclusions relevant to contemporary European states. In Turkey, the state control of the religious sphere is institutionalized under the guise of specific discourse of secularism. In Iran, Shi‘ite Islam as the state religion is overtly, officially and legally dominating the public sphere. As in many existing nation-states, however, the state regulation of minority religions in both nations is neither simply about enforcing secularism nor, for that matter, Islamism--its reverse. For being associated with a minority religion more often than not is yet another dimension of being an ethnic minority. Non-Sunni (Alevi) Kurdish minority in Turkey has been considered one of the most serious threats to the hegemonic Sunni-Turkish identity throughout republican history. The predicaments of Sunni Kurds in Iran constitutes a multifaceted and polysemic case in which the-central-state-led secularism-turned-political Shi‘ism consistently marginalized a borderland community with ethno-religious distinction from the majority of the nation. By focusing on these Kurdish minorities (Alevi Kurds in Turkey and Sunni Kurds in Iran), the paper will argue that these seemingly different (secularist and Shi‘ite) models of state regulations of religion can be seen as mirror images in terms of their specific management of minority ethno-religious communities. It then concludes that the state regulations of minority religions in the two settings reflect a similar dynamic of marginalization, one that connects to the historical and contemporary experiences of some European states.
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Field #1. Field perspective and reverse angle: Politics of fieldwork in religious contexts
Field #2. Joan Stavo-Debauge
Field #3.
Field #4. Unil
Field #5.
Field #6. Les embarras de la parole religieuse : une cartographie à la croisée de deux enquêtes
Field #7. Dans cette communication, je reviendrai sur deux enquêtes, d’un genre différent. La première est une enquête conceptuelle et historique sur les théories post-séculières, tant en philosophie qu’en sociologie et en anthropologie des religions. La seconde est une enquête empirique consacrée à « l’embarras de la parole religieuse » en contexte séculier, enquête menée avec Philippe Gonzalez et Marta Roca i Escoda à partir d’un corpus d’émissions radiophoniques en France et en Suisse. En croisant les résultats de ces deux enquêtes, il s’agira d’analyser les formes contrastées de l’embarras des paroles religieuses pour le christianisme et pour l’islam, en articulant deux axes : l'axe énonciation/réception et l’axe conservatisme/libéralisme. Le premier axe distingue les embarras selon qu’il pèse sur l’énonciation de la parole ou sur sa réception, le second distingue les paroles en question selon qu’elle proviennent d’une tradition conservatrice ou libérale (d’un point de vue théologique et politique). À partir de ces deux axes, et en mobilisant les deux terrains d’enquête mentionnés ci-avant, on observera alors ce qui distingue le christianisme et l’islam quant aux embarras des paroles publiques (y compris celles proférées dans le cadre de discours sociologiques et anthropologiques) qui s’en réclament ou les contestent.
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Field #1. The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments
Field #2. Ioannis Gaitanidis
Field #3.
Field #4. Chiba University
Field #5.
Field #6. Critisizing spiritual prosumption from within: the case of the anti-spirituality discourse in contemporary Japan
Field #7. Although it is now well accepted that “there is a religious dimension to consumption at the same time that religion has been commoditized” (Gauthier, Woodhead, Martikainen 2013, 18), a subject less discussed in the scholarly literature is that of the negotiations surrounding the monetary value attributed to acts of spiritual prosumption. As Andrew Dawson has described, spiritual prosumption is a combination of self as agent (producer), beneficiary (product), and aesthete (consumer) through the transformative dynamics of the alternative religious repertoire (Dawson 2013, 141-142). Typical examples, from aura therapists to spiritual counselors, have been prominently active in Japan since at least the last twenty years, answering to both global and local trends of religion in post-industrial societies. Although popular criticism for fraud and embezzlement has often targeted such activities, especially when conducted in an organized manner under the umbrella of religious organizations, the market of spiritual therapies in Japan has recently seen an anti-spiritual movement rising from within the community of spiritual prosumers. This movement is small and mostly active online, but it characteristically accuses the spiritual market not for being marketized, but for following the “wrong” path of marketization. This presentation will explore this discourse through interviews with spiritual therapists and online discussions. Dawson, Andrew 2013. Entagled modernity and commodified religion: Alternative spirituality and the ‘new middle class’. In Religion in Consumer Society: Brands, Consumers and Markets, Francois Gauthier and Tuomas Martikainen, eds. 127-142. Ashgate.
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Field #1. Spiritual transformation and political engagement
Field #2. Amir Sheikhzadegan
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Fribourg
Field #5.
Field #6. “I thought, something must be done”: extra-parliamentary political engagement of Muslim (re-)converts with Salafi tendencies in Switzerland
Field #7. Converts and re-converts (also called reverts/born-agains) both go through a process of spiritual transformation (Paloutzian 2005), and both experience a reshuffling of their social identities (Travisano 1970; Gooren 2010). This identity transformation often implies making clear-cut symbolic boundaries that can translate into a strong (re-)affiliation with, and engagement for, the target faith. Against this theoretical background, the study deals with the questions as to what circumstances lead to a (re-)conversion to Salafi Islam and what motivates the respective individuals to engage in a political cause related to their (new) faith. Applying the method of narrative-biographic interviews, the study focuses on Muslim (re-)converts in Switzerland who have joined the Salafi Muslim organization Hidaya (pseudonym), in order to push through a societal acceptance for their reading of Islam. The findings of the study so far show that (re-)conversion to Salafi Islam can be traced back to different factors including a search of meaning of life, a yearning for attachment and sense of community, a longing for a “methodization of life conduct” (Wohlrab-Sahr 1999), an identification with the lot of marginalized Muslims, social contacts to Muslims, a search for a consistent world-view, personal experiences of religious discrimination, or a combination of these circumstances. Furthermore, political action provides Salafi (re-)converts with a strong social network, a sense of belonging, an unequivocal purpose of life, and helps them develop a sense of self-esteem as well as a “pious self” (Jouili/Amir‐Moazami 2006). These changes lead in turn to a reshuffling of their earlier social contacts.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Anna Fedele
Field #3.
Field #4. CRIA-Lisbon University Institute
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion, Spirituality, Secularism and Gender at the Marian Shrine of Fátima
Field #7. Based on fieldwork in Fátima (Portugal), this paper explores the complex entanglements of religion, spirituality, gender and secularism among pilgrims visiting this Marian shrine in occasion of the celebrations of the centenary of the apparitions of Our Lady of Fátima. Analysing their life stories, as well as their creative approaches to the official narratives of the apparitions and the main places of devotions, I will show how the pilgrims oscillate between what they identify as (Catholic) ‘religion’ and what they call ‘spirituality’. The pilgrims tend to use what I describe as a ‘spirituality language’ especially when they are confronted with issues related to gender equality, interreligious dialogue and other topics towards which they feel they have opinions that may diverge from the official position of Catholic authorities. This spirituality language allows the pilgrims to find a middle way between their Catholic religion and the secular criticism they encounter in their everyday lives.
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Field #1. The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments
Field #2. Alberto Moreira
Field #3.
Field #4. PUC Goiás
Field #5.
Field #6. The spectacular religion. The market driven aestheticization of religion in Brazil
Field #7. The modern aestheticization process of culture as a consequent unfolding of market rationality expansion into the subjective life and the libidinal sphere of subjects has deep impact in the religious field. In this paper I try to inquire about the changes in (Christian) religion as it lays under the impact of capitalist sensation-seeking culture and, on the other side, how religion itself interacts with the inflation of aesthetics and its market driven mechanisms. As theoretical background I use the studies of Türcke, Welsch and Schultze to defend that an aestheticization process of social life is going on and to analyze its features; in a second step, following Dufour, Jhally and Welsch, I face the question how the dynamics of aestheticization impacts people´s life; finally, analyzing some concrete case studies and examples of deep aestheticized Neopentecostal churches in Brazil and in the US, I develop some criteria to frame the process and try to respond the question of how (Christian) religion is being transformed by the ubiquitous market driven aesthetics and its sensation-seeking culture. Some consequences and further developments for the religious field laying under permanent competition and aesthetics dominance are proposed in the conclusion. Key words: Aestheticization; Capitalism; Religion; Aesthetics; Neopentecostalism
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Field #1. The Social Construction of Reality and the sociology of religion
Field #2. Orivaldo Pimentel Lopes Jr.
Field #3.
Field #4. UFRN
Field #5.
Field #6. Socio construction of reality and the peculiar contribution of sociology to the subject-object relation
Field #7. It is in the complexity of the subject-object relation that all human knowledge processes itself. When we see the gap between subject-object fields, that push us into a dis-junction, we realize how much it is necessary to take in account all its complexity. The Peter Berger and Thomas Luckman SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF REALITY theory releases us from any static and simplified connotation of the subject/object relation. For us humans, object is a product socially constructed; it is something that is submitted to the action of the human beings: be like built artifacts, be like concepts, be be like the language itself, be like the institutions, beliefs, etc. In the triangle of EXTERIORIZATION, OBJECTIVATION and INTERNALIZATION, object has a vortex, and subject has two. So, in Berger and Luckman theory the broken reality of subject is very well established. But, the unity of object is questionable. The Karl Popper’s theory of the three worlds is diametrically opposed to the social Construction of object because there are two vortexes in the object field and only one in the subject. We propose in this paper to overlap both perspectives and jump from a bi-dimensional image of a triangle and figure out both theories with a tree-dimensional image of a tetrahedron. The fracture present now not only in the subject but also in the object brings epistemological and methodological consequences that we synthesize in the expression “Knowledge Partnership”.
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Field #1. The politics of religious diversity: the case of chaplaincy
Field #2. Jo Bryant
Field #3.
Field #4. Cardiff University
Field #5.
Field #6. “It’s so political, chaplaincy, isn’t it? With a small ‘p’”: Understanding the Politics of Multi-Faith Chaplaincy in the English NHS
Field #7. Until the 1990s, minority religions in Britain were primarily recognised within a broader framework of ethnicity and race (Knott 2014). The 1991 NHS Patient’s Charter is the first known political recognition of religious diversity in British public life, prefiguring the state’s explicit recognition of minority religions following the introduction of the Human Rights Act in 1998. It is in this context of state recognition of religion as a sui generis category that NHS chaplaincy in England has become increasingly multi-faith in character. This paper will outline findings from a qualitative study exploring how far religious minorities are integrated into healthcare chaplaincy, comprising case studies with six chaplaincy teams across England. I will explore how six key issues affect what Fraser (2003) calls ‘participatory parity’, including resource (Swift 2014); representation (Dinham and Lowndes 2008; Beckford 2015); gatekeeping (Beckford and Gilliat 1996); the somatic norm (Puwar 2001); the use of ‘legitimate language’ (Bourdieu 1991b); and contested religious authority (Swift 2014). I will show that chaplaincy constitutes a critical microcosm for exploring religion-state relations, and also provides a significant opportunity to rehabilitate Bourdieu’s approach to religion. This will be achieved with reference to the religious ‘field' (Bourdieu 1991a; Verter 2003) and ‘legitimate language’ (Bourdieu 1991b), in order to move beyond Bourdieu’s preoccupation with religious hegemony and explore how the place of religion is negotiated in the public sphere.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Ferruccio Biolcati Rinaldi
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Milan
Field #5.
Field #6. CARPE (Church Attendance and Religious change Pooled European dataset): a cumulative dataset to study religious change in Europe
Field #7. Despite the long-lasting interest on religious change, debates on the topic have been heated and are far from being settled. In order to provide a reliable data source to study these dynamics, the CARPE project cumulates high-quality international surveys containing items concerning religiosity (ESS, Eurobarometer, EVS, ISSP, WVS). This makes possible to broad the observation window across countries and over time. Moreover, the comparison among different studies enables researchers to analyze the consistency of the results, minimizing the impact of random fluctuation and providing useful information on the degree of confidence that can be placed in the estimates. The main target of this cumulating procedure is the variable regarding church attendance, which has been harmonized in many different ways. The CARPE research group is currently working to archive the aggregate version of the dataset (version 1.4) in order to make it available for the social sciences community. The aggregate version of the dataset contains country-year specific figures of religious practice for 45 countries spanning the period 1970-2016: the dataset cumulates 1665 national surveys. In addition, it reports both descriptive information about denominational belonging and socio-demographics information like the mean age, the gender distribution and the level of education. The presentation aims to present the dataset composition, the harmonization procedure we have adopted, the strategy we used to combine the datasets and the reliability tests we have performed. Finally, the presentation will illustrate some possible applications of CARPE dataset.
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Field #1. Religious configurations and transformation in Latin America
Field #2. PRISCILA SOUZA
Field #3.
Field #4. UNIVERSIDADE DO PORTO
Field #5.
Field #6. Aves de Jesus: a northeast Brazilian religious expression
Field #7. Within the popular Latin American Catholicism context, stands out the Brazilian Northeast, specially the state of Ceará, having in the person of Priest Cícero the basis for the religious diversity dissemination and also for new traditional and millenarian religious configurations existence. This work consists of an institutional Catholic marginal community case study and its concrete empirical realities: The Penitentes do Braço da Cruz or Aves de Jesus. The fact that this group belong to a singular religious culture based on the institutional Catholic ideology makes this study very important. Supplied with unconscious influences from other movements and/or surrounding groups, this rural, poor, illiterate and abandoned group has a mystical religious bias quite often treated as fanaticism. Its members don’t follow the dominant religion but rather a mixture of it and a vast array of moral concepts influences resulting from their living conditions itself. What is conventionally called popular religiosity is in real the force and the triggering element of the ancient reality destruction and the construction of a new one. Giving up their own bodies, not having shower neither having sex; to the point of changing their own names, turns these “Josés and Marias” a public highlight giving rise to discussions and controversies involving religious, social, media and even political sectors.
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Field #1. Major Transformations in Latin American Religious Practices: Globalization, Transnationalization, and Pentecostalization
Field #2. Ari Pedro ORO
Field #3.
Field #4. Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul à Porto Alegre Brazil
Field #5.
Field #6. Brazilian evangelical transnationalization towards Europe: meanings, typology, and accommodations
Field #7. This paper aims to examine the transnationalization of Brazilian evangelical churches that many decades ago accomplish the “reverse mission” to Europe. We analyze the meanings linked to this process, we suggest a typology of religious transnationalization composed of four different models and finally we explain the dynamics and practices undertaken by these Brazilian churches to overcome cultural differences and to adapt to the European cultures.
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Field #1. Seeking the Others: exploring transcultural religious expansion from/to/across Latin America
Field #2. Gimenez Beliveau Veronica
Field #3.
Field #4. CEIL/ CONICET/ UBA
Field #5.
Field #6. Les langages du religieux: circulations interreligieuses et transnationales en Amérique Latine
Field #7. À partir des années 1960 et 1970 on assiste à la reconfiguration du paysage religieux latino-américain. La naissance de courants affirmant des valeurs et des objectifs par la création de communautés qui articulent des traditions religieuses diverses est l’un des éléments de ce champ nouveau. Ces espaces, œcuméniques d’abord et interreligieux plus tard, se proposent travailler sur des problèmes sociaux concrets. Les religions répondent à des préoccupations de leurs fidèles et affirment des discours et des pratiques les permettant une intervention sur des discussions contemporaines, au même temps qu’elles font jouer leur propre perspective sur les circonstances du monde moderne. Dans le cadre d’un paysage religieux où le catholicisme est majoritaire, les langages et les pratiques circulent produisant des différents espaces de sens, créant des circuits religieux pluridirectionnels au sein desquels se cristallisent des pratiques et des discours qui traversent les frontières nationales et confessionnelles. Ces nœuds de sens se situent dans des différentes pôles idéologiques, et s’étalent à travers le temps. À partir d’ethnographies réalisées en Argentine en dans d’autres pays d’Amérique Latine, nous travaillerons ici quatre espaces : le pole des droits de l’homme, le pôle de la santé et la guérison, le pôle de l’écologie et des migrants/ réfugiés, le pôle de la « défense de la vie depuis la conception ». La consolidation de ces communautés demande un travail profond d’atténuation des éléments conflictuels et une quête de possibilités d’action commune, concrétée à l’intérieur des communautés.
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Field #1. Religion in Comics
Field #2. Tatsuya Yumiyama
Field #3.
Field #4. Tokyo Institute of Technology
Field #5.
Field #6. Religiosity in Japanese Comics (Manga)
Field #7. The purpose of this study is to explore functions of religiosity in Japanese manga. Recently, "pilgrimage" which young generation consider the location of scenes in manga and animation as equivalent to holy places and visit these places became very popular. This pilgrimage is being used throughout Japan as a way to boost the development or revitalization of local communities. The origin of this style that young people pursue to experience events in manga as real is found in a legendary boxing manga, 'Ashita no Jo (Tomorrow's Joe)' serialized from 1968 to 1973. This manga influenced baby boomer. And a real funeral service was held for its character. In 1970 hijackers claimed responsibility referencing ‘Joe’ in their letter and the first-ever skyjacking made this manga a social phenomenon. Manga has generated a sense of values and young generation have discovered a way of living, additionally learned the view of life and death through manga. Focusing on these relationships, this study examine religiosity in manga in Japan.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Per Pettersson
Field #3.
Field #4. Karlstad University and Uppsala University, Sweden
Field #5.
Field #6. The Social Construction of “Religion” and “Universal” Human Rights – a critical sociological analysis
Field #7. The category “religion” is multifaceted, different socially constructed in various cultural contexts, and in some not even existing. What is regarded as secular practices in one context is socially constructed as religion in another. As part of globalization and global migration this diversity in the understanding of “religion” has caused renewed interest in Human rights special notion of the category “religion”. There is also a tendency by both majority and minority groups to “religionize” the ethnical and cultural differences. The lack of a clear definition of the category “religion” is relatively unproblematic when used in private daily life. But it becomes a problem when “religion” is used and applied used without definition in social practice like public debate, political discourse, in cases of conflict or in courts. The concept religion becomes especially decisive when it has legal implications or affects people’s practical lives in serious ways. One significant example concern the principle “Freedom of religion”; the right to practise your own religion, and the right to freedom from religion. Results from empirical research show increasing divergence between individuals’ religion in terms of belonging, believing and practicing. What has previously been socially constructed as religious practices thereby becomes increasingly visible as “secular” cultural practices, not directly linked to belonging or beliefs of a certain religious tradition or group. This paper question if the category “religion” is at all useful in the context of supposed “universal” Human rights when the social construction of “religion” is so diverse and additionally becomes increasingly individualised.
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Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Elisabeth Arweck
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Warwick
Field #5.
Field #6. How does Religious Education Shape Young People’s Attitudes to Religion and Religious Diversity? Reporting Data from a UK-wide Study
Field #7. The presentation will report data gathered during a three-year project (2009–2012) at the University of Warwick, UK, which explored the attitudes of 13–16 year-old pupils across the United Kingdom (England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Scotland) towards religious diversity. The project took a mixed method and multidisciplinary approach, including sociological, pedagogical, theological, and psychological aspects. It collected both qualitative and quantitative data through focus group discussions with, and a survey by questionnaire of, young people in secondary schools. The presentation will take a mainly sociology of religion perspective, to explore how Religious Education (RE) at school shapes young people’s attitudes to religion and religious diversity. Does RE contribute to young people’s religious socialisation? Do young people value RE as a subject? What are their perceptions of the content of RE? What are the skills and knowledge that young people derive from RE? How do young people relate what they learn in RE with their experiences outside school? Where does the notion of ‘nonreligion’ fit in young people’s perceptions of RE? These are questions which the proposed presentation will address in examining the discussions with the young people and their responses to the questionnaire.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Cristiano Vezzoni
Field #3. Riccardo Ladini
Field #4. University of Milan - Dep Social and Political Sciences
Field #5.
Field #6. Attitudes toward immigrants and individual religiosity: A study based on ESS and EVS data
Field #7. Immigration has become an increasingly salient issue in the European public debate. For example, in Italy, among pundits and commentators, changing attitudes toward immigration has been considered one of the main causes of the outstanding success of populist movements in 2018 elections. Observing the prevalence of negative attitudes towards migrants and understanding their main determinants becomes thus urgent in such turbulent times. Data coming from ESS (R8, 2016-17) and EVS (2017-18) offer a valuable opportunity to achieve this task in a comparative European framework. Comparing the two surveys, we will consider both a description of attitudes toward immigrants and their association with individual religiosity. In fact, notwithstanding the official Catholic discourse inspired to the idea of an unconditional hospitality to the newcomers, some anti-immigrant movements have stressed the role of the mainstream Christian heritage as an element of opposition to the acceptance of immigrants of a different religious background. Following a parallel surveys research design, possible discrepancies in both levels and association between the indicators of anti-immigration attitudes and individual religiosity will be discussed. We finally will speculate on which effects can influence potential biases, considering those aspects that vary between the two surveys.
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Field #1. Politics, Religion and Gender in Central and Eastern Europe (joint ISSR-ISORECEA session)
Field #2. Dinka Marinovic Jerolimov
Field #3. Nikolina Hazdovac Bajic
Field #4. Institute for Social Research in Zagreb
Field #5.
Field #6. Anti-gender movement in Europe - How Croatia fits in?
Field #7. During the recent decade a new movement emerged in Europe, which claims to oppose gender and mobilizes against some of it’s, they say, most pernicious effects. These campaigns, which all bear a striking resemblance, have emerged in different parts of the continent. They share discourses, strategies and modes of action across borders, observe what each other is doing and are increasingly connected trans-nationally. Scholars have described similar mobilizations against gender equality in other parts of the world as well (Kuhar, Paternotte, 2017). Following Jose Casanova, scholars also examined the de-privatization of religion and the “reactive politicization” of gender and sexual politics by religious movements and point to the fact that this process is accompanied with NGOization of religious actors and by secularization of their discourse. This process goes along with the process that seeks to reaffirm religion in public space, and often intersects with issues related to nationalism and defense of national sovereignty. Croatian homogenization in the national and religious sense from the beginning of the nineties was accompanied by repatriarhalization that indicates the relationship of domination in which definition of the majority and dominant group implies the ability to „exclude, to leave out, to render 'outside'“ (Hall, 1986, 5-6). Croatian recent mobilizations against “gender ideology” shares a number of similarities with some other European countries, and most of the mobilizing and contesting strategies and associated tools that have been employed elsewhere. The Croatian movement one can regard as particularly successful for different reasons. First, it has strongly voiced the opposition to comprehensive school-based sex education and legally blocked same-sex marriage. Also, it has legitimized a new discourse about faith-based morality and traditional values and, by putting pressure on their liberal adversaries and their ideas by claiming to represent a silent majority, it has rattled the common public perspective on gender and sexuality matters (Hodžić, Štulhofer eds, 2017). In this paper, authors analyze the latest anti-gender mobilization in Croatia led by different NGOs concerning the ratification of Istanbul Convention in Croatian Parliament. The analysis will include web pages of the NGOs, materials they disseminate (videos, leaflets, billboards), their public activities (Facebook campaign, rallies, lobbying, cooperation with Catholic Church and other religious communities) as well as media coverage of the events.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Pope Francis, Religious Authority and the Media
Field #2. Marco Marzano
Field #3. Marco Marzano
Field #4. Università di Bergamo
Field #5.
Field #6. The odd alliance: how mass-media created the pope star
Field #7. n the past few years, the mass-media and the Catholic Church has been realised a peculiar alliance. The alliance has been realised on Pope Francis. The mass-media found in the pope one of the exceptional figure that they always need, the Church with Francis tried to remedy to the deep crisis that is afflicting the organization by moving the public opinion focus from its internal conflicts, sexual scandals and the eventuality to introduce important and radicals structural reforms. The myth of “Francis the revolutionary” has been progressively built by the mass media (with the consent of the ecclesial hierarchy and the pope himself) trough some sharp communicative strategies: 1) the emphasis on some “populist” gestures of the pope (as the use of old shoes, the leaving of the papal apartment in favour of Santa Marta and in general the abdication of luxury) ….. 2) the accurate selection of the most popular values and beliefs in the European contemporary societies in the Pope’s messages (the acceptance of omosexuality, the focus on social deprivation, the emphasis on love and forgiveness, on the image of a “good and merciful God”) leaving out the focus all the traditional and “strict” aspects of the catholic doctrine present in Francis’ speeches. The manipulation of the image of the pope in this way has been possible by a constant “decontextualization” of his words and by simultaneous identification of the Roman Curia as the number one enemy of his political project. The paper analyses this process using the empirical analysis of Vatican’s news and facts on four Italian newspapers.
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Field #1. Hybrid religious identities: methodological implications
Field #2. Maria Klingenberg
Field #3.
Field #4. Uppsala University
Field #5.
Field #6. Youth and Religion in Sweden: Variations of non-religion and religion from a methodological perspective
Field #7. This paper addresses how to account for the variation of non-religion and religion through a survey directed to 16 to 24-year-olds in Sweden. The Swedish youth population presents an interesting case of hybrid positions in the majority. For the majority, relations to religion is described through negations – they do not understand themselves as religious, they do not come from religious homes, and do not attend religious services regularly. At the same time, the historical connection between the majority population and the Church of Sweden is reflected in figures of religious affiliation and more implicit patterns of (cultural) belonging. Besides the majority, the Swedish population also includes an increasing number of members of religious minorities, where patterns of belief and belonging to a religious tradition are both more and less hybrid in character. The hybrid positions coupled with religious diversity found in populations have methodological implications, not least for quantitative studies. This paper addresses the ways in which specific survey questions and methods can capture various orientations amongst those who do not understand themselves as religious, while also accounting for the variations of belief and practice amongst those who strongly identify with a religious tradition.
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Field #1. Media dynamics of nationalism and religion
Field #2. Mia Lövheim
Field #3. Linnea Jensdotter
Field #4. Uppsala University, Department of Theology, Sociology of religion
Field #5.
Field #6. Banal religion and National identity in hybrid media spaces
Field #7. References to religion, in particular Islam, have increased in Swedish parliamentary debates as well as in secular media. Debates on opinion pages and social media tend to cluster around tensions between liberal-secular values considered fundamental to Sweden as a democratic society, such as gender equality, and freedom of religion. These debates intersect with the emergence of new actors and lines of conflict in the political landscape, often drawing on popular and affective arguments. In a recent survey, more than one-fourth of Swedish respondents state that they discuss news on religious extremism daily or weekly. Individuals with a traditional/authoritarian orientation seem more inclined to discuss these issues in social media, and also more inclined to view Islam as a threat to national culture. In response to this sessions’ call for theoretical models to analyse the media dynamics of the interplay between nationalism and religion in contemporary Europe, this paper will discuss how mediatization of religion theory can be used to understand discussions of religion in comments to news events involving religion on Facebook. In particular, the paper will discuss how the concept of “banal religion”, previously used to analyse individualized forms of religion in entertainment media (Hjarvard 2012) might be developed for an analysis of how mediatized religious elements, by drawing on and reinforcing common sense understandings of religion, might be used in processes of selectively embraced religion as a civilizational identity (Brubaker 2017).
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. E.-Martin Meunier
Field #3. Jean-Philippe Perreault
Field #4. Université d'Ottawa / Université Laval
Field #5.
Field #6. Les virtuoses et la thérapeutique. Recomposition de la religiosité catholique au Québec
Field #7. Depuis 2001, plusieurs indicateurs de la religiosité au Québec montrent un essoufflement de la configuration dominante que constitue depuis les années 1960 le catholicisme culturel. La chute des taux de baptêmes, la baisse de l’appartenance, les volontés laïcistes, l’arrivée sur scène de nouvelles générations ayant reçu peu ou prou une socialisation religieuse sont à placer au nombre des causes de cet essoufflement. S’y joue une transformation en profondeur des rapports religion et culture et la mise en place d’un nouveau régime de religiosité dont la montée des « sans religions » est sans contredit une des manifestations visibles. Mais il ne s’agit là que d’un pôle de ce nouveau régime. À l’autre bout du spectre se retrouvent également des catholiques fortement engagés à l’identité religieuse assumée et revendiquée. Les récits de vie de ces « virtuoses » donnent à voir comment cette recomposition opère et quelle en est la trame narrative. Quels sont les traits de la religiosité de ce nouveau régime ? Quelles en sont les dynamiques et les tensions ? Sur quelles assises culturelles et quelles formes de socialisation se déploient les systèmes de croyances et de spiritualités contemporaines ? Dans cette communication, nous nous proposons de présenter une part des résultats préliminaires portant spécifiquement sur cette cohorte à partir de données recueillies dans le cadre d’un projet de recherche sur la transformation du catholicisme culturel (2016-2020) au Québec.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Towards an empirical analysis of interreligious dialogue
Field #2. Jenn Lindsay
Field #3.
Field #4. John Cabot University
Field #5.
Field #6. "Lived Religious Pluralism" in Rome and in the Middle East and Implications for the Empirical Analysis of Interreligious Dialogue
Field #7. This presentation will review the results of an ethnographic study of interreligious dialogue in Rome and in the Middle East conducted between 2015-2017. The analysis of the data is guided by the questions of how interfaith encounters and social transformation are dialectically constructed and enacted. The observed network of interfaith organizations is placed in a Durkheimian framework as a moral community with distinct rituals and sacred objects, referred to as the “interfaith society.” The research is based chiefly upon interviews with 52 participants of dialogue in Rome, participant-observation of interfaith practices, and interviews with 17 Romans who do not practice dialogue. Interfaith encounters and interviews with 25 dialoguers in Israel and Palestine illustrate the difference geographical and sociopolitical context can make in the practice of dialogue, and demonstrate that dialogue is framed in both settings as a method to disrupt historical patterns of stereotyping and objectification. This research may be summarized in the following video (https://vimeopro.com/jennlindsay/portfolio/video/260225599), followed by a discussion of the contributions of the study to methodological questions about empirical research on interreligious dialogue. This study finds that interfaith dialogue cannot be understood by looking for "metrics," but rather by examining its processes and asking what they mean for participants, as dialogue exists on a meanings-relationship axis rather than on a cumulative axis that accounts for productivity and achievement; indeed, the study finds that, as one interviewee said, “the product of dialogue is the dialogue.” Dialogues are found to be best understood not by measurement of their "success," but as shared sacred values that bind together the interfaith society. The repeated, communal invocation of these sacred values signifies to the members of the community that they belong to the collective, solidifying also awareness of who is not in their group.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Edin Abumanssur
Field #3.
Field #4. Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo
Field #5.
Field #6. Migration and missions in the Protestantism in Brazil
Field #7. The configuration of Protestantism in Brazil, still today, is related to the migratory movements of the XIX century as well as to the action of the missionary societies and churches in processes of Europe and the United States expansion. Although they are distinct movements and processes, the present Protestant presence in Brazil is linked both to the migratory policy promoted by the Brazilian government aiming at the substitution of slave labor, the occupation of territories and the whitening of the population as well as the interest of European and American churches and their missionary societies in the expansion of their presences in the world. In Brazil, the Protestant churches are classified based on their origin in the interests of the government to import of a specific type of workers or in the interest of the religious motivations of the missionary societies. “Protestantism of mission” or “Protestantism of migration” developed specific ethos, proper of universal or ethnic religions. We want to point out this relationship between migration and religion as something that has marked Brazilian Protestantism since its origin and which is still a distinctive element among the national churches.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 1
Field #2. Alireza Doostdar
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Chicago
Field #5.
Field #6. Practice, Islam, and the Anthropology of Tradition
Field #7. This paper extends and deepens anthropological debates over “tradition” in the study of Islam to make a case for a sharper delineation of “practice,” an important concept in social science that has lost some of its analytic power to overuse. It does so by considering several ethnographic examples in which Iranians participate in, but do not practice, the Islamic tradition of occult sciences. The paper draws on Alasdair MacIntyre’s conceptualization of practice and its relationship to tradition, and particularly his distinction between internal and external goods in the exercise of any practice. It argues that anthropologists of Islamic tradition have mostly confined themselves to studying practices in which the internal goods are paramount and pious practitioners strive toward achieving coherence. Accounting for the multiplicity of goals toward which practices are directed and the tensions that may arise among them can allow a more complex grasp of social activity and the ways in which actors may fail to achieve “practice,” instead relating themselves to tradition through “participation.” This framework also opens possibilities for noticing some of the ways in which new practices come into being.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Suzana Ramos Coutinho
Field #3.
Field #4. Pontific Catholic University
Field #5.
Field #6. Haitians on the move: photography and religion shaping the imaginary of migration
Field #7. This article aims to discuss the different aspects of the religiosity of Haitian immigrants who arrives in Brazil. The background of the current situation of these immigrants (and how the government is creating / changing / adapting new public politics in order to attend the basic needs of the newly arrived individuals) help us to discuss the transition and negotiation of this native religiosity to a particular model of religiosity, which accommodate different elements belonging to the Brazilian religious scene and that help to create a specific perception of immigrant imaginary and identity. Based on this reality, we seek to bring light - through the use of different methods - to also think about strategies for data collection and analysis to provide a more accurate contribution to the understanding of the group in question.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Hengameh Ashraf- Emami
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Nottingham
Field #5.
Field #6. Dynamics agency of British Muslim Women through education
Field #7. This paper aims to explore multi-dimensional aspects of agency of British Muslim women in intergenerational context in two cities of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Glasgow. Drawing on forty life history interviews of participants across generations, the ethnographic research attempts to shed lights on complexity of Muslim women’s identities in public arena, such as education. To achieve the aims of the research, this article applies double consciousness framework (Du Bois, W.E.B., 1897), in conjunction with intersectionality (Crenshaw and McCall, 2013.) in order to demonstrate and explore various agency of the participants. Through empirical research it is evident that intersection of gender, ethnicity, religion and class plays a significant role in constructing, deconstructing and reconstructing of participants’ identities in post secular and multi-cultural society such as Britain. It is important to comprehend how Muslim women negotiate their identities through social spaces such as education and how they use education as a tool for empowering themselves. While agency sometimes was considered either resistant (e.g. Butler, 2013) or argued as docile agency (see Mahmood, 2011), this article discusses various forms and practices of Muslim women agency when they engage with educational system, whereas they have various experiences and social backgrounds.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Ana Raluca Bigu
Field #3.
Field #4. Center for Institutional Analysis and Development Eleutheria (CADI)
Field #5.
Field #6. When Religious Actors Set Up The Political Agenda: Romania's Family Referendum And The Rise Of A New Conservative Christian Force
Field #7. A highly controversial referendum in Romania on whether the constitutional definition of family should be narrowed to that of a union between a man and a woman - echoing similar referendums organised in Slovakia and Croatia on this matter - failed to attract the 30% threshold required for its validation. As the campaigns for and against the referendum highly polarized the Romanian society and political life, the result was widely considered an epic fail for the Coalition for Family (CfF), the church-backed umbrella group that initiated the push to alter the Constitution, with the financial support and logistics of several denominations (most notably the Evangelical and the Orthodox ones). While the result might be disappointing for the CfF’s ambitions to set Romania’s political agenda, the Coalition is nevertheless now repositioning itself - my paper argues - as a prospective Christian party, both trying to attract the religious older Romanian electorate, and to better integrate – as I will also show - along the lines of the Christian conservative World Congress of Families, a US-based coalition with plans to play an important political and social role in countries like Slovakia, Croatia, and Moldova. This claim is supported by an ongoing research of the Coalition of Family’ discourse, before and after the referendum, using an in-depth content-based analysis of its public declarations, press releases and social media posts, but also of the discourse of similar organizations in the Central European region (“Alliance for Family” in Slovakia and “On Behalf of the Family” in Croatia).
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Patria Gwen Borcena
Field #3.
Field #4. Greenresearch Environmental Research Group, Inc.
Field #5.
Field #6. The Catholic Church in the Public Square: Defending the Right to Life Amidst the Philippine President’s War on Drugs
Field #7. This research critically examines the Catholic Church’s responses to a contemporary societal problem plaguing the Philippines which has even attracted the attention of foreign media and worried some nations and international organizations. This “war on drugs” is a dominant discourse dictated by the Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. His use of the word “war” set the stage for a violent approach in addressing the drug menace. It has become in Jacques Derrida’s language, a “theatre of cruelty.” The underlying script for the “war on drugs” has been written and directed by the Philippine President himself and acted by certain units in the government bureaucracy. The initial lack of strong public outcry about many extra-judicial killings (EJKs) prompted then head of Catholic bishops to state in his pastoral letter: “If we consent or allow the killing of suspected drug addicts, we shall also be responsible for their deaths.” Amidst this context, the “decentering” and “deconstruction” processes emerged as the church engaged in creative “unconventional resistance” geared to shape public opinion in terms of ethical choices and universal values, such as the sacredness of life and inherent dignity of the human person. This paper identified the church’s different modes of responses and range of interventions under the Duterte regime. This sociological study includes an assessment of the church‘s strides and limitations, as well as external factors affecting their promotion of human rights and attainment of justice for many EJKs. Research methods include textual analysis, interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation, and visual sociology.
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Field #1. Contemporary Religiosities and Sociological Diagnoses in the West
Field #2. Laeticia Stauffer
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute for Social Sciences of Religions - University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Field #5.
Field #6. Significations émiques de la "spiritualité" et parcours de vie : l'exemple de pratiquant.e.s de yoga en Suisse romande comme acteurs "pluriels"
Field #7. Le « yoga postural moderne » fait partie des offres qui allient spiritualité, thérapies et bien-être et qui contribuent à réorganiser le marché des « biens de salut » et redéfinir les représentations profanes et scientifiques de la « santé » - centrée sur la responsabilisation individuelle. Bien que les formes de religiosité des pratiquant.e.s de yoga soient diverses, elles ont comme point commun d’accorder une primauté à l’expérience subjective (Heelas et Woodhead), avec un discours collectivement partagé valorisant le yoga comme outil d’émancipation et d’authenticité, marqué par la singularité (Martuccelli). Pourtant, ce monde du yoga est traversé de part en part également par des normes sociales et un renforcement du contrôle sur les corps. Dans cette communication, nous montrerons que les « réseaux de significations » émiques de la ‘santé’ et la ‘spiritualité’ des pratiquant.e.s de yoga - où s’entrecroisent différents types de savoirs et valeurs – sont multiples, et que les trajectoires de yoga ne sont pas homogènes. Nous mettrons alors en évidence en quoi les contextes de cours et les parcours de vie des pratiquant.e.s donnent formes à ces significations de la « spiritualité », leur appropriation et leur expression et en quoi un éclairage en termes d’ « acteurs pluriels » multisocialisés et multidéterminés (Lahire) permet d’en rendre compte. Nous nous appuierons sur les résultats d’une recherche de doctorat en cours en sociologie menée en Suisse romande et à l’étranger (démarche multi-site), basés sur des données comprenant de l’observation participante, la réalisation d’entretiens et d’autres méthodes complémentaires.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. olivia legrip
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Lyon
Field #5.
Field #6. Mon Père ou Mompera ? Figures et appartenances des prêtres entre le diocèse et le catholicisme malgache de Lyon
Field #7. Cette communication sera l’occasion d’exposer une recherche en cours auprès des membres du clergé (prêtres, religieux, religieuses) malgaches rattachés de manière temporaire ou pérenne au diocèse de Lyon. Leur trajectoire de migrants religieux, souvent néanmoins étudiants, passent par un chemin administratif et politique complexe. Une fois affiliés au diocèse de Lyon, les membres du clergé malgache nouent des liens avec des Catholiques et officient dans une paroisse suivant une pratique du catholicisme éloigné du catholicisme de Madagascar. Cependant, si leur paroisse impose une adaptation de leur pratique dans une altérité religieuse, ils participent (alors comme simple auditeurs) à la messe en langue malgache mensuelle autorisée par l’institution catholique lyonnaise. Ce retour au catholicisme malgache est recherché par les Religieux, tout comme les Catholiques malgaches recherchent ces prêtres pour des demandes de rituels qu’ils n’envisagent pas de confier au curé « français » de leur paroisse. Ainsi, comment les membres du clergé malgache de Lyon combinent-ils un emploi du temps religieux et un catholicisme à la fois complexes, plurilocalisés et aux pratiques plurielles ? Pourquoi les Catholiques malgaches se (dé)tournent-ils vers (d’)un prêtre ou en sollicitent-ils un autre suivant le rituel à pratiquer ? Comment les catholicismes malgache et français sont-ils perçus ou invisibilisés, complémentaires ou opposés ?
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. The Social Construction of Reality and the sociology of religion
Field #2. Kirill Markin
Field #3.
Field #4. St.Tikhon's Orthodox University
Field #5.
Field #6. Sociology of religion as a part of the sociology of knowledge in the works of Thomas Luckmann
Field #7. In the "Invisible Religion" by Thomas Luckmann we find three basic definitions of “religious”: anthropological, individualistic, and social. While the idea of the individual and the social dimension is not new, the introduction of the anthropological component entails certain difficulties. Luckmann writes that the special anthropological condition of religion is the transcending of a biological organism into the world of “others”, into the world of values and meanings, where the organism realizes as “self”. This process he calls fundamentally religious. This thesis, on the one hand, recognizes the need for a social one, on the other hand, implies certain “prepersonal” religiosity, since the process of the “self” formation is temporal. As a result, the human organism is inevitably predisposed to religiosity, which obviously weakens the “scientific nature” of Luckmann’s concept. Another consequence is the opposition to the Durkheimian tradition. This looks especially strange when Luckmann describes the social dimension of the religious as an objective total worldview, providing social meaning for the existence of society. This definition strongly resembles the position of Durkheim. My thesis is that adequate understanding of the "Invisible Religion" is possible only in the context of the epistemological model proposed in the "Social Construction of Reality". The paper discusses three points where these works complement each other: at the moment of emergence, during functioning and at the point of destruction of the symbolic universes. Within the framework of this analysis, the need for anthropological measurement and the function it performs in the Luckmann’s model becomes clear.
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Field #1. Religion and Bioethics
Field #2. Elham Mireshghi
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Chicago
Field #5.
Field #6. Transplant Deals: Shi‘i Legal Reasons and Everyday Ethical Perspectives in Iran
Field #7. In Iran, paying strangers to donate a healthy kidney is a common occurrence. This is not because of a feckless medical infrastructure or the lax implementation of laws. In fact it is because of a centrally administered program actively regulating the exchange since the late 1990s that many aspiring middle class men and women consider donating a kidney to overcome a bout of financial hardship. Moreover, the program is sanctioned by fatwas by prominent Shi‘i Muslim jurists allowing what is commonly referred to as the “buying and selling” of kidneys. Within the field of bioethics the overwhelming attitude towards the financial incentivizing of kidney donation is critical and condemnatory. This stems from concerns about “organ-trafficking” and bodily “commodification,” the coercive conditions of poverty, and the inequitable transferal of body parts from the indigent to the affluent. It is also widely assumed that the inviolability of the body is a universal cultural and religious fact that is frayed by modern biotechnologies that test the limits of ethics and personhood. These assertions are largely based on philosophical abstractions or ethnographic data from contexts where kidney sales are illicit and mostly ill-fated. Where the regulated Iranian model is considered, the evidence is superficial and anecdotal at best. Based on 18 months of ethnographic research in Tehran and Qom, this paper challenges widespread bioethical assumptions by analyzing both the Shi‘i jurists' fatwas and the uncertain moral terrain that animates the decisions of Muslim paid kidney donors and their recipients.
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Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Nina Björkman
Field #3. Nina Björkman
Field #4. Åbo Akademi
Field #5.
Field #6. Decolonial turned occidentalist?
Field #7. The PhD dissertation I am currently working on focuses on three Islamic fundamentalist movements, namely the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizb ut-Tahrir and Tablighi Jamaat, and how they express views on the need to further decolonialize the Muslim world and return to a “pure” Islam. The main focus of my research is on the ways in which they spread their message. These movements are of particular interest in European context, since they have a continuously growing presence on the continent. Although the movements largely refer to the same verses in the Quran as justifications for their position, they have had very different trajectories throughout their development. I am interested in exploring those and seeing how the movements’ backgrounds and the settings where they are active influence how they work to spread their message, and in what way they have had to make concessions to the surrounding societies in order to guarantee their own survival. The three movements in question are of very different character, which, granted, leads to significant challenges in the analysis. However, since they are such highly influential movements, I find it necessary to re-examine the ways in which they have been studied, particularly from a security studies point of view. This presentation offers a brief summary of the analysis in my thesis.
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Field #1. Religious authority, political participation, and the Internet
Field #2. Santhosh R
Field #3.
Field #4. IIT Madras, India
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious cyber sphere and internet activism: The tory of a ‘traditionalist’ Muslim organization in Kerala, South India
Field #7. This paper looks at the foray of a highly influential traditionalist Muslim religious organization into the cybersphere and the resultant dynamics in the state of Kerala, south India. This organization, representing the vast majority of traditionalist Sunnis was dubbed as ‘obscurantist’, ‘regressive’ and ‘orthodox’ by the rival reformist organizations who articulated Islamic modernist arguments in Kerala. However, even while keeping this traditionalist tag intact, this organization has reinvented themselves and has undergone tremendous transformation by making use of the avenues offered by a neoliberal economy and transnational connections, especially with the Gulf countries. One of the most active spheres of their activity is the cyberspace where the organisation has a very vibrant presence in terms of the official website, live streaming facilities, active social media presence and a host of other facilities. This paper, based on the data collected for an on-going research project examines how the active cyber presence and social media activism provide renewed visibility and rigour to the organization in terms of reaching wider population including a substantial section of migrant Muslims in Gulf countries. At the same time, this also poses significant challenges to the process of maintaining a unified authority structure, dealing with criticisms and trolls, increased democratization and access to religious and spiritual resources. Based on interviews with the cyber activists of the organization and data obtained through internet ethnography, the paper offers insights into the transformations as well as emerging challenges to the authority structure of this traditionalist organization.
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Field #1. Liberation Christianity in Latin America. Politics, Religion and Spirituality in the Global South
Field #2. RONALDO CALVALCANTE
Field #3.
Field #4. FACULDADE UNIDA
Field #5.
Field #6. A TEOLOGIA PROTESTANTE DE RUBEM ALVES COMO PROTO-HISTÓRIA DA TEOLOGIA DA LIBERTAÇÃO
Field #7. Precisamente neste ano de 2019, celebra-se o jubileu da publicação da obra A Theology of Human Hope de Rubem Alves (1933-2014), fruto de uma tese de doutoramento defendida no ano anterior por ele no Princeton Theological Seminary. Seu título original era Towards a Theology of Liberation, que foi mudado por questões editoriais. Pouco conhecido, entretanto, foi seu primeiro trabalho acadêmico – dissertação de mestrado defendida em 1964 no Union Theological Seminary (New York) – A Theological Interpretation of the Meaning of the revolution in Brazil. Em seguida, Alves volta ao Brasil como pastor da Igreja Presbiteriana na cidade de Lavras-MG. A Teologia da Libertação (TdL) é, na verdade, o produto mais relevante do cristianismo latino-americano a partir do final da década de 1960. Ela sintetizou, junto à atmosfera de renovação criada pelo Vaticano II, os esforços acadêmicos e pastorais de uma série de personalidades, ministérios e movimentos católicos que desde os anos 1950 vinham interpretando o Evangelho em termos de um compromisso social da igreja. O protestantismo apregoado por Richard Shaull, Rubem Alves, Julio de Santa Ana, Jether Ramalho, João Dias de Araújo, George Pixley, José M. Bonino, Waldo César, e tantos outros na América Latina desempenhou notável papel crítico ao reler as Escrituras e a história sob novos olhares. O caudal de ideias, especialmente no Protestantismo brasileiro era veiculado, entre outros, no movimento ISAL – Igreja e Sociedade na América Latina. Decerta maneira, Rubem Alves, amalgamou todo esse universo novo na teologia protestante, influenciado diretamente por Shaull, foi o primeiro a se utilizar das expressões “revolução” e “libertação” em contexto religioso, alterando permanentemente a vocação da teologia no Brasil.
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Helena Vilaça
Field #3. Helena Vilaça
Field #4. University of Porto
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious Trends and Paradoxes in Portuguese Public Space
Field #7. Portugal is a country with a solid Catholic majority and, according to recent surveys (Pew, 2018), probably presenting the highest religiosity indicators in Western Europe, somehow suggesting a certain exceptionality in the European context. Many of the national memories remain grounded on Catholic material symbologies and Catholic institutions are substantial in various sectors of social life, education, health, social solidarity and the media. Actually, it is remarkable the presence of Catholic protagonists in the most traditional media spaces and in culture. On the other hand, Fatima is one of the greatest examples of popular pilgrimage, nationally and internationally, something to be understood as an indicator of reinforcement of religion in the Portuguese public space and a place of encounter with other societal domains, namely the political one. This is a revealing fact that the separation between State and Church is more ambiguous than expected (Casanova, 1994), as well as the regulation of the religious system. Along with the Catholic presence, some religious minorities are growing and searching public recognition. However, the public role of religion coexists with processes of privatization and individualization of religious choices. A study conducted in the Metropolitan Area of Lisbon (Teixeira et al., 2018) reveals that in less than one decade, the number of individuals without religious affiliation increased significantly and among these, the "believers without religion" doubled. Conversation about religious issues is circumscribed to family and friends contexts, doctrinal belief issues are ignored, and the normative dimensions of the religious autonomized.
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Elena Stepanova
Field #3.
Field #4. Ural Federal University
Field #5.
Field #6. Russian Orthodox versus Liberal Views on Morality
Field #7. The idea of an indissoluble link between traditional religion and morality is strongly supported by both Russian Orthodox Church and the Russian political powers, which tend to delegate the responsibility for moral improvement of Russian people to religious institutions. As a result, in recent decades, the religiosity and moral traditionalism’s alliance has substantially increased. Thus, religion in Russia now became a direct, unhampered source of morality.It would be a gross exaggeration to say that in today’s Russia religion defines the popular ethos; however, unquestionably it is a significant factor not only for those who regularly practice and observe religion, but it is also an important reference point for a massive part of the non-religious population. Nevertheless, there is an opposite understanding of the nature of moral values, characterized as liberal one, which regards morality as a product of personal autonomy and as a positive factor of social development. On the contrary, according to the Orthodox point of view, absolutizing freedom of choice destroys morality, turning it into an arbitrariness. In this contradiction, the natural discrepancy between secular and religious notions of morality is clearly manifested: if the former by their nature admit moral pluralism as a consequence of personal autonomy, the latter proceed from the absolutization of their own system of values, which requires collective adherence. The problem arises when a religious point of view claims to be an absolute truth in a secular society. In this case, the religious institution appropriates power functions and monopolizes the right to determine what is morally good, and what is not. Thus, the traditional values of a particular religion become an ideology imposed from above and does not require people to do anything but to agree with their authority.
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Field #1. Intra-faith solidarity movements in a transnational world
Field #2. Frédéric Strack
Field #3.
Field #4. PANTHÉON-ASSAS/EPHE
Field #5.
Field #6. Beyond the State: The Lubavitch solidarity
Field #7. Frédéric Strack Contractual PhD Student at CECP and GSRL Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas/École Pratique des Hautes Études Key Words: glocalism – intra-faith solidarity – Judaism – messianism – religious integralism – transnationalization Beyond the State: The Lubavitch solidarity This paper aims at showing how the religious solidarity of the Lubavitch movement exemplifies one form of religious “glocalism”. Lubavitch movement is an international faith-based NGO which contributes to spread and harmonize an integral praxis of Judaism. It does so in 90 countries, along a local-global continuum which bypasses the state level. Locally, the Lubavitch emissaries (schluchim) are sent to areas with scarce Jewish religiosity to bring the equipment and the knowledge required for a literal praxis of Judaism. Globally, within this spreading and harmonization process of the religious praxis, the Lubavitch movement breaks free from the national frame and develop an international Lubavitch identity against syncretic or national forms of praxis. This dynamic matches with the messianic perspective of this movement: having the Messiah come quicker through an intense praxis of each and every Jew. How does this marginalization process work? Through which expressions? These actions have an impact on the praxis. The local action strengthens the praxis of many Jews within a phenomenon of internal conversion. The global action quickly internationalizes the Lubavitch life as they develop a strong transnational mobility and a globalized praxis of Judaism. What are the operational modalities of such an evolution of the praxis of Judaism? This paper is based on the results of an ongoing PhD investigation about the Jewish orthodoxy. It resorts to around 40 interviews with orthodox Jews and observation of Lubavitch ceremonies and living quarters and analysis of the publications of the movement. Works cited: BELCOVE-SHALIN Janet (1995) New world Hasidim: ethnographic studies of Hasidic Jews in America BERMAN Elise (2009) “Voices of Outreach: The Construction of Identity and Maintenance of Social Ties Among Chabad-Lubavitch Emissaries”, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion March, p69-85 DAVIDMAN Lynn, GREIL Arthur (1993) Gender and the Experience of Conversion: The Case of "Returnees" to Modern Orthodox Judaism DANZGER Muray (1989) Returning to tradition: the contemporary revival of Orthodox Judaism DEIN Simon (1999) “Lubavitch: A contemporary messianic movement”, Journal of Contemporary Religion, May, p191-204 FINKELMAN Yoel (2011) “Ultra-Orthodox/Haredi Education”, International Handbook of Jewish Education, p1063-1080 HEILMAN Samuel (1992) Defenders of the faith: inside ultra-Orthodox Jewry MINTZ, Jerome (1992) Hasidic people: a place in the new world PODSELVER Laurence (2002) « La Techouva. Nouvelle orthodoxie juive et conversion interne », p275-296 PODSELVER Laurence (2010) Retour au judaïsme ? Les loubavitch en France ROBERTSON Roland (1995) “Glocalisation: Time-Space and Homogeneity-Heterogeneity” in FEATHERSTONE Mike, LASH Scott, ROBERSTON Roland, Global Modernities
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Field #1. Politics and economics of monasticism
Field #2. Barbora Spalová
Field #3. Helena Jurašková
Field #4. Faculty of social sciences Charles university Prague
Field #5.
Field #6. The moral economies of Czech monasteries
Field #7. The process of the state-church separation started in 2013 in Czech republic with the implementation of the law on restitution of the church properties. The main topic is to analyse the moral economies of Czech monasteries negotiated during this process. The continuity of lived monasticism in the Czech Republic was interrupted by the communist regime which put consecrated life to the illegality and caused the discontinuity in the lives of the monastic communities and in the use of monastic buildings. Now monastic properties were returned and the communities try to find their reinterpretation of the monastic tradition and of the tradition of the place in order to give the meaning to their presence in the locality. We focus on societal negotiations of this meaning within newly established monastic economies and we interpret these negotiations as a part of moral economies, drawing from the expanded conceptualisation of this term done by Didier Fassin. We established four „regions of contact“ between the monasteries and „the world“: monastery as cultural heritage, monastic economy and stewardship, sustainability and spiritual life. Within these regions, we describe how the exchanges of material and immaterial goods, values, norms and emotions builds a new moral pact between the monasteries and their different counterparts. We argue that the perception of monasteries is shifting from something belonging to the past to the role of active and important actors in local and global societies.
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Field #1. Contemporary Religiosities and Sociological Diagnoses in the West
Field #2. Silke Steets
Field #3.
Field #4. Leipzig University
Field #5.
Field #6. God as a Personal Friend: Do Evangelicals Form Resonant Self-World Relations?
Field #7. In 2016, German sociologist Hartmut Rosa introduced his concept of 'resonance' as a way of relating to the world that opens up an alternative to the accelerated mode of existence inherent in capitalist modernity. Using Rosa's theory of resonance as a background, I will, firstly, show how Evangelical Protestants manage to see God as a personal friend and, secondly, ask whether they form resonant self-world relations. Balancing the pros and cons, I will conclude by discussing the social position of Evangelicals in modern western societies. The paper draws on biographical-narrative interviews conducted for an ongoing research project called "The Structure of Cognitive Minorities: Evangelicals in Leipzig and Unitarians in Dallas". The objective of this project is to ascertain - by means of a comparative analysis of cognitive minorities - how people maintain a view of the world that deviates significantly from the one generally taken for granted in their social environment. In this project I aim to reconstruct how a distinctive group of religious believers (Evangelical Protestants) in a strongly secular city (Leipzig) defines its reality and how this is done by a group of skeptics and seekers (Unitarians) in a city characterized by evangelical spirituality (Dallas). The paper, however, will focus on the Leipzig part.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Karina Felitti
Field #3.
Field #4. National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET); University of Buenos Aires
Field #5.
Field #6. "The spiritual is political": feminisms and women’s spiritualties in contemporary Argentina
Field #7. In 2018, during congressional debates on the legalization of abortion, many churches and religious movements rejected the project and with their reaction reinforced the campaign for the “Estado Laico” and Collective Apostasy. But there were also legislators who identified themselves as religious and voted in favor of the legalization, and catholic and spiritual feminists who showed their green scarves -symbol of the campaign for legal abortion- in women´s demonstrations and in their own rituals as religious practitioners. This paper analyzes the interactions between the movement of female spirituality centered on women's circles and hegemonic feminist movement in contemporary Argentina. Following Joan Scott´s recent work, my study challenge the idea of secularism as synonym of women´s advance and distinguish secularism from “laicidad” in the context of a Latin American country. It is structured around 4 issues: empowerment through bodily self-knowledge and self-consciousness; the value of female legacies and the inheritance of "witches"; sorority as a tools of personal/social transformation; the revision of the notion of nature and the sacred. The analysis is based on ethnographic observations in women's circles and other spaces of feminine spirituality, feminist encounters and mobilizations; semi-structured interviews with participants and the information they socialize in their social networks. The main objective is to account for the negotiation of senses about the political and the spiritual, and the circulations of practices and values between feminist activists and spiritual practitioners, and the coexistence of both identities and definitions.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Peter B. Andersen
Field #3. Peter Gundelach
Field #4. Univesity of Copenhagen
Field #5.
Field #6. The Complexity Approach to the Development of Religiosity
Field #7. Over the years, a number of studies have addressed the changes in religious values and activities in order to find support for different theoretical approaches to the study of religiosity, particularly secularisation, privatization or individualisation. However, empirical evidence has shown that none of these approaches offers comprehensive and consistent patterns of interpretation of the development. This has led Furseth and other scholars to term the picture as “complex”. The present paper offers an individual level analysis of religious change based on the methodological and theoretical approach of the complexity frame of reference. Based on the Danish part of the World Value Survey 1981-2017, we investigate the relations between individual religious belief and other social values. A cluster analysis identifies a number of clusters of people whose religious attitudes are relatively similar. The clusters are shown to correlate with moral and family values, but they have only low of correlations to values regarding the distribution of wealth and other general political values.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham
Field #3. Sonya Sharma
Field #4. Trinity Western University
Field #5.
Field #6. Re-conceptualizing human rights and religion: The case of albinism in Africa
Field #7. The case of albinism, the genetic condition that results in a lack of skin pigment and loss of vision, serves as a stage on which to examine the analytic capacity of human rights and religions, which is the focus of this paper. In the last decade, the need for human rights research and activism has escalated with attacks against persons with albinism, such that the United Nations in 2015 appointed an Independent Expert on the Enjoyment of Human Rights by Persons with Albinism. This rise in violence has also challenged traditional understandings of both human rights and religions. As Ibhawoh (2018) explains, universal human rights have intrinsically local dimensions since they gain meaning when applied to local contexts. When international human rights are deemed as Western/Northern, imposed on local situations such as violence against albinism, the instruments may be disregarded, as colonial laws may exist on the books but have little day-to-day enactment. Understanding how persons with albinism are constructed as different or Other requires relates to African ontologies (Imafidon, 2017), and likewise, untangling the imbrication of witchcraft in attacks on persons with albinism requires situating it within the broader landscape of African Traditional Religion and high levels of religiosity in what has been described as the “enchanted continent”. Indeed, Cohan (2011) argues that human rights in the case for albinism must account “religion as fulcrum”. Here again, traditional Western/Northern constructions of religion as institutionalized and creedal provide only partial explanation for the complex expressions of belief. Cohan, J. A. (2011). Problem of witchcraft violence in Africa. The Suffolk University Law Review, 44(4), 803-872. Ibhawoh, B. (2018). Human rights in Africa: New approaches to African history. Cambridge University Press. Imafidon, E. (2017). Dealing with the other between the ethical and the moral: albinism on the African continent. Theoretical medicine and bioethics, 38(2), 163-177.
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Field #1. Religion and the Contemporary Right
Field #2. Georgeta Nazarska
Field #3.
Field #4. SULSIT
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion, Human Rights and Traditional Values: the “Bulgarian case” in Contemporary Debate
Field #7. The object of the paper is the normative and social frameworks of religious pluralism in present day Bulgaria and its subject - the balance between secular and religious and the state – church relations. The study focuses on the process of creeping secularization of the “social field” (Bourdieu), which has been observed in the last 10 years in the country, and which gradually removes the fundamental individual and collective civil freedoms and human rights (of private property, of speech, thought, conscience and religion, of sexual orientation and gender identity, of sexual and reproduction). The culmination of this debate was in 2018, which began with a public and political scandal over the ratification of the Istanbul Convention and ended with the vote on a new Denominations Act, largely returning the totalitarian normative and institutional framework and taking away much of the freedom of religion. The debate in 2018 was preceded by opposition to issues such as: legalization of cohabitation and same-sex marriages, LGBT reconciliation, organ donation and transplantation, surrogate motherhood and in vitro technologies, euthanasia and freezing of stem cells, etc. In the past year, the debate has been put into the discourse of “preserving” or “losing” “traditional values”, and hence of the social foundations and national identity. By "traditional values," religious communities mean religious ethics, but political and public actors - the patriarchal values of the non-industrial (pre-Modern) society. The debate mobilized and united all religious subjects, populist, center-left and centrist parties, NGOs, academics, Masonic and Para masonic structures, and other groups. Unlike the Central and Western Europe, the so-called “defense alliance” has an extreme left-wing orientation and is associated with racist, xenophobic, anti-Semitic, anti-Roma, anti-Islamic, anti-Turkish, anti-Western, anti-liberal, anti-globalization, pseudo-Christian, ultra-nationalist ideas. The consolidation of this alliance coincides with the emergence of the traditionalist wave in the US and the Central Europe, with the rise of the terrorist threats, the emergence of massive political immigration from the Near East, the new Eurasian Russian politics, and domestically, with the high level of Islamophobia, homophobia, lack of religious tolerance, and strong internal economic and value crisis. In the paper, on the basis of documentary and textual analysis of basic normative and political documents, through interviews with political and religious leaders, and through surveys, will be traced the attack against religious rights in Bulgaria at different levels: central and local authorities (three of the left-wing parties entered the government in 2017); legislative, executive and judiciary; international and EU institutions. The "Bulgarian case" will be compared with those in Central Europe.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. ELISABETH DIAMANTOPOULOU
Field #3.
Field #4. Catholic University of Louvain
Field #5.
Field #6. Orthodox Christianity and Human Rights in Europe: The Paradigm of Freedom of Religion in the ECtHR Case Law
Field #7. This paper aims at examining the implementation of Human rights in Orthodox majority European countries (Greece, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Russia) via the paradigm of Freedom of Religion through the case law of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in Strasbourg. We will examine some key-cases pertaining to violations of Freedom of Religion (with a special focus on Greece). Freedom of Religion, as a fundamental Human right, guaranteed by the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR), constitutes a key-issue that contributes to broadening the reflections on the overall Human rights-related problematic between East and West, by shading light to the more complex issue regarding the conceptualization and implementation of Human Rights in countries belonging to the Eastern Orthodox tradition.
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Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. NAILE BRAFFO CONDE
Field #3.
Field #4. UNIVERSIDADE METODISTA DE SÃO PAULO
Field #5.
Field #6. SOCIAL CHANGE AND TRANSNATIONAL PROCESSES OF THE CUBAN SANTERÍA
Field #7. The abrupt social changes initiated in Cuba in the 90s of the last century, including reforms to face the crisis - known as the Special Period - opened the doors to the circulation of information flows, markets, ideas, cultures and thoughts until then not existing in the country. With the passage of time and the current process of “Updating the Cuban economic and social model” that is lived on the Island; and as a result of this, the increase in tourism, the highest level of contact of the population with the exterior, the search for economic alternatives outside the borders, the highest interest from abroad in the exchange with the country, and the increase of interrelationships with other nations, it has contributed to the popularization of religious traditions of African origin and with this to the strengthening of transnational networks by practitioners of Santeria - religious system of African origin more widespread in the country. Santería arrived in the 40s to Mexico, Puerto Rico and the United States, and from 1990 to all the countries of South America and the Caribbean, as well as to Europe, especially Spain, where independent religious groups of Cuba have been established. The purpose of this proposal is to analyze how the social changes in cuban society, from 1990 to the present, have influenced the geographical and numerical expansion of Santería, as well as in the variations of religious practices, links and values.
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Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Graham Hill
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Bern Sociology Institute
Field #5.
Field #6. Between Church and State: Freemasonry and the Everyday Negotiation of the Religious-Secular Binary
Field #7. Religion and secularism have an ambivalent conceptual relationship. In principle they often operate as two parts of a binary opposition, concepts that find some of their meaning in contrast with each other, the presence of one indicating the absence of the other. In practice, however, lines between the religious and the secular are never easily drawn; the meaning of the two concepts are intertwined in their practical logic, their historical origins and their contemporary configurations. This paper traces the origins of secularism back to the wars of religion in the European-medieval-Christian world and argues that Freemasonry is an ideal typical organizational representative of primordial European religious-secular mixtures. Drawing on ethnographic analysis I then examine contemporary Masonic practice, and show how Freemasons pursue esoteric secrecy to continue negotiating the intertwined opposition of religion and secularism. By way of conclusion I consider the implications that contemporary mixtures of religiosity and secularism have for what Habermas calls "post-secular" societies – societies that seek to open their public spheres to religious commitments and convictions while promoting the universal character of the discussion that animates the public sphere.
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Field #1. The State and spiritual/religious healing processes in contemporary societies
Field #2. Carla Murgia
Field #3. Carla Murgia
Field #4. Nursing Science Department of Biomedicine and Prevention University of Rome "Tor Vergata" Via Montpellier, 1 - 00133 Rome, Italy
Field #5.
Field #6. Conceptual analysis of spirituality
Field #7. Purpose: To explore the concept of spirituality in nursing. Background: Spirituality is known to be an integral part of holistic care for the person. It is important to find out its meaning in health care derived from the religious pluralism of our society, from intertwining beliefs, cultures, traditions and other religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism or Islamism. Design: "Spirituality" has been explored using the evolutionary and inductive method of Rodgers' analysis (1989, 2000). Data source: The analysis settings are 71 articles published in English, from 2008 to 2018, in international electronic databases, Pubmed / Medline, CINAHAL Plus, PsycoInfo, ScIELO, three dictionaries, two books, one e-book. Review methods: The data were analyzed by looking carefully at the attributes, the antecedents, consequences, terms related to spirituality in nursing and non-nursing literature. Results: The analysis of the concept showed a range of characteristics of spirituality, influenced by factors that thus return a dynamic process of the human being in relation to religious pluralism, beliefs, traditions and values ​​of the complex and multiethnic society, providing a definition of spirituality. And a model case showed the real need to also understand the religious aspect. Conclusion: Nursing philosophy that embraces the holistic vision of the person, human being constituted by a physical, psychic, spiritual and social unity, requires that today's nurses learn the appropriate skills and knowledge of the different philosophical-religious approaches to enable them to provide assistance in all fields, including spiritual.
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Field #1. Towards an empirical analysis of interreligious dialogue
Field #2. Lena De Botton
Field #3. Roger Campdepadros
Field #4. University of Barcelona
Field #5.
Field #6. Interreligious dialogue for the prevention of religious radicalization
Field #7. Faced with the current challenges of reducing the conflict between cultural and religious groups, the risk of loss of sense of adolescence and youth that makes them vulnerable to recruitment in violent and extremist networks requires the involvement of the entire community for prevent radicalization processes. Scientific results that are having a social impact highlight on two key aspects for the prevention of radicalization (Includ-ed, Proton and Laicity). First, the creation of contexts and conditions that favor interactions based on egalitarian dialogue, and especially in this proposal, egalitarian interreligious dialogue, helps to deactivate prejudice as well as create friendship ties. Second, pick up the voice of the vulnerable groups that have traditionally been silenced.
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Field #1. Exporting faith: Migration and religion across countries
Field #2. Malwina Krajewska
Field #3.
Field #4. Nicolaus Copernicus University
Field #5.
Field #6. Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries in exile as an example of institutional migration
Field #7. Tibetan monasteries in exile play an important role in lives of many Buddhist immigrants who settled down in India or Nepal. They integrate, educate and try to preserve an old monastic tradition under rapid social, cultural and economic changes in abroad countries. Paper introduces the results of a five-year study on Kagyu Tradition in exile. Explore the topic of institutional migration and present the example of monasteries and Buddhist institutes (for e.g. shedras) which were established by, or in the name of XVI Gyalwa Karmapa Rangjung Rigpe Dorje in India or Nepal after 1959. Paper correspondingly investigates and deliberates on socio-cultural changes which appeared in explored monastic institutions, discuss their flexibility and adaptation abilities. Moreover paper presents how this very strict and homogeneous buddhist institutions incorporate modern technologies and reply to the development of internet and social media.
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Field #1. Religious configurations and transformation in Latin America
Field #2. Jonas Pereira de Oliveira Junior
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidade do Porto - FLUP
Field #5.
Field #6. Marché symbolique et identité religieuse: un bref profil des églises évangéliques au Brésil
Field #7. La mort attendue de la religion, basée sur certains principes fondamentaux de la modernité n’a pas eu lieu. Diagnostiques fatalistes ont échoué, étant désormais perçues uniquement comme une critique formulée contre une hypothétique « la foi n’est pas clarifiée au peuple ». L’analyse de ces propos a été bien comprise comme une critique partielle de la modernité par GUIDDENS, TOURAINE, HABERMAS. Ces critiques de la modernité identifient montrent que ce qui cause quelques intérêts dans l’approche moderne, n’était pas le phénomène religieux en soi concernant son impact parmi l’univers social, mais lentement sa disparition prétendue. Au Brésil il y a plusieurs options pour chosir quelle on peut église frequenter. Cette gamme qui varie entre le culte traditionnel culte pentecôtiste et le culte avec les néo-pentecôtistes. Les théoriciens postmodernes considèrent que nous sommes vivant dans une époque d’excès d’informations, la fragmentation du sujet, une crise des institutions, à savoir, augmentant la privatisation et l’individualisme. Le sujet postmodern est sans référence, dans la crise. Dans cette situation et sur les différentes options des églises, le « client fidèle », « foi », les consommateurs d’aujourd'hui cherchent les options sur le « marché religieux » une église qui corresponde à son profil. Comme nouveau Achiever de foi au Brésil, l’EURD agit sur le marché religieux brésilien avec des stratégies et des méthodes peu orthodoxes de collecte de fonds et d´engamement dans les médias, et, par consequent, a été exceller comme une église de succès.
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Field #1. Current Concerns in Parish and Congregational Research
Field #2. Schoeman WJ
Field #3.
Field #4. University of the Free State
Field #5.
Field #6. Evaluating congregational life in post-apartheid South Africa
Field #7. The post-apartheid South African context poses unique challenges to congregational life. The South African society needs of healing from its divided past as inequality on economic, political and social levels are characteristics of this society. Christian believes and practices play an essential role in society as a majority of the population adhere to the Christian faith. The main research question of this paper is: What inspirational practices would help to build a vital community of believers in the post-apartheid South Africa? The 2018/19 congregational survey and 2018 SA-NCLS will be used as empirical lenses to evaluate congregational life with specific reference to the inspirational core qualities of congregational life. What vision, leadership and innovation practices would enhance the role that congregations may play in the South African context? The aim is to provide a framework for the evaluation of inspirational practices in congregational life for post-apartheid South Africa.
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Field #1. The politics of religious diversity: the case of chaplaincy
Field #2. Sabina Hadzibulic
Field #3.
Field #4. Uppsala University, Faculty of Theology
Field #5.
Field #6. Spiritual Care in Swedish Prisons
Field #7. Although known as one of the most secularized countries in the world, Sweden has a long tradition of spiritual care (andlig vård) in public institutions such as hospitals, prisons and military. Traditionally, it was connected with the dominant Church of Sweden. With the increased immigration in the second half of the 20th century other minority religions entered the scene. Currently, there are around 170 priests, pastors, etc. offering the spiritual care in Swedish prisons. This paper aims to present a future research project focused on spiritual care in Swedish prisons. It deals with the importance of religion in retrieve processes among inmates with immigrant background. The case of study focuses on inmates with Eastern-Balkan background, close in terms of culture and language yet religiously diverse. Additionally, their long presence in Sweden makes them relevant for the research.
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Field #1. Field perspective and reverse angle: Politics of fieldwork in religious contexts
Field #2. Philippe Gonzalez
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Lausanne
Field #5.
Field #6. À la place du «consultant»: dialogue interreligieux, régulation du religieux et enquête sociologique
Field #7. Enquêter en ethnographe implique de tisser des relations durables avec les enquêtés. Cet engagement résulte toujours d’une négociation: le sociologue se voit contraint de déployer son enquête depuis le lieu assigné par les acteurs. Cette contrainte révèle les lignes de force qui traversent et structurent un monde social. C’est en particulier le cas lorsque le groupe étudié se sent marginalisé, voire stigmatisé, et revendique une plus grande reconnaissance au sein d’une sphère particulière (religieuse, p.ex.) ou de la part de la société. L’intérêt, l’expertise et la légitimité scientifiques du sociologue constituent ainsi un moyen, pour les acteurs, de grandir leur cause et de la légitimer. Cette contribution revient sur une enquête menée depuis 2015 sur la plateforme interreligieuse de Genève (PFIR). L’analyse de la catégorie «consultant», assignée par les acteurs au sociologue, révèle une reconfiguration de la sphère religieuse: la crédibilité croissante dont jouit la PFIR auprès des autorités, notamment dans des politiques publiques liées à l’intégration, entre en concurrence avec des Églises établies (réformée, catholique) qui, jusqu’alors, jouissaient de «relations privilégiées» avec l’État et régulaient cette même sphère. Au même moment, le Parlement genevois élabore une loi sur la laïcité et auditionne la PFIR. La présence du sociologue «consultant» apparaît alors comme un gage de légitimité pour le mode de régulation que promeut la PFIR: non confessionnel, pluraliste et favorable à une large présence publique des religions.
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Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Vanille Laborde
Field #3.
Field #4. CHERPA, IEP d'Aix-en-Provence
Field #5.
Field #6. Les acteurs locaux du gouvernement du religieux dans l'Education nationale : confrontation de cadrages et institutionnalisation de la critique dans l'académie d'Aix-Marseille
Field #7. Au croisement entre sociologie politique de la laïcité et analyse de l’action publique, cette communication sera attentive aux acteurs investis dans la mise en œuvre locale des politiques de gestion des faits religieux de l’Education nationale (EN): agents du rectorat constitués en nouveaux «professionnels» du religieux à l’école (référents laïcité, membres de l’Equipe académique laïcité), cadres de l’EN et enseignants-formateurs enrôlés dans des fonctions de passeurs entre les prescriptions ministérielles et les acteurs de terrain. Dans un contexte national de recomposition du régime de laïcité (Baudouin,Portier,2018) et de survenance d’attentats islamistes, un renouvellement des pratiques et rhétoriques se fait particulièrement visible dans le domaine scolaire (Lorcerie,2015). Nous montrerons que l’administration intermédiaire apparaît alors comme un lieu de production de matrices cognitives qui entrent en dissonance avec le cadrage ministériel. Le flou qui entoure certaines catégories légitimant l’action publique (comme la notion d’«atteintes à la laïcité», faussement évidente) favorise des réappropriations différenciées des prescriptions. Les acteurs intermédiaires, soumis à des injonctions contradictoires (tension entre réaffirmation de la visée universaliste de l’école et prise en compte des particularismes), arbitrent en faveur d’«accommodements» locaux des politiques promues après 2015. Une recherche dans l’académie d’Aix-Marseille met en évidence l’impact déterminant des acteurs intermédiaires dans les régulations effectives de ces politiques éducatives. Cette «institutionnalisation de la critique» (Rambaud,2009), qui s’accommode difficilement de l’exigence de neutralité et du devoir de réserve des fonctionnaires, fait apparaitre l’administration locale comme un forum des politiques publiques. Un engagement ethnographique sous-tend la récolte des matériaux utilisés (observation de cinq mois dans le service du rectorat chargé de décliner localement la politique nationale de gestion des faits religieux, trente entretiens, travail sur la littérature grise de l’administration intermédiaire).
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Field #1. The State and spiritual/religious healing processes in contemporary societies
Field #2. Borja Martín-Andino
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Field #5.
Field #6. «The Lord heals, restores, and delivers»: An ethnographic approach to Charismatic «inner healing» and its interaction with therapeutic models in contemporary Spain
Field #7. One of the main characteristics in Catholic Charismatic Renewal amid the diversity of Catholic movements is ritual healing, a therapeutic model that encompasses a series of care settings, each of them aimed at (though not limited to) illness in the three dimensions that, according to Charismatic statements, constitute humans: «body», «mind», and «spirit». As it is implicit in conversion processes and spiritual growth, ritual healing supports the reproduction of the plausibility’s structure in the movement. Based on data collected by means of ethnographic research with communities in Madrid and Barcelona, and focusing in care itineraries of several individual cases, this communication explores the cultural features of «inner healing», the prevailing care setting in ritual healing among Charismatics in Spain, and its interaction with other therapeutic models in secular and spiritual realms. In Catholic Charismatic Renewal, «inner healing» is recognized as a complementary form of treatment to clinical practice: both of them act on the individual dimension of «mind», and Charismatic ritual specialists usually refer to their counterparts in the clinic at the same time; not for nothing, «inner healing» is considered to have full and exclusive competences over the dimension of «spirit» in regards to secular therapeutic. Those competences collide, furthermore, with the therapeutic spirituality of New Age; and Charismatic opposition to that spiritual movement is expressed as a «spiritual warfare».
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Field #1. Religion, Gender and Human Rights: The (De)Secularization of Traditional Values
Field #2. marta roca escoda
Field #3.
Field #4. université de lausanne
Field #5.
Field #6. Mobilisations religieuses et démocratie directe en Suisse. Le cas de l’avortement
Field #7. Cette communication présente quelques résultats d’une enquête menée en Suisse autour des embarras que rencontre la parole d’acteurs religieux lorsqu’elle s’énonce dans l’espace public, pays sécularisé. Il s’agira ici de revenir sur des acteurs qui mobilisent la démocratie directe, et en particulier le dispositif des initiatives populaires, pour mettre en cause des lois actant des changements importants en matière de mœurs. À cet égard, l’histoire des votations portant sur l’interruption volontaire de grossesse est exemplaire : il fait apparaître comment ces acteurs, au travers leur prise de parole publique, parviennent à susciter des controverses. Si divers travaux montrent la force de mobilisation de différents acteurs religieux et signalent leur stratégie de sécularisation de leurs argumentaires, on peut aussi y lire un certain état de la parole publique religieuse : peinant à s’énoncer directement, sans embarras et sans détours, elle semble monopolisée par les segments les plus conservateurs (politiquement et théologiquement) des principales communautés religieuses. En portant notre attention sur un demi-siècle de débats et votations relatives à IVG, en contexte helvétique, nous identifierons les acteurs de ces contre-mobilisations ainsi que l’évolution de leur argumentaire et de leur rhétorique jusqu’à la dernière votation de 2014.
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Clécio Jamilson Bezerra Santos
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte
Field #5.
Field #6. "If these men keep quiet, the very stones will be crying out": notes on the relationship between Pentecostal evangelicals and sectors of institutionalized politics.
Field #7. In Brazil, nothing is more expressive of the growth of the public role of religion than the election of Jair Bolsonaro as president of the republic. An analysis of religious vows patterns (ALVES, 2018) points out that evangelicals constituted the religious group that weighed most for the result: 69% of them would have voted for the elected candidate (DATAFOLHA, 2018). At the beginning of 2018, Carta Capital magazine published an article on the Internet about the relationship between politics and religion in Brazil. In it Political scientist Clarisse Gurgel seeks to answer at least two problems: the insertion of Pentecostal actors and religious groups into the public domain and the "mismatch" between left and working class. We problematize in the work the assumption affirmed in the interview about the influence of religious ideas in the public domain as motivators of politico-economic positions. From a dialogical perspective (LOPES JUNIOR, 2013), we consider that the correlation between elements of both domains can only be established if preceded by the recognition of the categories of thought of the Pentecostal evangelicals themselves. From that point on, we propose to reflect on the insertion of actors and religious groups in the "public sphere" (BURITY, 2001), the relationship between religion and politics, and the difficulties of interaction between sectors of institutionalized politics and Pentecostal evangelical churches.
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Field #1. Hybrid religious identities: methodological implications
Field #2. Karoliina Dahl
Field #3.
Field #4. Åbo Akademi University
Field #5.
Field #6. “What was I thinking back then?” Comparing and discussing research material with the participants
Field #7. In this paper, I explore hybrid identities through experiences of the past and the present, and reflect on spaces and discussions that come about when participants relate to research material from an earlier research stage. The focus of my research is on young university students in Finland, their life-views and changes and continuities in these views. The research material was gathered in two stages, a first group of interviews were conducted in 2016 and a second round with 20 participants from the original group in 2018. All participants filled in a survey and took part in semi-structured interviews following the Faith-Q-Sort (FQS), a method in which the participant sorts 101 statements according to how well these describe him or her. Hybrid identity often refers to an identity of a person whose background is blend in two or more diverse cultures or traditions. In this paper, I approach hybrid identity through the participants’ experiences of identity in the past and the present. The survey responses and the FQS responses from the first interview were compared and discussed together with the participants at the end of the second interview. This opens up a dialogue between the previously conducted material and what has been expressed in the second interview. Additionally, it creates a space for confirmation of the participant’s personal story and identity but also a space for proposing questions such as “what was I thinking back then?” and “in what ways was I different and the same?”.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. beatrice de gasquet
Field #3.
Field #4. Université Paris Diderot
Field #5.
Field #6. Conflicts around Gender in Pluralizing Religious Fields: the case of contemporary French Synagogues
Field #7. Two conflicting trends have developed within French Judaism since the 1970s, making gender into a growingly salient issue: on the one hand a trend towards a stricter separation between men and women, and on the other hand, a trend towards increased female ritual participation in synagogues. This paper argues that both trends are part of the same movement towards intra-religious pluralization within a religious field (in the Bourdieusian sense). Whereas French Judaism has been highly centralized for an exceptionally long time, moments and sites of religious conflict around gender have coincided with moments of internal pluralization. The centrality of the traditional mainstream organization for Judaism (the Consistory) has successively been challenged, first by independent and more “Orthodox” synagogues, then by newly emerging Reform and massorti synagogues, and more recently by calls for a French “Modern Orthodoxy”. In these three cases, gender has been used as “a primary way of signifying relationships of power” (Scott), whether, respectively, by promoting increased separation between men and women, by promoting mixed seating and female ritual equality, or by arguing for both separate seating and female participation to ritual. The recent history of gender conflicts in French synagogues thus illustrates how religious conflicts around gender, far from being a constant, coincide with phases of autonomization (in the Bourdieusian sense of the term), transnationalization and differentiation in religious fields. (The presentation can be delivered either in French or in English)
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Field #1. Catholicism and Global Challenges
Field #2. Tricia Bruce
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Notre Dame
Field #5.
Field #6. Roman Catholic “Church” 2.0: Religious Property, Adaptive Reuse, and Competing Narratives of Community in a Postsecular World
Field #7. With an estimated 177 million acres of land (Goodlands 2018), the Roman Catholic Church ranks as (or near) the globe’s largest nongovernmental property owner. De-institutionalization (Hervieu-Leger 2003; Casanova, Taylor, McLean 2012) and a migrating population core (away from Europe and toward Latin America, the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa (Pew 2013)) predict substantial adaptations in the Catholic Church’s physical infrastructure. What happens to Catholic churches themselves once no longer used for religious (worship) purposes? How does this process of adaptation compare cross-culturally? Moreover, how do decisions about the material outcomes of Catholicism (church-as-building) (Brenneman and Miller 2016) interact with those regarding the symbolic and social outcomes of Catholicism (church-as-community) (Ammerman 2014; Bruce 2017)? This paper draws upon interviews, field data, and content analysis across multiple national contexts to (1) assess major factors impacting decisions about disused churches; (2) depict patterns in outcomes of disused churches globally; and (3) outline a theoretical and methodological agenda for tracking this phenomenon as it gains momentum in a postsecular world (Dillon 2017). Findings contend that the material conditions of “church” in modernity are not in decline but abeyance: diffused and realized anew via the adaptive reuse of buildings. Nonetheless, such transitions are accompanied by competing visions of community (or “common good”) articulated by local religious and secular actors, filtered through specific economic and cultural conditions, and indicative of broader cultural responses to Catholicism’s role in new religious fields.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. David Kloos
Field #3.
Field #4. Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV)
Field #5.
Field #6. Women, Professional Expertise, and the Islamic State in Malaysia
Field #7. State Islamization, both in the form of the expansion of state Islamic institutions and the public discourses that support this development, is often seen as detrimental to the rights and autonomies of women. This view deserves nuance. In some contexts, processes of bureaucratization and professionalization have made it easier, not harder, for women to get justice within the Islamic legal system, for instance. I engage with this debate by examining the relationship between the Islamic state in Malaysia, including the ‘reactionary’ agendas that have contributed to its growth, and the ways in which female religious authorities assert themselves as part of the public sphere. I focus on the intersections between religious authority and professional expertise. In the context of mass education, mass mediatization, and a feminized Muslim public domain saturated with techno-political language, female experts without Islamic (seminary) education – like doctors, lawyers, or psychologists – are able to successfully claim religious authority. Female preachers, meanwhile, professionalize their trade as they combine religious guidance and public performances with knowledge, skills and embodied practices associated with academic, medical and legal professions. These women are often ‘products’ of the state in the sense that they have benefited from state education programs and entwine their careers, in various ways, with the state. While institutions such as the Islamic courts or the national fatwa committee remain to be very patriarchal, it is important to consider the ways in which these women both support and critically engage with the Islamic state, sometimes in surprising ways.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Dorra Mameri-Chaambi
Field #3.
Field #4. GSRL-EPHE-PSL
Field #5.
Field #6. Des trajectoires et des idées : les rôles des femmes dans la gouvernance de l’Islam en France
Field #7. Véritable sujet d’étude dans le champ des Sciences Sociales, la question de l’évolution de l’Islam en France et de son institutionnalisation, a fait l’objet de recherches approfondies, nourries par des sources très diversifiées. Nous constatons en revanche, que l’intérêt scientifique de ces recherches se limite à un versant masculin de l’Histoire de la lutte pour la reconnaissance du fait musulman en France et de sa représentation. Minoré, voire délaissé par les observateurs attentifs, le rôle des femmes dans la gouvernance de l’Islam en France se révèle pourtant un sujet novateur et fécond. Cette communication ambitionne de retracer et d’analyser les parcours de femmes ayant contribué tour à tour des années 1980 à nos jours, à « asseoir l’Islam à la table de la République ». Ce travail est entrepris à la lumière de sources archivistiques (publiques et privées), d’enquêtes de terrain menées auprès des principales intéressées et de témoignages d’hommes, les ayant côtoyées, épaulées ou affrontées dans le Paysage Islamique Français (PIF). Il s’agira de tenter de saisir les enjeux ayant motivé leur combat et de comprendre la ou les spécificités de leur cheminement, pour parvenir à s’imposer ou non, dans un univers profondément masculin ?
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Field #1. Liberation Christianity in Latin America. Politics, Religion and Spirituality in the Global South
Field #2. Gustavo Seferian
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidade Federal de Lavras
Field #5.
Field #6. Strike of the Queixadas (1962-1969) as an experience of Liberationist Christianity
Field #7. The paper proposes a discussion about the Strike of the Queixadas, led by the Cement, Lime and Gypsum workers Union of São Paulo, Brazil (1962-1969), as an expression of Liberationist Christianity. Although the role of Catholic Action - which includes the Catholic Workers Youth, or simply the JOC - as one of the original motors of the Christian social movement in Latin America (Löwy), it's necessary further reflections about conception of life, community and social struggle imbued with Christian references in the structuring and strengthening of this movement, marked by participation of the JOCist militancy and which had not only exceptional duration, but also faced one of the most somber periods in the brazilian history. In this way, it intends to (i) seek in the mobilizations conducted by the workers of the region during the 1950s the social and political roots of the strike of the Queixadas; (ii) give an overview of the main episodes of the strike, as well as its requirements, deeply markeds by the demands for freedom of association and worker’s self-management; (iii) analyze the articulation role made by the christian lawyer Mário Carvalho de Jesus, recognizing their role as one of the responsibles for the creative incorporation of the tradition of “Économie et humanisme” into the Brazilian reality, marked by the loss of anti-communist traits; (iv) find out the impact of this mobilization on the formation of other Christian workers’ struggles, such as the Cobrasma’s strike, the Metalworking Oppositions and the National Front of Labor.
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Miroslav Tížik
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute for Sociology, Slovak Academy of Sciences
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious Minority as a Source of a National and State Identity. The Case of Slovakia.
Field #7. In Central Europe the role of religion in the creation of modern states has many different faces. In some dominantly Catholic countries, religious minorities were mostly those that served as important sources of national movement of emancipation from dominant political rule, which had often been connected with dominant religion. In case of Hungary, the Reformed Church (Calvinism) was an important source of national movement against Catholic Habsburgs in 18th and 19th Century. In Czech lands at the beginning of 20th Century, various forms of Protestantism became important sources of Czechoslovak movement against Habsburgs Catholicism. In Slovakia, Lutheran Church has a similar history. In spite of a small proportion of believers (12-15% in population in 19th Century) it was one of two fundamental sources of Slovak national movement in the last two centuries. Therefore understanding the contemporary character of the State, Society and National identity and its relation to religion is not possible without including the bi-confessionalism of Slovak national movement that started in the 18th Century. Although Lutheran religious minority has been disappearing since 1990 (to about 5% of the population in 2011) it is still present in the character of contemporary institutions of national tradition and identity.
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Field #1. Socio-anthropology of Salafism in Europe
Field #2. Anne-Laure Zwilling
Field #3.
Field #4. CNRS, Strasbourg
Field #5.
Field #6. La « guerre du livre » : la présence du salafisme dans l’édition de livres musulmans en langue française
Field #7. Cette contribution se base sur les résultats d’une enquête réalisée en 2017-2018 par une équipe de chercheurs strasbourgeois sur l’offre de livre religieux musulmans francophones. Le but de la recherche était de cerner quelle littérature confessionnelle est aujourd'hui disponible pour les musulmans francophones cherchant à mieux connaître leur religion. Cette recherche a permis notamment de cerner les acteurs impliqués (auteurs et maisons d’édition notamment), le type d’ouvrages publiés, leur contenu, et le public visé. Dans cette offre de publication, le salafisme tient une place importante : nombreux sont les ouvrages publiés qui présentent un contenu plus ou moins explicitement lié à cette doctrine. La contribution restituera les résultats de la recherche sur ce point : à partir d’une étude des thèmes traités ainsi que des auteurs et textes publiés, elle permettra de tracer les contours de la présence salafiste dans les ouvrages publiés en français, les modalités de cette présence, et le contenu du discours offert.
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Field #1. Religion and the Contemporary Right
Field #2. Fabio Bolzonar
Field #3.
Field #4. GSRL, CNRS–École Pratique des Hautes Études
Field #5.
Field #6. Catholic Moralism in Power: the Influence of Religion Beliefs on the Family Policies of the Northern League
Field #7. In the last two decades, several far-right populist parties have become pivotal political actors in various European countries. The increasing electoral consensus has allowed to some of these parties to influence the national political debates and to shape policy decisions. In the effort of broadening their electoral appeal, several far-right populist movements have instrumentally used religious values to support their exclusionary policies, also in the field of morality politics. This paper studies the influence of Catholic moralism on the family legislation introduced by the Northern League (LN) in Italy since this party came to power in 2018. Although the role of religion in shaping the LN’s anti-immigration policies have received great attention, the influence of Catholicism on the social policy agenda of this party has been the object of limited focused debate, even though the LN has increasingly presented itself as the better defender of Catholic family values. Through the study of the speeches of the LN’s leaders, party documents, news in the press, semi-structured interviews with senior LN’s members, and legislative documents, this paper will explain the role of Catholicism in framing some representative reforms of the family legislation proposed by the LN; understand the influence of Catholic values on key family policies introduced by this party; and discuss how Catholicism has helped to consolidate the institutional linkages between the LN and some Catholic organisations that support anti-gender and anti-feminist projects.
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Field #1. Religion, spirituality and the dynamics of class relations
Field #2. Lars Ahlin
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Aarhus
Field #5.
Field #6. The class background for the explosive growth of alternative therapy (including yoga, meditation and mindfulness
Field #7. During the last 35 to 40 years, the use of alternative therapy (including yoga, meditation and mindfulness) has had an explosive growth. During the same period, the whole economic system in the west has changed profoundly. From one inspired by John Maynard Keynes to one inspired by Milton Friedman. The society has, as a result, been reshaped from a traditional social democratic society to a society dominated by a neo-liberal ideology. This change has had a direct impact on the life of everyone. One observed effect has been the growth of the “precariat” consisting of two distinctive parts, one containing those living under social conditions similar to those of the traditional working class, the other containing individuals with a high degree of education, a part of the middle class. A common denominator for those two seemingly very different groups it the precariousness of their employment. I will discuss the significance of this development in relation to the growth of alternative therapy with the point of departure primarily in Richard Sennet and Axel Honneth. Further, the effects for the single individual will be presented with help of statistics dealing with stress as a widespread disease. Eventually I will discuss alternative therapy and its explosive growth, as a way of managing symptoms, resulting from the social experiences for individuals in the precariat and not because of a spiritual revolution.
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Stefania Palmisano
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Turin
Field #5.
Field #6. Catholicism in the line of fire? The challenge of contemporary spirituality in Italy
Field #7. In this talk I shall explore the phenomenon of so-called “alternative spiritualities” on the basis of data from a recent survey on Italians’ religiosity, and how it is challenging Italian Catholicism. My thesis is that the Italian example clearly demonstrates an interrelationship, or rather a dialectical rapport, between (alternative) spiritualities and religion: the two categories are inter-defined to the extent that it is no longer possible to define one without the other. Spirituality and religion interact, enriching each other through encounters, conflicts and assimilation stimulating continuous innovation and change. Empirical analysis permits reflection upon theoretical, epistemological and methodological questions raised by the spirituality concept in sociology.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Stephanie Müssig
Field #3.
Field #4. Erlangen Center for Islam and Law in Europe
Field #5.
Field #6. Islamic norms and decision-making of Muslims
Field #7. What role do religious norms play for non-religious behavior? What is their value compared to other – secular – norms for shaping attitudes and behavior. On the basis of factorial survey data, I investigate the basis for decision-making of Muslims when distributing an inheritance between heirs: Islamic norms or other decision cues, such as neediness or deservingness of the heir. First results of the quantitative analysis suggest that Islamic norms are not the key tool for Muslims in Germany when deciding about the “just” distribution of means. This research sheds light on the relative importance of religious norms for Muslims in a Western European country. It challenges the widespread assumption that Muslims accept Islamic norms as guiding lines for any of their attitudes and behavior. Thereby, it brings the ongoing debate about how Muslims’ values are compatible with values of Western societies to a more objective and factual level.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion, Gender and Human Rights: The (De)Secularization of Traditional Values
Field #2. Milda Alisauskiene
Field #3.
Field #4. Vytautas Magnus University
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion, Politics and LGBT Rights in Contemporary Lithuania
Field #7. This paper addresses the problem of the role of religion within the process of implementation of LGBT rights in contemporary Lithuania. Since the decriminalization of homosexuality in 1993 LGBT community faces social exclusion due to the dominating cultural and social norms supported by traditional and conservative powers in Lithuanian society. Religious and political elites ground their antagonism towards LGBT community in the doctrine of Roman Catholic Church and its approach to the practices of homosexuality. The social research data shows rather low importance of religion, its practices and low level of knowledge about religion of Lithuanian society. At the same time Lithuanian society supports conservative values and distances itself from LGBT community. What is the actual role of religion in the Lithuanian public attitudes toward LGBT rights? This paper argues that public attitudes towards LGBT rights are not influenced by religious beliefs but rather by the religious and political elites that construct the antagonism to LGBT rights answering to the values of the society and its expectations. This paper is based on the analysis of Lithuanian Roman Catholic Church documents and public statements about LGBT rights, data of public surveys and research into LGBT community – survey and interviews conducted in 2017-2018.
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Field #1. The reciprocal influence of religion and demography
Field #2. Laurie DeRose
Field #3. Brad Wilcox
Field #4. University of Maryland, College Park
Field #5.
Field #6. Faith and Fertility in the 21st Century
Field #7. Gender equality is increasingly thought to be the new natalism—the force that will bring about the reemergence of sustainable fertility from below replacement levels. Women who anticipate taking on a disproportionate share childrearing responsibilities are more likely to opt out of childbearing than those who anticipate involved partners. Because religion fosters traditional gender roles, its pronatalist influence could diminish in a world where gender equality is emerging as the new natalism. We use four waves of World Values Survey data from low-fertility countries to show that religion’s positive influence on fertility has not in fact waned in recent decades. We suggest that marriage plays an important role in understanding religion’s continued positive influence: those with egalitarian gender role attitudes are less likely to be married and have slightly fewer children. Religion has become a stronger positive predictor of marriage and childbearing over time. Although our submission reads somewhat like a completed paper, we plan an important addition before the conference: disaggregating our results by region. We will test whether the interrelationships between religion, fertility, and gender role attitudes that we document are consistent across various parts of Europe, North and South America, East Asia, and Oceania.
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Field #1. Tracing Religion as a Global, Transcultural Knowledge Category
Field #2. Caroline SAPPIA
Field #3.
Field #4. UCLouvain
Field #5.
Field #6. Une certaine perspective sur la sociologie de la religion : communication exploratoire sur les origines et le développement de la FERES (Fédération internationale des instituts de recherches sociales et socioreligieuses), 1958-1970’
Field #7. En 1958, la FERES – Fédération internationale des instituts de recherches socioreligieuses – est fondée par François Houtart à Louvain (Belgique). Ce réseau a suscité la création de centres de recherche socioreligieuse et a promu des recherches scientifiques en Europe, en Amérique latine, en Amérique du Nord, en Asie et en Afrique. Ces différents centres ont constitué un réseau et ont rassemblé un corpus de connaissances sur les religions. Ils ont développé un type de recherches avec l’ambition de mettre à jour et d’analyser les phénomènes religieux contemporains dans le monde. Un des objectifs de la FERES était d’informer l’Église catholique sur les évolutions religieuses contemporaines afin de contribuer à la réalisation de sa mission d’évangélisation. Plus largement, ce réseau de recherche a également analysé les contextes sociaux, économiques et politiques des pays étudiés. Cette communication exploratoire a pour objectif de faire le point sur le type de recherches soutenues ainsi que sur les institutions scientifiques faisant partie de ce réseau, dans les différents contextes de transformations religieuses des différents espaces géographiques d’action de la FERES et ce, particulièrement, en Amérique latine. In Fine, nous analyserons les thématiques et les méthodes développées dans ces réseaux (tant quantitatives que qualitatives), leurs affinités et leurs généalogies.
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Field #1. The Orient at Home: The Religious-Other and the Transformation of the Urban Space
Field #2. Anna Clot Carolina Esteso
Field #3. Rosa Martínez Víctor Albert
Field #4. ISOR-UAB
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious flavours, symbolic boundaries and performances of diversity: The case of Raval in Barcelona
Field #7. Raval, the well-known “multicultural” district in Barcelona, is the par excellence urban enclave in which cultural and religious diversity is represented and disputed. It is one of the districts with the highest percentage of foreign population and religious minorities as well as object of related urban interventions and transformations as the ongoing gentrification illustrates. Drawing on the ethnographic work developed in the neighbourhood, we have observed that food plays central role in the ways in which this diversity is materially experienced, collectively negotiated and politically governed in Raval. From a remarkable presence of shops and restaurants with a religious and/or ethnic mark that attracting varied public, to civic and religious associations that use food in their activities, political actions and festivities. This paper examines the role of food in performances of diversity. First, how it is a vehicle that helps to build communitarian ties and relations between civil and religious actors in the neighbourhood, but at the same time it can enforce boundaries among them. Secondly, how the food normalises the public presence of racialised groups and religious minorities, but it also serves also to exoticize them. Finally, how food shows the contradictory and contested definitions of religion, culture and heritage in public space.
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Field #1. Theoretical approaches to the social sciences from the field work on religion and spirituality in the global South
Field #2. Karina Bárcenas Barajas
Field #3.
Field #4. National Autonomous University of Mexico
Field #5.
Field #6. Moral panic and "gender ideology": Latin American appropriations about global imaginaries
Field #7. The anti-gender movements, articulated from civil society, parliamentary spaces and religious spaces, in the three scenarios with strong Catholic and evangelical roots, have generated, in different regions of the world such as Europe, North America and Latin America, global imaginaries related to the dangers represented by the "gender ideology", generating with it various scenarios of moral panic, which contribute to the stigma, discrimination and criminalization of sexual diversity. From the concept of moral panic –central in the theoretical proposal of authors such as Stanley Cohen, Philip Jenkins and Roger Lancaster– in articulation with three anthropological anchors –etnography in the public space, digital ethnography and legal anthropology– in this paper will be analyze how such global imaginaries, associated with moral panic and "gender ideology", are appropriate and resignified in Latin America, particularly in countries such as Mexico and Brazil, having as a consequence the normalization of symbolic violence towards people of sexual diversity and the restriction of secular rights and liberties.
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Field #1. Redefining ‘secularism’: European states and the regulation of (minority) religions
Field #2. Tobias Müller
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Cambridge
Field #5.
Field #6. Governing “everyday Muslims” through the “everyday state”: Relational state theory and agency in diverse urban neighbourhoods
Field #7. Recent analytical turns towards ethical self-identification (Saba Mahmood, Charles Hirschkind) and everyday life worlds of Muslims (Samuli Schielke) have challenged accounts of agency prevalent in contemporary political thought (Nadia Fadil, Mayanthi Fernando). However, while these developments successfully account for a high level of differentiation regarding Muslim experiences as minority religion, they often operate with an inadequately theorised understanding of the nation state. This is because anthropological studies of particular religious groups often neglect theoretical developments in how to conceptualise the polymorphous assemblage that is the state. In turn, political theory has so far only inadequately responded to the challenges of conceptions of equality and agency advanced by scholars of Muslims and Islam in Europe. This paper seeks to bridge the gap produced by the lack of mutual engagement of anthropology and political theory regarding interactions of Muslims and the state. It addresses the problem of the insufficient reflections on how the everyday of Muslim life worlds relates to the state as an assemblage that needs to be adequately theorised in its everyday practices and effects. It seeks to address the question, how should we conceptualise “everyday” Islam interacting with the “everyday” state set in the predominantly liberal-secular knowledge orders in Europe? The paper is based on twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork on practices of engagement between street level bureaucrats and Muslims, including imams, women's rights activists and social workers, in two very diverse urban neighbourhoods, Hasenbergl/Milbertshofen, Munich, and Brent, London. The paper introduces the notion of "state projects" as a conceptual bridge between the ethnographic accounts of capillary, everyday practices connecting Muslims and the state, and the conceptual concerns of state theory. The perspective of conflicting state projects allows us to account for incoherences and conflicts produced by the knowledge orders, practices and subjectivities that are mobilised in order to achieve particular state objectives such as security, identity and diversity. The paper proposes to combine the strategic-relational analysis developed in the state theory of Bop Jessop with the Foucaultian notion of the regimes of governmentality that analyse the relational state from the perspective of the microphysics of power at the margins.
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Field #1. The politics of religious diversity: the case of chaplaincy
Field #2. Andrea Beláňová
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute of Sociology of the Czech Academy of Sciences
Field #5.
Field #6. Institution of Chaplaincy 25 Years After Czechoslovakia
Field #7. Czechoslovakia existed as one country of two nations for 75 years. After the peaceful split in 1993, two independent republics emerged, namely the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Sharing the same modernization processes in the next decades, however, the role of religion and Roman Catholic Church in the two countries took different directions. Whereas the in the Czech Republic the secularization has been deepening, Slovakia keeps a specific form of a semi state-church. This paper focuses on the multi-denominational institution of chaplaincy in the areas of hospital, prison, army, police, firemen, and mountain rescue service; and the impact the shifting boundaries between religious and secular spheres have on its development in the two countries. Through the lens of the Kees De Groot’s (2006; 2008; 2018) dichotomy of liquid and solid church, the presentation argues that chaplaincy may serve as an illustrative case of different positions of the church and religion in these two post-communist countries. Based on two years of field research and by focusing on the three types of relationship between solid and liquid church (De Groot 2008; 2018), the paper uses the concepts of conflict, tension, and development as a vital way to describe the differences between the two socio-cultural milieus taking examples from the chaplaincy practice. De Groot, Kees. 2006. The Church in Liquid Modernity: A Sociological and Theological Exploration of a Liquid Church. International Journal for the Study of the Christian Church 6 (1):91–103. De Groot, Kees. 2008. Three Types of Liquid Religion. Implicit Religion 11 (3):277–297. De Groot, Kees. 2018. The Liquidation of the Church. Oxon, New York: Routledge.
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Field #1. -- No Session --
Field #2. Einat Libel Hass
Field #3. Einat Libel Hass
Field #4. Ashkelon College
Field #5.
Field #6. The Floaters - Individuals who wander between Liberal and other Tel-Aviv Congregations
Field #7. Researchers of Israeli Liberal Judaism have paid little attention to individuals who move between congregations. This paper focuses on those "floaters", who are on a continuous journey between the various liberal congregations Tel-Aviv offers. Their stories were collected for my doctoral dissertation on Liberal Judaism in Tel-Aviv. I examined floaters in light of the rise of individualism, the intensification of consumerism, and the shift from a dwelling-based spirituality (inhabiting sacred places) to a seeking-oriented one (Wuthnow, 1998). The paper analyzes the floaters' characteristics, the reasons behind their wanderings, their attitude towards the congregations they move between, and their religious-spiritual identities. The paper shows their identities to be part of the innovative religious-spiritual identities currently being formed in Israel, while highlighting floaters' tendency to be active in a specific, local urban context that has a distinct character compared to the rest of the country. Hence the floaters' identities may be regarded as Tel-Aviv versions of the religious-spiritual identities being formed in Israel. Literature has indicated a strong connection between the character of the Tel-Aviv context, and the creativity of different identities developed in this context. The uniqueness of the floaters' identities stems from their Tel-Aviv nature, as well as the fact that they have been formed while wandering among liberal congregations. Moreover, it seems that the floaters themselves, as individuals, form the connective tissue that keeps the religious-spiritual identity they had concocted for themselves together, whether its roots are solely Jewish, or lie in other spiritual traditions as well.
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Field #1. Religion and Bioethics
Field #2. Elena Medvedeva
Field #3.
Field #4. Saratov State Medical Universiry
Field #5.
Field #6. Abortion and religion in Russia: how it perceived by healthcare providers
Field #7. Regional branches of Russia’s Health Ministry and maternity hospitals across the country have been enforcing temporary “moratoriums” on abortion services, as part of a campaign called “Give Me Life!” In different regions, psychologists counsel women to “orient them toward family values. In the last 20 years, the proportion of Russian citizens who consider abortion unacceptable has actually tripled from 12% to 35%. The study found that women held a more strict view with about 40% condemning abortion in all cases as compared to about 31% of men. There was main reason for this change in attitude: the efforts of the Russian Orthodox Church working closely together with the Russian state. But in Russia, little is known about the personal and professional attitudes of individuals who are currently working in abortion service provision. Exploring religion and faith as the factors which determine health care providers' involvement or disengagement in abortion services may facilitate improvement in the understanding of causes this phenomena. Qualitative research methods were used to collect data. Twelve in-depth interviews and one focus group discussion were conducted with health care providers who were involved in a range of abortion provision in the Saratov region, Russia. Data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Almost all providers were concerned about the rise of difficulties women faced in seeking an abortion and the intervention of priests and orthodox psychologists in process of preparing to abortion.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Catholicism and Global Challenges
Field #2. Maria Forteza
Field #3.
Field #4. ISOR-UAB
Field #5.
Field #6. Catholic Pluralism. A comparison among lay movements
Field #7. Nowadays, religion is characterized by individualization. Therefore, individuals choose not only the religion they want to regulate their life, but also which elements of the religion they want to follow in order to their preferences. The construction of the self-biography leads, on one side, to a religious market where the individual becomes a consumer, and, on the other side, to a religion à la carte where individuals are legitimated to select concrete elements of the religious tradition. Even if religions are facing individualization, there exists also a necessity of living the religious experience in community. In front of these phenomenon, many autors have talked about the decline of the Catholic Church, but, at the same time, lay movements have a significative vitality. What could be the causes of such a success? My thesis is that lay movements offer different ways of living Catholicism. I analyse three lay movements: Sant’Egidio, Cursillos de Cristiandad and Camino Neocatecumenal. I want to expose which are the different frames of sense they offer in front of which Catholics are able to choose how to regulate their catholic beliefs and practices. Can we talk about a market of lay movements? In what sense this diversity is an aspect of the Catholic pluralism? Some authors speak about the deinstitutionalisation of the Catholic Church, but, couldn’t it be a change of the form of institution? An adaptation of the institution to Modernity?
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Gergely Rosta
Field #3.
Field #4. Pazmany Peter Catholic University
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious change in Hungary – trends and mechanisms
Field #7. Religious change in Hungary – trends and mechanisms Earlier studies on religious change in Hungary have shown that there has been a decline of church-related religiosity, and parallel to that a strengthening of belief in various religious instances. Additionally, it has been also shown that there are opposing mechanisms behind the two processes: weakening religious practice basically reflects the classic secularization mechanism of intergenerational exchanges, while the increasing belief happens within the age cohorts, suggesting that changes within the individual life-cycles are the main causes for it. (Tomka 2010, Rosta 2008, 2012) These results stem mostly from pre-2010 surveys. This fact as well as a more thorough exploration of the underlying mechanisms of opposing religious processes were the motivations of the research project "Religious Change in Hungary" (supported by the NKFI Fund of the Hungarian National Research, Development and Innovation Office under project number K 119679) that examines religious processes in Hungary by using qualitative (in-depth interviews with members of three generations of families) and quantitative (nation-wide representative survey and an experimental panel study) methods. In my presentation I am going to show first results from this research project, focusing on three main issues: - A description of religious change in Hungary using results from the quantitative part of the study and the latest EVS data. - A quantitative analysis of the mechanisms of religious change, also using survey data. - Key elements of religious socialization and religious change within the individual biography, based on the in-depth interviews.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. Peter Andersen
Field #3. Peter Gundelach
Field #4. University of Copenhagen
Field #5.
Field #6. The Complexity Approach to the Development of Religiosity
Field #7. Over the years, a number of studies have addressed the changes in religious values and activities in order to find support for different theoretical approaches to the study of religiosity, particularly secularisation, privatization or individualisation. However, empirical evidence has shown that none of these approaches offers comprehensive and consistent patterns of interpretation of the development. This has led Furseth and other scholars to term the picture as “complex”. The present paper offers an individual level analysis of religious change based on the methodological and theoretical approach of the complexity frame of reference. Based on the Danish part of the World Value Survey 1981-2017, we investigate the relations between individual religious belief and other social values. A cluster analysis identifies a number of clusters of people whose religious attitudes are relatively similar. The clusters are shown to correlate with moral and family values, but they have only low of correlations to values regarding the distribution of wealth and other general political values
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Field #1. Social Movements, Rebellions and Revolutions through Religious Contention
Field #2. Noah Oehri
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Bern
Field #5.
Field #6. Interrogating an Experiment of Liberation and Peasant Mobilization: ‘Los Cristianos en Lucha’ in Puno (1977-1981)
Field #7. In contrast to the thus far prevalent trend of secularization, the 1970s and 1980s witnessed the reemergence of religion as a political resource. This paper traces how a network of pastoral workers shaped post-Medellin pastoral discourse and practices in support of peasant rights and organizations towards the late stages of the Peruvian Revolution. By doing so, I aim to understand how the discursive construction of ‘liberation’ was tied to the autonomous organization of the peasantry which, in line with the ecclesiastical commitment, challenged state-led, corporatist reform policies. Focusing on a critical analysis of the experience of Los Cristianos en Lucha, a group of politically engaged peasants from the Prelature of Ayaviri and the Diocese of Puno, this paper examines how changes in pastoral orientation led to an increasingly critical reflection on the positionality of religious and lay actors in the praxis of liberation. Based on a detailed analysis of meeting reports (1977-1981) and archival files collected on the Peruvian altiplano, I argue that the group’s discussions of bible texts led to a (re)interpretation of (popular) religion as a political resource for the emerging peasant movements. Combining a contextual analysis of the ‘most progressive region of the Peruvian Church’ (Klaiber, 1992) with a discussion of a localized experiment of concientización, this paper ultimately seeks to shed new light on the interplay between religion and social mobilization in the wake of land redistribution and internal armed conflict in the Southern Andes.
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Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. Itamara Freires de Meneses
Field #3. Maria Lúcia Bastos Alves
Field #4. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte
Field #5.
Field #6. The land of Padre Cícero and religious tourism: an analysis of the pilgrimages of Juazeiro do Norte
Field #7. Every year the city of Juazeiro do Norte receives thousands of pilgrims who visit and pay devotion to "Padim Ciço". The devotees see the place as sacred and Father Cicero as a saint, for despite the resistance of the Catholic Church "the godfather was canonized by the people" (PAZ, 2011, p. 24). Juazeiro do Norte, a municipality located in the South of the State of Ceará - Brazil, in the Metropolitan Region of the country has 270,383 inhabitants, according to IBGE. The municipality is predominantly Catholic and one of the largest centers of pilgrimages in the country. This fact makes the municipality a legitimate place for pilgrimages. From an empirical work the study problematizes the category "religious tourism" in the pilgrimages of Juazeiro do Norte. Understanding in turn that the boundaries between the religious and the tourist are blurred. Religious tourism is an analytical category of great complexity. Complex is also the pilgrimage, since, it is observed as a religious event that aggregates a number of elements. In the event we note religious practices and many others that extrapolate the logic of the sacred and approach activities of a more profane character. In view of the presented scenario, the work approaches the pilgrimages of Juazeiro do Norte as a means that allows reflections on religious tourism and evidences that pilgrimages are phenomena of infinite proportions and interpretations.
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Field #1. Singing, Ritualising and Memory Making
Field #2. Amanda Silva
Field #3. Maria Alves
Field #4. Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte
Field #5.
Field #6. Point of Resurrection: traversing pilgrimage paths through of the electric trio. An analysis of the pilgrims songs in Juazeiro do Norte, Ceará.
Field #7. The pilgrimages of Juazeiro do Norte, the inner city of northeastern Brazil, are inserted in a field of cultural effervescence. People from all over Brazil meet to thank the blessings of "Padrinho", Father Cicero. This adds to with the ontological enriching of the field and complexifies its analysis. In considering practices about pilgrims, it was found that they transcended their pre-judgments. Performing a thorough ethnographic work makes it possible to observe the dissonances and convergences between what is said and what is practiced by the interlocutors, especially regarding the musical dimension. This "party of heaven on earth", as the pilgrims call it, has two constants: devotion and song. Whether it is the singing intoned or accompanied by a band, this reinforced the link and in the constructions of the memories. As the pilgrimages are triggered the plural interactions, approach the relevant event of the official calendar of pilgrimages: the Point of Resurrection. On Easter Sunday the devotees do the procession following an electric trio with Catholic songs with pulsating rhythms. In 2016 the Kairós Band ends the event with its stylized forró, provoking a problematization of the repertoire by some devotees. Thus, it was sought to comprehend the as the plurality of the pilgrims in relation to the rituals, at the same time as to the strengthening of the collective and its negotiations.
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Field #1. Major Transformations in Latin American Religious Practices: Globalization, Transnationalization, and Pentecostalization
Field #2. Rosa Maria Aquino
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco/UFRPE
Field #5.
Field #6. L'avancée du pentecôtisme chez les gitans brésiliens
Field #7. Le recensement de 2010 met en évidence l'augmentation de la pentecostalisation brésilienne: 22% de la population est évangélique ou protestante, dont 60% sont pentecôtistes. En 2000, ils atteignaient 15%. Investissements dans les médias, prosélytisme agressif, promesses de victoires matérielles et spirituelles offertes par les églises pentecôtistes, et notamment possibilité d'inclusion dans une société caractérisée par une grande inégalité sociale, conquièrent chaque jour des personnes de différentes classes sociales, en particulier des classes défavorisées, mais aussi les minorités ethniques qui composent l’éventail de la société brésilienne. C'est le cas des gitans. Ils sont victimes de l'invisibilité qui caractérise souvent les minorités sociales, mais aussi de l'exotisation et des préjugés. Bien qu’ils aient des traits culturels spécifiques, leur adhésion à la croyance pentecôtiste provoque des changements dans leur ethos de la même manière que chez d’autres brésiliens. Leurs motivations ne sont pas non plus différentes. Ils cherchent à résoudre les problèmes d’ordre personnel, d’augmentation de la haute estime, d’être reconnus comme citoyens. Cependant, l'identité tsigane ne coexiste pas toujours harmonieusement avec l'identité pentecôtiste. Si, d’une part, être tsigane garantit certaines libertés découlant de ses traditions, d’autre part, être un tsigane pentecôtiste nécessite de nouveaux comportements qui peuvent entrer en conflit avec ceux de l’être tsigane. Je propose donc de discuter de l’influence de la pentecostalisation brésilienne sur l’univers gitan. Comment se fait la médiation pour la coexistence entre identité gitane et identité pentecôtiste? Y a-t-il un chevauchement d'une identité sur l'autre?
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Field #1. Hybrid religious identities: methodological implications
Field #2. Miren Iziar Basterretxea Moreno
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Deusto
Field #5.
Field #6. ORTHODOXY AND ORTHOPRAXIS. CATHOLIC AND EVANGELICAL IN BILBAO
Field #7. The Basque Country, traditionally strongly Catholic, has experienced in recent years a process of "disbelief" that places it as one of the most secularised territories in Spain. Almost 50% of the population declares themselves as "non-believers" and their attitude towards religions is, generally speaking, of rejection. Added to this we find a growing number of people who define their selves as non-Catholic believers. Consequently, we can say that the different beliefs conform numerically and socially a minority reality which is, at the same time, fragmented and plural and in which the migratory phenomenon has an important weight. In this context, one can ask not only about the way of living the belief of people of different faiths, but about the forms, if any, in which social, cultural and religious perspectives permeate each other. Focussed on this possible mutual impregnation of perspectives, in this communication we try to explore when, people belonging to different faiths and sociocultural context, that is, Catholics and Evangelicals, Latin Americans and Bilbao natives, justify the refusal of the orthodoxy. The question is framed within a broader study on "lived religion" in which in-depth interviews have been conducted with people of different traditions and beliefs. The data collected so far reflects that even if some differences persist, generally speaking, believers stay free in front of religious orthodoxy, so what do we talk about when talking about religion or about the role it plays in personal and social development?.
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 1
Field #2. Dominika Motak
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute for the Study of Religions, Jagiellonian University
Field #5.
Field #6. Georg Simmel’s concept of religion as a contribution to the social theory
Field #7. In his introduction to “The New Blackwell Companion to the Sociology of Religion” (2010) Bryan S. Turner addresses the question why would the sociology of religion matter from the point of view of sociology as a whole, and answers: because it is the very nature of the social itself which is at stake here: ‘sociologists have been interested in religion because it is assumed to contain the seeds of social life as such’. Turner illustrates this point by the example of Durkheim, but in my opinion his statement applies equally to Georg Simmel - one of the founding fathers of sociology, whose writings on religion continue to be neglected by general sociologists. It would be difficult to find another classical sociologist whose understanding of society would be so inextricably interwoven with their theory of religion as it is the case in Simmel, who attempted to reveal the common root of both social as well as religious phenomena: a drive for unity. This cohesive force expresses itself in elementary emotions (“social feelings”) that play the crucial role in creation of all social institutions, including “objective religion”. The objective religion is structured around the idea of God, which constitutes a conceptual equivalent of society. The main common features of these two notions are found in the phenomenon of faith and in the idea of unity. This paper will reflect on Simmel’s concept of religion and discuss its implications for the social theory.
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Field #1. Religious Minorities: Muslims in the West and Minorities in the Islamic Societies
Field #2. fertiana santy
Field #3.
Field #4. Institut d'Etudes Politiques d'Aix-en-Provence
Field #5.
Field #6. Representation of Muslim Women in French Jurisprudence: Critical Discourse Analysis
Field #7. Contemporary France is a divided society. Minorities, including Muslim (women) immigrants, encounter inequality and bigotry – from public spaces to employment opportunities – particularly racism and religious discrimination. This has disproportionately affected Muslim women who wear religious attire, such as a headscarf or a burkini, and led to a series of legal disputes in the contexts of French secular laws of laïcité. This study undertook a critical analysis of legal discourses on the representation of Muslim women in French jurisprudence. Specifically, the research investigated the decisions concerning Muslim women in two Supreme Courts of France: Court of Cassation (Cour de Cassation) and State Council (Conseil d’État). The two featured legal cases are commonly called the Baby-Loup case (ruled against a headscarf-wearing Muslim worker) and the burkini case (ruled in favour of Muslim women and lifting the burkini ban). The main theoretical framework informing the analysis of data is Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), with secondary analysis using the social constructionist theory. CDA views discourse as a social practice that constitutes the societal order of different social practices. The courts formulate their decisions on particular cases regarding Muslim women's headscarves or burkinis, which inevitably results in social and legal consequences. Therefore, it can lead to an understanding of the macro-discourse social structures, such as power. The analysis supports the conclusion that the jurisprudences raise issues of socio-political nature about the power and the dominant ideology of law institutions in representing Muslim women in France and in treating them as non-preferred citizens, a burden within a majoritarian, secular society.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Line Nyhagen
Field #3.
Field #4. Loughborough University
Field #5.
Field #6. Oppression or liberation? Moving beyond binaries and towards a critical realist understanding in the study of religion and gender
Field #7. Scholarly analyses of the relationship between religion and gender address the ‘oppression-liberation’ binary in various ways, from structural perspectives portraying female religious subjectivities as inevitably dominated and oppressed (Jeffreys 2012), to more agentic approaches insisting that female religious subjects exercise choice and agency (see Burke 2012) – even when their behaviour colludes with and reproduces patriarchal norms and gender inequality (e.g., Mahmood 2005; Mack 2003). Along a continuum from structural to agentic approaches, other scholars argue that religious women can simultaneously inhabit both submissive-pious and liberal-feminist subjectivities (Jacobsen 2011; Rinaldo 2014; Zion-Waldoks 2015). Such works demonstrate multiple and intertwined forms of religious women’s agency and complicity that challenge oppositional binary understandings of subordination and liberation (Nyhagen and Halsaa 2016). Scholarly debates about religion and gender also concern the coupling of women’s self-realization with individual and/or with group interests, and whether claims to absolute equal rights for women and men represent universal or particular (and ethnocentric) standards. This paper critically interrogates contemporary scholarly feminist approaches to religion and gender by examining the ways in which they address the relationship between structure and agency. The paper argues that there is a dearth of engagement with broader sociological theories in the field, and that the adoption of a critical realist perspective can enrich the study of religion and gender through its holistic theorization of the relationship between structure and agency.
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Field #1. Theoretical approaches to the social sciences from the field work on religion and spirituality in the global South
Field #2. Carla Bertin
Field #3.
Field #4. EHESS
Field #5.
Field #6. Rencontres inter-religieuses entre Églises pentecôtistes et cultes voduns au Bénin méridional
Field #7. Une grande partie des études saisissent l’étonnante explosion des pentecôtismes à partir des transformations des années 1990. Certes, au Bénin aussi, l’instauration du régime démocratique et la crise socio-économique ont favorisé la prolifération des pentecôtismes, comme dans la plupart des pays d’Afrique subsaharienne. Pourtant, en observant de près la religion vécue dans les espaces ruraux du Bénin méridional, on découvre non pas un pentecôtisme venu d’« en haut » mais « en train de se faire », à partir des pratiques quotidiennes des personnes et au sein du pluralisme religieux local. Interroger l’Église pentecôtiste à la lumière des relations inter-religieuses, en particulier avec les cultes voduns, dévoile une co-construction mutuelle des frontières confessionnelles. D’une part, suivant les rhétoriques d’accusation entre chefs de culte et des Églises, nous retrouvons des registres, employés pour se décrire réciproquement, qui diffèrent des explications académiques (économicistes, etc.). Prendre au sérieux la « religion comparée » des acteurs locaux nous rapproche de la signification sociale du sacré. D’autre part, une autre expérience de la « religion » s’observe lors des situations des rencontres inter-religieuses de la vie quotidienne (le malheur, la réalisation des désirs) : au Bénin méridional, une distinction est faite entre « croire » et « adorer », ce qui permet de s’éloigner de l’idée occidentale de « religion » comme appartenance/croyance. Les relations de proximité et d’intimité participent en outre à produire des situations où les religions se rencontrent et où les Églises pentecôtistes façonnent leur spécificité et légitimité sur le terrain béninois.
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Field #1. New Researchers Forum
Field #2. Chrysa Almpani
Field #3.
Field #4. Department of Theology, Sector of Ethics & Sociology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Field #5.
Field #6. Exploring the dynamics of religion in the international sphere: EU political representatives’ views on the religionization of world politics
Field #7. In the ‘90s, Samuel Huntington argued that in the future new patterns of state conflict will emerge along the boundaries of different cultures and recognized the increased significance of religion, as a prevailing cultural element, in world politics. This theoretical approach gained particular attention after the terrorist attacks of 9/11 from factors advocating their religious and cultural diversification from the West. In modern times, the states emerging in the international system as well as those already established as major powers, present a revised attitude towards the role of religion in international affairs, while a series of traumatic events at global scale have brought into the fore the issue of religious identity as a cause of conflict. With reference to the ways in which religion affects the balance of power at international level, J. Fox argues that the religious factor provides legitimacy to political decisions, influences the leaders' worldviews and shapes the environment of policy-making actors, allows religious conflicts to surpass national borders and presents a strong dialectical relationship with human rights issues. In this context, the aim of this paper is to explore the religious factor dynamics in the international sphere through the analysis of EU political representatives' views on the potential role of religion as a "soft power" agent in foreign policy, diplomacy and peace-building processes. The research interest focuses to shed light on the way they approach the debate about the resurgence of religion in the international arena, their conceptions of religion as a peacekeeper or war trigger component and how the incorporation of religious dimension in EU external policy may affect its relationship with third countries.
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Laísa Dannielle de Lima
Field #3. Itamara Freires de Meneses
Field #4. UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO RIO GRANDE DO NORTE
Field #5.
Field #6. RELIGION, GENERATION AND POLITICS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE MOVEMENT # ELENÃO IN THE 2018 ELECTIONS IN BRAZIL AND THE CONSERVATIVE REACTION
Field #7. Brazilian society has been permeated by a series of events that reveal the significant influence of religion in the political, cultural and economic spheres. A state that presents itself as a layman has shown a significant opening to religious ideas. The last election for the president was marked by a variety of events that show a close relationship between politics and religion. The proposal of the work starts with the analysis of a fact that happened in the presidential race, which was the "# EleNão" movement, created by women, starting from social networks, and winning the streets of the country. A little more than two weeks into the elections, they have raised new questions about this political articulation. The movement has gained worldwide proportions, and thus the emergence of "spokesmen" of the manifesto through networking debates and publication of notes. The work will be developed through qualitative analysis based on Max Weber's understanding sociology in an attempt to understand the actions of the actors involved. In view of the presented scenario, the study draws attention to the fact that appropriations made by the more conservative sectors in relation to the "No It". Political and religious groups used values ​​based on religion in order to delegitimize the construction of the movement. Being that, delegitimizing the movement was a way to weaken the feminist struggles, the leftist candidate and strengthen a conservative wave in the country.
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Field #1. Religion, Gender and Human Rights: The (De)Secularization of Traditional Values
Field #2. Mary Lou Rasmussen
Field #3.
Field #4. The Australian National University
Field #5.
Field #6. Traditional Values and Gender Politics in Australian Education Debates
Field #7. Gender identity is often at the forefront of education debates in Australia, building on international trends towards attempts at desecularization. Anti-Gender politics, as opposed to sexuality, has been a particular focus for conservative politicians. This paper analyses submissions to two highly contested federal parliamentary inquiries specifically associated with religious freedom, both inquiries were completed in 2018. The Ruddock Review on Religious freedom received over 15,000 submissions. When the Ruddock Review report was not released – despite parts of the report being leaked to the media, a parliamentary inquiry into legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students, teachers, and staff was conducted by the Australian senate. Despite both inquiries the Australian parliament has failed to agree to proposed protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender teachers and students. This ensures that the issue will continue to be a source of conflict and controversy in 2019 as the Australian parliament gears up for a federal election in May 2019. The focus of my analysis is on how gender is constituted in submissions to both inquires, which altogether numbered over 16,000. The submissions focused on in this paper are from individuals who are considered to be key players in shaping Australian debates on contestations over religious freedom and sexual freedom. My aim is not to determine the correct position in these debates, but rather, following Judith Butler, to consider the normative frameworks that animate diverse perspectives related to gender politics.
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Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Mateusz Malarczyk
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Warsaw, Institute of Sociology
Field #5.
Field #6. The influence of religion lessons on the religiosity of young people after the confirmation sacrament
Field #7. According to some sociologists, the religious situation in Europe is heading for inexorable secularization, especially among young people (Bruce 2002). Others from sociologists are of the opinion that we are rather in Europe dealing with the phenomenon of "believing without belonging" (Davie 2002), a phrase similarly expressed by Leszek Kołakowski (Kołakowski 2008). The aim of the speech is to answer the question whether and how the confirmation sacrament affected the religiosity of the young people surveyed. In my speech I will present the results of qualitative research. I collected 12 biographical and narrative interviews among young people after accepting the sacrament of Confirmation aged 17-18. Both students from Warsaw and a small village in Poland - Małogoszcz (about 5,500 inhabitants) were examined. A very important factor in the narratives of the respondents were religious lessons conducted in public schools. As a result of the collected research material, the dimensions of religiosity and factors that had a significant impact on shaping the religiosity of the youth were discussed.
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Field #1. Current Concerns in Parish and Congregational Research
Field #2. Alexandre Maltais
Field #3. David Koussens
Field #4. Université de Montréal
Field #5.
Field #6. L’église par-delà son village : Saint-Pierre-Apôtre de Montréal et l’extra-territorialisation de la paroisse en milieu urbain
Field #7. L'accroissement des mobilités individuelles et l'individualisation des modes de vie ont contribué dans les dernières décennies à l'érosion des assises spatiales locales de plusieurs pratiques urbaines. En témoignent l'émergence de nouvelles centralités commerciales périphériques, la multiplication des écoles dites à vocation particulière et, dans le champ religieux, l’apparition de missions et d’églises destinées à des populations souvent minoritaires, aussi spécifiques que géographiquement dispersées : immigrants, LGBTQ, etc. Ces nouvelles structures se superposent et supplantent peu à peu la géographie traditionnelle des paroisses catholiques montréalaises à mesure que la sécularisation accrue de la population québécoise vide celles-ci de leurs fidèles traditionnels. Cette communication s’appuie sur une enquête ethnographique de terrain réalisée en deux temps (2006-2007, puis 2017-2018) dans une paroisse catholique du centre de Montréal fréquentée majoritairement par une population homosexuelle. À partir de 40 entrevues semi-directives et d’une analyse de sources documentaires et d’archives issues de la paroisse, elle interroge les nouveaux modes de spécialisation et de spatialisation de l’offre religieuse catholique en ville, mettant en rapport le parcours des croyants et les logiques institutionnelles propres à l'Église d'aujourd'hui. Elle montre ainsi que l’Église autrefois omniprésente et structurante dans la ville doit « refaire sa place » dans le contexte de son déclin matériel et symbolique, ce qui permet à certaines communautés autrefois invisibles de prendre leur place dans la cité. Ce faisant, elle pose un regard nouveau sur la nature élective et réfléchie de la pratique paroissiale contemporaine – tant religieuse que communautaire.
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Field #1. Pope Francis, Religious Authority and the Media
Field #2. Rita Marchetti
Field #3. Susanna Pagiotti
Field #4. Università di Perugia
Field #5.
Field #6. The newsworthiness of the Catholic Church representatives in Italian newspapers
Field #7. Processes of disintermediation allow new actors to intervene in the public debate becoming producers of public arguments. Using some characteristics of the “hybrid” media system (Chadwick, 2013) and through the strategic use of digital social platforms, those new actors avoid the constraints of mainstream media. Consequently, complex institutions – such as the Catholic Church – have several communication channels or/and spokespersons. At the same time, the coverage of the Catholic Church depends on newsworthiness criteria (Gans, 1979, 2011). The hypotheses of this paper are: 1) in spite of the Pope’s greater visibility, not only the highest hierarchical levels of the Catholic Church attract media attention, but also its other members; 2) the coverage of the different actors depends on newsworthiness criteria. The aim of this work is to verify who are the main Church representatives covered by news outlets (only the highest levels of the ecclesial hierarchy?) and the reasons behind such journalistic narration. The paper proposes an automated content analyses (through QDA Miner/WordStat) of 42,413 news articles related to Catholic Church in the 15 Italian main national newspapers (print press, websites, online only), from the 1st of March 2017 to the 28th of February 2018. Results confirm that newspapers do not cover only the Pope but also the low levels of religious hierarchy (e.g. parish priests). Religious actors’ coverage depends, not only on their visibility, but also on the issues on which they intervene and on the media they choose.
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Slavica Jakelic
Field #3.
Field #4. Valparaiso University
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion and Politics in the Case of Croatia: Catholicism, Nationalism, and the Problem of Pluralism
Field #7. In this paper, I will consider the relationship between religion and politics in one of the smallest and most religious European nations, Croatia, by looking at “collectivistic Catholicisms.” On the one hand, I will explore the type of collectivistic Catholicism that is closely linked to the Croatian national identity, rejects the cultural and moral pluralism of modernity but ends up espousing one of modernity's aspects, its homogenizing impulse. On the other hand, I will discuss the type of collectivistic Catholicism that is particularist, even exclusivist in character by virtue of being associated with the Croatian national identity. Yet, in remaining open toward Islam, this collectivistic Catholicism is also open to one mode of religious and cultural pluralism. Through a juxtaposition of these two types of collectivistic Catholicisms—one that advocates homogeneity, the other more open to differences—I want to make a two-fold argument. First, I want to expose yet another subtraction story about religion and modernity—to problematize the commonly accepted notion that, when religion is in the domain of nationalism, it loses agency because it has to give in to the powers of the modern secular. Second, I want to argue that what is most often at stake in the conversations about religion and nationalism is the question of pluralism. Countering the usual assumptions about collectivistic religions as anti-pluralist, I want to propose they sometimes gesture toward a particular ideal of pluralism—the one in which the encounters with different others do not diminish the differences but rather sustain them.
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Field #1. Religion, Gender and Human Rights: The (De)Secularization of Traditional Values
Field #2. Lucian Cirlan
Field #3.
Field #4. Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (PSL-Sorbonne)
Field #5.
Field #6. "Mariage pour nous". Religious mobilization for traditional agenda in Romania
Field #7. In spite of the on-going secularization process of the Romanian society, there have been several significant religious manifestations that occurred in the public agenda. The main agenda of the Christian conservative associations is focusing on moral and sexual issues, like abortion, same-sex marriage and traditional values, challenging the current legal framework. For example, a civic initiative of the Coalition for Family (CpF) managed to collect more than three millions signatures, in order to organize a referendum and amend the Constitution, stating that the only version of marriage is the traditional one. In this presentation, I will analyze the relation between religion, politics and traditional values highlighting the emergence of the “Christian” civil society and its sources of mobilization and civic engagement in Romania. I argue that the main religious actor, the Romanian Orthodox Church, is shifting from the traditional alliance with the political power towards the mobilization of its confessional NGOs, in order to maintain the privileged position within the society. Therefore, this process of believers’ “democratization” and political participation aiming constitutional reform is challenging the democratic values of the Romanian society and State secularity.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Contemporary Religiosities and Sociological Diagnoses in the West
Field #2. Irene Becci
Field #3.
Field #4. Lausanne of University
Field #5.
Field #6. Urban parks as religious heterotopies
Field #7. Under certain conditions, urban parks can be conceptualized as heterotopic social spaces (M. Foucault) within modern societies. Urban parks indeed symbolize an imaginary of nature for urban dwellers and are exposed to contesting secular and religious appropriations. Starting from empirical observations and conceptual reflections within the framework of two studies, one on ecological activism in two French-Speaking Swiss cities and one on urban religious diversity in the city of Potsdam, in Germany, this presentation focuses on religious practices taking place in urban parks. Be it at festivals, during collective meetings on regular basis or individually, even solitary action, contemporary spirituality takes indeed often practically place in urban parks. The presentation discusses the symbolic importance of such emplacements as well as the discourses accompanying the practices. In this regard, the way spirituality, society and nature is referred to, varies hugely and reflects broader developments of contemporary social change be it in terms of diversification and globalization as well as a longing for visible but non-surveilled niches.
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Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Diana Thomaz
Field #3.
Field #4. Wilfrid Laurier University
Field #5.
Field #6. Pentecostalism and the Urban Politics of Rio de Janeiro
Field #7. In 2016, a former bishop of the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (UCKG), Marcelo Crivella, was elected mayor of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the first time in Brazilian politics, a politician whose career was built on his identity as a straight-laced Pentecostal leader won an election to an executive position—not least, the mayorship of the country’s second-largest city and hedonistic tourist destination. While Brazil remains predominantly Catholic, Pentecostal churches have expanded dramatically since the 1980s, attracting followers mostly in the poorest urban areas and gaining a disproportionate influence in the country’s National Congress. However, Crivella’s 2016 municipal victory (after losing five previous elections) was a landmark in the trajectory of Pentecostalism’s rise. It inaugurated a new phase in the relationship between Rio’s urban politics and religion, marked by, among other things, a concern that the interests of a morally conservative minority group could be imposed on an extraordinarily diverse metropolis. By analyzing the political rise of Crivella and his key role in the emergence of the powerful UCKG, this paper shows how he not only relied on the church’s penetration among the urban poor for political ends, but was also able to expand his appeal to a broader constituency and capitalize on the widespread antiestablishment sentiment of the 2016 political crisis, thereby further extending Pentecostalism’s political influence in Brazil. Striving to convey an image of moderation, Crivella has since struggled to prove to opponents and sceptics that his is not a government of and for Pentecostals.
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Petr Haas
Field #3.
Field #4. FSV UK
Field #5.
Field #6. Media representations of restitutions of church properties and separation of church and state
Field #7. Nature of the relationship between state, church and civil society is since 1990 permanently present theme in the Czech public debate. After the fall of the communist regime, the question of the restitutions of church properties have risen. After more than 20 years, this debate led to adoption of the Church Property Restitution Law (428\2012), but the majority of the nation is not willing to return the properties to the churches. The public debate created a platform for rich reflection of the purpose of the churches in the life of the society as well as for the reflection of transformation of material, cultural and moral relationships between the church and state. With the use of discourse analysis we describe the types of argumentation about restitutions and their dialogical networks in the Czech public debate. The church discourse played extensively with the argument of (postcommunist) justice. On the secular side the main argument was more practical – the restitutions presented a possibility how to start the process of separation of the church and state and to stop the state financing of the churches in this way. To answer these questions we analyzed several mainstream Czech newspapers, that represent both left and right wing of the political spectrum, Czech church weekly periodical and transcripts of parliamentary debates.
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Field #1. Religion and women’s public participation
Field #2. Rosa Martinez Cuadros
Field #3.
Field #4. ISOR- Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Field #5.
Field #6. Islamic feminism and women’s public participation: strategies, perspectives and tensions through the case of Muslim women in Barcelona
Field #7. In recent years, Muslim women have become more visible in the public space through their involvement in political and social participation in European contexts. Their religious identity as muslims has become a relevant strategy that justifies and legitimises the importance of their public presence. In that context, ‘Islamic feminism’ is an emerging concept used to analyse Muslim women’s movements and their specificity or opposition against other type of feminisms, such as ‘secular feminism’ or ‘western feminism’. At the same time, it is a highly contested concept by different theoretical perspectives which highlight the complexities of the term and challenges its viability. In the first part of this paper, I present a review of ‘Islamic Feminism’ trying to answer questions such as: How should Islamic feminism be defined? Which are its main theoretical perspectives and issues? Is it a useful analytical tool to understand specific movements and struggles of Muslim Women? In the second part, I analyse this theoretical discussion within the specific case of Muslim women that undertake social and political participation in Barcelona. Through this research, based on observations and interviews, I argue that the theoretical tension is present in women’s discourses and justifications of their public participation. On one hand, this tension is evident in some women’s resistance of identifying as ‘Islamic feminists’. On the other hand, those women who claim to be ‘Islamic feminist’ express a need to clarify their interpretation of the concept before expressing this identification.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. New Researchers Forum
Field #2. Aurelia Ubeda Puigdomenech
Field #3.
Field #4. University of York
Field #5.
Field #6. Breaking the Mould: Negotiating Femininity through the Virgin Mary
Field #7. This paper points to ways in which the Virgin Mary is used in secular artwork to challenge traditional understandings of femininity and gender expectations. When present in secular images, the Virgin Mary is often used as a tool with which to engage in social and political comment (Gaspar and Lopez, 2011; Coleman and Fernandes-Dias, 2008), and such non-devotional depictions of Mary cannot be divorced from the historical role her images have had in conveying and reinforcing meanings of femininity and gender expectations (Warner, 1976). Using an Arts-Based-Research approach, I collaborate with artists to explore what femininities surface when creating secular images of the Virgin Mary. Through this exploration the artists have created secular images of Mary, which show contrasting views of the Mary in relation to femininity: she can be liberating and inspiring, as well as constrictive and reductive. Reflecting on the original artwork created and the interviews with the artists, this paper suggests how the image of the Virgin Mary becomes a site of negotiation for the artists’ individual understandings of femininity, their political views, and their sentiments towards religion. How did the artists engage with traditional religious Marian imagery to convey a personal view of femininity that often challenges the conventional understandings of femininity and womanhood? How do the political and the personal intertwine in these secular images of Mary? And how does the artist’s (non)religious identity affect how they navigate depicting the religious icon of the Virgin Mary from a secular perspective?
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Field #1. The politics of religious diversity: the case of chaplaincy
Field #2. Stephen Reid
Field #3.
Field #4. Christian Research Association & National Centre for Pastoral Research
Field #5.
Field #6. Funding the honorary chaplain: Exploring the possibilities of public funding for sports chaplaincy in Australia
Field #7. Australians love sport. Much has been written about how this love affair has shaped the national identity. It has been argued that Australians regard sport as sacred to their way of life, offering an alternative ‘religion’ which provides identity, meaning and belonging. Some Christian churches in Australia have recognised the potential of sport to connect with local communities. One such example is the appointment of Christian chaplains to sporting clubs. There are currently more than 700 chaplains throughout Australia, serving in a diversity of sporting clubs, and at various levels. Training and placement of chaplains is overseen by Sports Chaplaincy Australia (SCA), a non-denominational Christian organisation which has a vision to place a chaplain in every sporting club in Australia. The vast majority of chaplains appointed serve in an honorary capacity, an intentional model of ministry originally envisaged when the first chaplains were appointed to national sporting teams in the mid-1980s. However, even as sports chaplaincy has expanded, SCA has continued to generate its own funding from members, private organisations and individuals. Drawing on interviews and surveys conducted with members of sporting clubs and with sports chaplains, I will examine the advantages and disadvantages of private funding for sports chaplaincy and explore whether utilising public funding is a future possibility or whether it may undermine its own ministry.
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Field #1. The politics of religious diversity: the case of chaplaincy
Field #2. Isabelle Kostecki
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Montréal
Field #5.
Field #6. (Re)inventing End-of-life Rituals: Spiritual Caregivers Respond to Religious Diversity in Quebec
Field #7. In the early 2010’s, the health authorities of Quebec adopted the notion of spirituality in precedence over religion and promoted spiritual care as a service provided to the population by medical institutions. This shift brought chaplaincies to adopt a non-confessional status and transformed chaplains and pastoral counselors into intervenants en soins spirituels. This status enables their integration as clinical team members while requiring they adopt “neutral” spiritual counselling models in order to support patients within their own religious or spiritual background. In a plural context, spiritual caregivers meet significant religious diversity in terms of the various traditions represented among their patients as well as of the singularity of personal belief systems. Moreover, these spiritual agents are faced with important challenges when addressing the divergent religious/spiritual needs of patients and their families, particularly in the context of dying. If the strategies of spiritual care providers for attending to religious diversity are documented, little research addresses primarily the practice of end-of-life rituals and the expertise required to ritualize death in plural social contexts. Drawing from an ongoing ethnographic research among spiritual caregivers in Quebec, I will present the strategies that they deploy to reinvent end-of-life rituals at the secular age. It appears that in dealing with heterogeneous religiosity, these agents of change are reflexively involved in experimenting with ritual approaches that draw from a wide array of disciplines and traditions (religious and secular). Remarkably, despite their idiosyncrasies, they tend to converge towards what may be termed tentatively an emerging secular ritual praxis.
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Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Kristina KOVALSKAYA
Field #3.
Field #4. PSL
Field #5.
Field #6. Recomposition des acteurs de la laïcité dans un espace post-athéiste
Field #7. Dans le cadre de la session sur les acteurs de la laïcité, je propose une étude du cas russe postsoviétique exploité dans ma thèse de doctorat en cours de rédaction. La notion de laïcité est problématique dans cet espace qui a connu une sécularisation forcée et l’idéologie de l’athéisme scientifique. Néanmoins, ce terme est largement utilisé avant et après la chute de l’URSS dans le discours public, ainsi que dans les textes législatifs. L’emploi de la notion de laïcité a évolué depuis 1991. Si, dans les années 1990, les législateurs et les intellectuels publics associent cette notion à la modernisation démocratique, on assiste, dans les années 2000, à un tournant vers les notions de tradition et de spiritualité, celui-ci étant souvent interprété comme désécularisation. L’analyse des débats sur la laïcité en Russie depuis 1991, montre que les acteurs de la laïcité sont paradoxalement répartis dans l’espace social. Ainsi, on trouve parmi les défenseurs de la laïcité,des acteurs qui y sont traditionnellement opposés comme des anciens spécialistes en athéisme scientifique, rebaptisés sociologues des religions, ou des représentants des minorités religieuses, telles que les salafistes ou les évangélistes. Par opposition, des acteurs s’inscrivant dans un paradigme normatif, celui des « valeurs traditionnelles » et de la « spiritualité », critiquent la laïcité. Cette orientation est soutenue par des représentants de religions officiellement reconnues comme « traditionnelles » (par exemple l’Eglise orthodoxe russe et les musulmans hanafites, shaféites et soufi), ainsi que par des intellectuels pro-orthodoxes et des agents publics des cultes.
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Field #1. Politics and economics of monasticism
Field #2. Marek Liška
Field #3.
Field #4. Faculty of social sciences, Charles University of Prague
Field #5.
Field #6. New monastic community as an answer to secularization
Field #7. In my contribution, I would like to present a case study of Catholic charismatic community of so-called „new monasticism“. Based on my ethnographical and au-toethnografical data I would like to analyse the community as both an attempt of a new interpretation of monastic tradition and an attempt to translate monastic tradi-tion to the modern world. Originally from France, now based in small suburban area near Prague the community tries to establish themselves within local society and church institutions and build relationship with both lay people and believers in the city. What are their offers to the „world“ distributed during public events and weekend seminars and how do they work with Ignacian and charismatic spirituali-ty? How do people in monastery construct a „catholic body“ and „sacred every-dayness“? How do they reinterpret monastic technics and traditions? Where does their attractiveness lay for young people from parishes all over the country? How do they replace and rebuild catholic liturgy and rituals? I argue that democratiza-tion of the utopian projects of monasteries and opening of traditional monastic techniques builds unique position of Christianity in local social environment as well as in local church.
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Field #1. The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe
Field #2. Alana Souza
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco - UFPE
Field #5.
Field #6. “He’s Jewish, that’s so beautiful”: a study of Jewish materiality at UCKG’s travel to Temple of Solomon
Field #7. This work proposes an analysis of the use of Jewish material elements by the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God. In July 2014, the UCKG opened the Temple of Solomon, a replica of the bible’s famous temple, including an Ark of the Covenant, menorahs and assistants dressed as Levites. During the opening ceremony Edir Macedo, UCKG~s founder, wore a tallit and a kippah. During fieldwork in a UCKG Temple in Brazil, I have observed the importance that members attribute to visit to that temple. This article is based on a ‘pilgrimage’ to the Temple of Solomon, and in my broader ethnography within that church. Although the Temple of Solomon itself, and Macedo’s clothing during its opening, are the most famous elements of the Philo-Semitism at UCKG, these are not isolated objects in themselves. This research aims to show how is it possible to find different forms of Jewish materiality, from menorahs in UCKG’s temples to members wearing Star of David necklaces, and to discuss their meanings for believers. These material practices have important moral and ethical implications (Fassin, 2012; Lambek, 2015). One of my informants told me after seeing a man with a kippah “Oh, he’s Jewish, that’s so beautiful”. These Jewish material objects and forms of philo-semitism are part of UCKG~s public semiotics (Keane, 2008), but also link to their notions of transcendence. Understanding this process is the ultimate goal of this research.
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Field #1. Religious configurations and transformation in Latin America
Field #2. Daniela Plata
Field #3.
Field #4. Université de Antioquia
Field #5.
Field #6. Acteurs religieux et significations de paix
Field #7. Le plébiscite et l'approbation de l'accord de paix entre le gouvernement colombien et les FARC-EP ont représenté un moment de conjoncture qui a provoqué un débat public intense dirigé par divers secteurs de la société colombienne. Parmi eux était le religieux, composé par des organisations, des églises et des acteurs politiques spécifiques qu’ont construit différentes significations sur la paix. D’autre part, ce sont les réseaux sociaux dont la population a exprimé ses opinions sur la transition et la fin du conflit armée. Tout ça a composé un grand champ de dispute pour la signification et le contrôle culturel de l'information, dans ce cas, autour de la paix. Ce pourquoi cette communication cherche retracer la diversité des discours que les différents acteurs religieux ont défendus. Egalement on veut comprendre leurs cadres de référence, d’interactions symboliques, d’interprétations et d’exercices de pouvoir qui se sont déroulés dans le web 2.0. Donc, au sein de la diversité du spectre religieux, plusieurs positions ont apparu. D’une part, des positions plus conservatrices, alliés a certains partis politiques de droit. D’autre part, des positions plus flexibles et libérales, et enfin, des opinions dites « neutres ». Tout cela formait un ensemble d'interprétations à partir d’un même message chrétien ou la même doctrine religieuse. Elle exprime le dynamisme des religions face aux circonstances politiques et aussi, qu’elles n’ont pas un discours politique uniforme. Enfin, on veut essayer d’expliquer : a. les définitions du paix faite par des différents acteurs (catholiques, protestantes et pentecôtistes) b. Les motivations des différents discours sur la paix c. La relation entre discours religieux et discours politique.
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Field #1. Social Movements, Rebellions and Revolutions through Religious Contention
Field #2. Warren Goldstein
Field #3.
Field #4. Center of Critical Research on Religion
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion, Rebellion, and Revolution: A Historical and Cultural Comparison
Field #7. The first political revolution was the English Revolution, otherwise known as the Puritan Revolution. Historically, religion has not only been a tool of domination and also an instrument of social change. This paper will look at a few different cases in which religion has been intertwined which movements for social change. It shall begin with the emergence of messianism in the context of ancient Judea and the historical context under which it arose. It shall then look at some of the most prominent historical cases in which radical messianic, millenarian, eschatological, and utopian movements have reappeared. Spanning different historical epochs, cultures, and societies around the globe, this paper will also discuss the Christian heretical sects leading up to the Reformation; Thomas Münzer and the Anabaptists during the German Peasant Wars; utopian and millenarian sects during the English Civil War; Hong Xiuquan and the Taiping Rebellion; and the Imam Khomeini and the Iranian Revolution. It shall examine commonalities as well as differences between these religious movements assessing the risks and rewards of the intermixture of religion and politics.
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Field #1. The Public Role of Religion
Field #2. Andrezza Medeiros
Field #3.
Field #4. Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte
Field #5.
Field #6. SCIENCE, ETHICS AND SPIRITUALITY: POLITICAL DIMENSIONS
Field #7. All living beings are members of ecological communities linked to one another in a network of interdependencies. Capra states that the moment this deep ecological awareness becomes part of our everyday consciousness, a new ethics system will emerge. Such ecological ethics are urgent today, especially in science, since most of what scientists are doing is not in the sense of promoting and preserving life but destroying it. With physicists creating weapons systems that threaten to sweep the life of the planet, chemicals polluting the environment, biologists creating new and unknown microorganisms without knowing the consequences, psychologists and other scientists torturing animals in the name of scientific progress. In the light of this, we bring the idea that the subject is like an ethical "self" in relation to itself, and therefore seen as transformable, modifiable: it is a subject that is constructed, that gives itself rules of existence and conduct. Ethics consists here of directing one's own reflective subjectivity towards itself, seeking ways to reinvent itself, to elaborate one's own life, including the political dimension. Self-care corresponds to an ethical stance before the world in which the individual, before acting on it, turns to himself reflexively, acting upon himself and then upon the world. The attitude towards you corresponds to a care with one's own life in both its biological and subjective sense. This awareness of self and of the other is considered, in this work, as spirituality. We opted for a bibliographical methodological perspective.
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Field #1. Current Concerns in Parish and Congregational Research
Field #2. Trudy Dantis
Field #3.
Field #4. ACBC National Centre for Pastoral Research
Field #5.
Field #6. Preliminary Findings from Stage I of the Journey to Plenary Council in Australia
Field #7. In response to the changing context of Australian society and the significant effects wrought by the Royal Commission into Institutional Response to Child Sexual Abuse, the Australian Catholic Bishops announced their decision to hold a Plenary Council in 2020. The intent of this historic Council will be to discuss and legislate on a wide range of issues, including matters of faith, morals and discipline. In preparation for the 2020 Council, a three-year project called “Journey to Plenary Council 2018-2020” was developed. Stage One of this journey involved the collection of submissions from individual Australians and groups following a process of listening and dialogue as they explored how they might answer the main question: What do you think God is asking of us in Australia? This paper will examine the research process that was used for the collection of national submissions. It will explore some of the themes that emerged from the data that have helped build the framework for ongoing dialogue on the future of the Catholic Church in Australia.
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Field #1. Seeking the Others: exploring transcultural religious expansion from/to/across Latin America
Field #2. Paulo Pinto
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidade Federal Fluminense
Field #5.
Field #6. Pilgrimages and Transnational Religious Imagination in the Muslim Communities in Brazil
Field #7. Brazil has a large Muslim population which can be estimated between 100,000 and 200,000 members, who are concentrated in the states of São Paulo, Paraná and Rio de Janeiro. Their religious life is organized around mosques, Islamic associations and a few Sufi communities, which were created since the second and third decades of the twentieth century, when most Muslim immigrants came from Syria, Lebanon and Palestine, and is also organized along sectarian lines, with Sunni, Shii, Druze and ‘Alawi religious institutions gathering the followers of each tradition. I will analyze in this paper the practices and discourses that are enticed by pilgrimages performed by Muslim from Brazil. The analysis will show how these practices and discourses lead to the reconfiguration of the religious identities of the Brazilian Muslims within the framework of the transnational religious imaginations that were created through pilgrimage. I will also focus on how pilgrimage creates circuits of religious authority and prestige that allow transnational codifications of Islam to enter and be appropriated by the local Muslim communities in Brazil, inscribing them in the religious landscape of globalized Islam. The data analyzed here were collected in various periods of ethnographic fieldwork in the Muslim communities of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Curitiba and Foz do Iguaçu since 2003, including an ethnographic fieldwork of the groups of pilgrims in the ziyara al-‘arbaiyyn, from São Paulo to Iraq and Iran, in 2013.
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Field #1. Religion towards Migration
Field #2. Valentina Pereira
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidad Católica del Uruguay
Field #5.
Field #6. Migration and spirituality: the chase of peruvian immigrants in Montevideo and Córdoba
Field #7. In this paper we explore the various and diverse ways in which peruvian immigrants in Montevideo (Uruguay) and Córdoba (Argentina) find a way to live, practice, and connect with the transcendence in everyday life. We examine this procces of negotation and creativity considering the dispar ways of living of these collective of immigrants in these cities.
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Field #1. Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?
Field #2. Irina Stahl
Field #3.
Field #4. Institute of Sociology, Romanian Academy
Field #5.
Field #6. Henri H. Stahl and the village community theory based on a diffuse tradition
Field #7. Henri H. Stahl, prominent member of the Romanian school of sociology between the two World Wars was dismissed from his position at the university by the Communists and narrowly escaped imprisonment. Mainly known for his studies on the Romanian village communities, he has not yet received the international recognition that he deserves. Having spent 40 years under Communist rule, he was elected to membership in the Romanian Academy in 1990, after the fall of Communist rule. This late recognition, nevertheless failed to restore his reputation as a leading scholar in sociology. In 1926, Stahl accompanied Gusti, the leader of what later was known as the Sociological School of Bucharest, in one of his first monographic campaigns. Stahl developed his own theory on the evolution of the Romanian village community, while perfecting the scientific methodology for its study. He also developed a particular interest in folk culture and spirituality and entered into polemics with the philosopher Lucian Blaga, and later, with Mircea Eliade, the religion historian. Towards the end of his life he synthetised his thoughts in Critical essays on the Romanian folk culture (1983), in which he finalized his theory of the village community based on diffuse tradition. Stahl’s book, articles and unpublished materials from the family archive will be discussed regarding his theory of the transmission of culture and spirituality within an oral society, and its implications concerning the variety of Romanian Orthodox traditions in the post-communist society.
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Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Karine Pessôa
Field #3. Wânia Mesquita
Field #4. Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro
Field #5.
Field #6. Evangelical Families and Homosexuality: Conflicts and Transitions in the Private Sphere
Field #7. The present work proposes to analyze and debate a few considerations about the relationship between mothers and fathers and their sons and daughters related to the discovery of the homosexuality, based on interviews with gays and lesbians, sons and daughters raised by evangelic families. Considering the general representations in the Brazilian evangelical everyday life speech about homosexuality and the homosexual individual, we will present the relation between these representations and the behavior of the families of the interviewers, the changes and permanences within the family relationship, and at the same time emphasize the presence of an affective expectation towards to the family. Understanding homosexuality as a break in the parental expectation attributed to a son or daughter, we observe the revelation of sexuality as the generator of a process of search for recognition in the private sphere, analyzing the aforementioned families.
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. Marie-Eve Larivière
Field #3.
Field #4. Université d'Ottawa
Field #5.
Field #6. Les femmes et le catholicisme : Comprendre les nouvelles dynamiques religieuses au Québec
Field #7. Les recherches récentes sur le catholicisme québécois suggèrent une transformation des dynamiques religieuses où l’appartenance catholique comme référent identitaire, si elle décline, s’articule désormais à de nouvelles logiques d’un rapport individualisé au religieux où croyances, appartenance et pratiques ne vont plus de pair. Si ce phénomène croît en importance avec chaque génération, on connaît encore peu les particularités et les variations de ce nouveau rapport en fonction du genre. Cependant, les études sur la question de la religion et du genre montrent que ce dernier influence à la fois les formes de religiosité des individus, le rapport développé envers la religion et l’engagement envers l’institution et la communauté religieuse. De plus, les recherches sur l’engagement social des Québécois soulignent d’importantes différences en termes pratiques selon le genre, l’âge et le parcours de vie. La présente étude s’intéresse donc ici aux nouvelles logiques qui caractérisent le rapport des femmes québécoises au catholicisme, notamment à travers leur engagement auprès de l’institution et de leur communauté, mais également par les nouvelles formes de religiosité qu’elles présentent. À partir d’entretiens effectués auprès d’hommes et de femmes catholiques de différentes générations, nous nous intéressons ici à retracer les effets des transformations sociales et culturelles de la société québécoise sur le catholicisme. Nous explorons plus précisément les particularités du rapport de plus en plus individualisé au religieux des Québécois en fonction du genre.
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Field #1. The Actors of Secularism : Comparing and Contextualizing Positionings
Field #2. Bernard Gagnon
Field #3. Bernard Gagnon
Field #4. Université du Québec à Rimouski
Field #5.
Field #6. Charles Taylor et le débat sur la laïcité au Québec et au Canada
Field #7. Charles Taylor a développé une position originale sur la laïcité qui est souvent mal comprise dans le débat public. Parfois associée à la vision du pluralisme libéral, parfois associée à l’idée d’une diversité religieuse sans frontière, sa conception se retrouve critiquée sur plusieurs fronts : elle serait trop laxiste vis-à-vis des pratiques religieuses traditionnelles ou fondamentalistes, elle ne chercherait qu’à voiler ou dissimuler les profondes croyances religieuses de Taylor ou, encore, elle serait une atteinte au principe de la neutralité religieuse de l’État. Taylor, lui-même, n’a pas facilité la réception publique de sa pensée. Il est dernièrement sorti publiquement pour dénoncer l’une des propositions qu’il avait lui-même officiellement soutenues en matière de la laïcité, soit l’interdiction du port de signes religieux par les officiers publics en position d’autorité (juges, gardiens de prison, policiers). Quiconque connaît les travaux de Taylor ne fut pas surpris de ce changement (c’est l’inverse qui était surprenant), mais elle a laissé plus d’un confus parmi les acteurs du débat public. Dans cette communication, je propose d’analyser les différentes positions publiques de Charles Taylor au sujet de la laïcité en cherchant à rechercher leur cohérence et à poser les ponts entre ses prises de position et ses réflexions philosophiques et politiques sur la laïcité.
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Field #1. RELIGIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Field #2. Françoise Paradis-Simpson
Field #3. Françoise Simpson
Field #4. Université Laval
Field #5.
Field #6. Diversité religieuse en contexte démocratique : les droits de l’homme en question
Field #7. Il est possible de distinguer deux manières d’appréhender les droits de l’homme. Cette distinction mène à deux visions de la place de la religion dans la société. Selon une première version, les droits de l’homme sont pensés en termes de modalités législatives qui peuvent varier d’un contexte social à l’autre. Ils sont l’objet de débats interprétatifs, mais également pratiques. C’est notamment le cas lorsqu’on discute la forme que doit prendre la laïcité pour en arriver à un certain équilibre entre droits individuels et collectifs. Selon une seconde version, les droits de l’homme représentent des traits caractéristiques fondamentaux de l’organisation démocratique de la société. Sous cet angle, la justesse des modalités législatives auxquelles ils donnent lieu dépend davantage de la correspondance des mécanismes avec ces derniers, que d’idéaux moraux dont l’interprétation demeure toujours ouverte dans ce contexte où aucune doctrine compréhensive (religieuse ou séculière) ne peut s’approprier la détermination collective ni fixer la limite entre le bon citoyen et son ennemi. Dans cette communication, je soutiendrai que cette seconde version représente un outil critique pour des modalités législatives qui permettent la formation d’un discours collectif qui prenne en compte l’ensemble des acteurs tous considérés légitimes dans la sphère publique. Selon cette perspective, les religions représentent des organismes favorisant l’inscription de certaines identités dans le discours collectif.
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Field #1. Religious authority, political participation, and the Internet
Field #2. Sana Patel
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Ottawa
Field #5.
Field #6. Understanding North American Muslim Millennials, Online Religious Authority and Hybrid Media Spaces
Field #7. In today’s digital age, social media plays a large role in shaping and forming religious identities. It allows young Muslims to like and follow certain Imams online or simply to follow the posts of Muslim bloggers or influencers. This has also caused a shift in religious authority from traditional offline spaces to new virtual spaces such as social media. Imams who used to preach in offline spaces have adapted to apps such as Twitter and Snapchat. This paper will discuss the concept of lived religion, its significance in understanding Muslim millennials and the shift is religious authority. It will relate the relationship between the three to my doctoral research, which examines Reviving the Islamic Spirit (RIS) conference (held annually in Toronto) as a hybrid media space that brings together online personalities at an offline event, acting as an intersection and meeting place.
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Field #1. Social Theory and Religion 2
Field #2. Vyacheslav Karpov
Field #3.
Field #4. Western Michigan University
Field #5.
Field #6. Desecularization: thoeretical and conceptual clarifications
Field #7. Peter Berger (1999) introduced the concept of desecularization without clearly defining it or specifying its place in theoretical debates surrounding secularization. Since then, research on religious resurgences in modern societies has picked up considerably. However, serious misgivings remain in the literature concerning the meaning, theoretical status, and empirical applicability of the concept of desecularization. Specifically, the idea of desecularization has been interpreted as (1) a replacement for the grand narrative of secularization; (2) as something that is in a zero-sum-game relationship with secularization; (2) as indistinct from general vitality of religion or religious growth; (3) as synonymic with (re)sacralization, and therefore superfluous; (4) as the rise of a ‘post-secular’ society; and (5) as yet another self-propelled modern juggernaut. This paper addresses the aforesaid misgivings and expands the understanding of the nature and limits of desecularization as a type of social change in which religions reassert a degree of societal influence in reaction to previous and/or co-occurring secularizations. Furthermore, the paper approaches desecularization(s) from an agency-focused perspective as project(s) and process(es) of change that result from the project(s). In this context, the paper explains the advantages of a pluralistic approach to multiple and conflicting desecularizations in the context of globalization.
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Field #1. Social Movements, Rebellions and Revolutions through Religious Contention
Field #2. Jean-Pierre Reed
Field #3.
Field #4. Southern Illinois University
Field #5.
Field #6. Affinities between Sandinismo and Religious Idioms in the Nicaraguan Revolution
Field #7. The history of the Nicaraguan revolution has received considerable analytical attention. Typically, the successful overthrow of the Somoza regime in the late 1970s is associated with the FSLN, a Marxist / socialist inspired vanguard group. While the role Christians played in the revolution is often acknowledged a significant one, in part because many Sandinista cadres were Christian revolutionaries, little attention has been paid to the degree to which Sandinismo, as a unique ideology of socialism, shares affinities with religious idioms. This paper sets out to explore the religious appeal of Sandinismo as a socialist ideology. Sandinismo-as-socialism, I argue, appealed to would be Christian revolutionaries because of their religious predispositions. Among other, both had in common the idioms of brotherhood, equality, justice, and liberation. This idiomatic affinity made it possible for would be Christian revolutionaries to find themselves in Sandinismo as Christians.
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Field #1. New Researchers Forum
Field #2. Ruth Amwe
Field #3.
Field #4. Princeton Theological Seminary
Field #5.
Field #6. “Bring Back Our Girls!”: Nigerian Women and African Religions in Civil Protest
Field #7. On the 14th of April 2014, Nigeria awoke to the news of the kidnap of 276 school girls in the small town of Chibok in Northern Nigeria. This news led to the conception of one of the biggest protests organized by Nigerian women in the 21st century, The Bring Back Our Girls Movement. In the era of Black Lives Matter, Women’s March, Me Too Movement and Comfort Women March, this movement has garnered support from world leaders, celebrities and public office holders in various countries of the world. The movement has sustained its relevance by employing mass social media usage and recently marked the 4years anniversary of the 112 girls still in captivity with renewed zeal to keep protesting. Following the proliferation of religiously motivated civil and terrorist unrest in Nigeria, women have suffered various forms of human rights violation including rape, kidnap, assault, torture and murder. My research will examine how women engage public discourse through civil protest in north-central Nigeria. It will engage the Bring Back Our Girls Movement as a medium of interrogating the religious motivation for protests. This research will investigate the indigenous theologies of resistance and justice within womanist theologies. I also seek to examine the diasporic elements of these movement as sustained by women among the new African diasporic populace. Thus, my work will engage unexplored aspects of gender, social theory, cultural studies and religion within the African public sphere. KEYWORDS Gender, African Religions, Civil Protest, Social media, Bring Back Our Girls Movement.
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Field #1. Seeking the Others: exploring transcultural religious expansion from/to/across Latin America
Field #2. silvia montenegro
Field #3.
Field #4. CONICET
Field #5.
Field #6. Religion and refugee. The role of faith based organization in the assistance of syrian refugees in Argentina.
Field #7. In October 2014, the government headed by Cristina Kirchner had put into force the Syria Program (Programa Siria), an initiative enabling access to a humanitarian visa for people of Syrian nationality and their families, as well as for people of Palestinian nationality who usually live in Syria or would have lived there receiving assistance by the UNRWA. Today, faith based organization are actively involved in this policy implementation. Based on ethnographic approach, this paper attempts to show how the Evangelical and Catholic religious imagination try to integrate the Otherness of refugees.
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Field #1. Social Movements, Rebellions and Revolutions through Religious Contention
Field #2. C. Travis Webb
Field #3.
Field #4. CultureHum Foundation
Field #5.
Field #6. Otherworldly Protest Movements
Field #7. One of the most undertheorized areas in the study of religion is the role of otherworldliness in the formation of modern nation-states and other—apparently secular—trans-local, supra-kin communities. Benedict Anderson famously called these polities “imagined communities.” Nation-states are for Anderson a kind of material fiction, and national identities are their theme. Yet for all that’s illuminated by Anderson’s argument—secular vs. sacred temporalities, the importance of mass media, the role of literacy—the primacy of otherworldliness in the making of national identities is hopelessly obscured. This is a crucial lacuna because the germ of otherworldliness is at the root of a variety of specious religious and secular binaries, and no critical theory can successfully disengage (i.e. Foucault), overcome (i.e. Nietzsche), or sublate (i.e. Hegel) these binaries without coming to terms with otherworldliness. My paper will use the ICBL’s (International Committee to Ban Landmines) “pyramid of shoes” campaign as an evocative example of the kind of otherworldliness I am suggesting lay at the axis of secular worldmaking. This “secular” protest movement, begun in the 1990s, is an ongoing mnemonic ritual in which protestors cast old pairs of shoes onto an enormous pile as they gather to march against the world’s unclaimed landmines. As I’ll show, this ritual has more in common with “religious” pilgrimages than labor strikes, and by drawing on a close reading of Chapter 8 of Rousseau’s Social Contract, I will show that modernity’s original protest movement, the secular nation-state, is driven by a kind of otherworldly zeal.
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Field #1. Redefining ‘secularism’: European states and the regulation of (minority) religions
Field #2. Nadia Fadil
Field #3.
Field #4. KULeuven
Field #5.
Field #6. The biopolitics of the occult. Unraveling the theological texture of de-radicalization policies.
Field #7. This contribution seeks to offer a reflection on the politico-theological dimensions of the so-called policies of “de-radicalisation”. Introduced in the early 2000 in the Netherlands, and adopted since by various Western-European countries, the dispositif (Foucault) of counter-radicalization has become one of the most influential preventive public policy measures in the aftermaths of the various terrorist attacks since 2015 in Europe. At the heart of this discourse is the idea that a timely and correct identification of potential ‘signs’ of radicalization, and subjecting the concerned subjects to deradicalization programs, can enable the prevention of violence. Yet despite their ubiquitous presence, these policies have also consistently been challenged on their efficacity, value-neutrality and the way in which they selectively target and securitize ethnic and religious minorities (and Muslims in particular). The question hence remains as to why these public policies are maintained, leading some authors to consider these policies of counter-radicalization as a new form of ‘magical thinking’ (Ragazzi 2016). This paper takes off from this suggestion, but not merely with the intention to critically discharge these policies of counter-radicalization on epistemological and ontological grounds, but rather to examine how these policies of counter-radicalization shed a light on the politico-theological textures of modern biopolitical life. Building upon some recent scholarly works that have sought to unpack the politico-theological dimensions within the domain of security and warfare in the construction of the enemy, or in the justification of violence (Salhoub-Kevorkian 2015, Gutkowski 2014), this paper will attend to how the occult is entailed within the notions of risk as defined within these policies, and how the focus on “extremist worldviews” (denkbeelden) is mediated by a liberal and secular grammar and understanding of the Self. Academic works and public policies on counter-radicalisation in the Netherlands and Belgium (since 2004) will serve as an empirical basis for this theoretical exploration.
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Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Yusuf Ziya Ogretici
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Glasgow
Field #5.
Field #6. An Analysis of the Effect of Subjectivation on Religious Education Through Morality and Spirituality
Field #7. This paper contributes to the discussion on how morality may be uncertain when life orientation changes, for instance, from religious belief to spirituality. Accepting the ‘subjectivation’ thesis as a key concept in understanding the contemporary world, the spiritual realm is treated as a site on which the subjective turn has made a tremendous impact. That turn is investigated particularly in a comparison between “subjective-life” spirituality and “life-as” religion. Then, this paper asks what happens to morality when people’s religious belief disappears, changes, or evolves into spiritual experience. Educational practices are also viewed as a resonant field where the subjective turn has impacted on morality. The context of this paper refers to the subjective turn, as explained by The Spiritual Revolution: Why Religion is Giving Way to Spirituality (Heelas et al., 2005). Then, the comparison of “life-as” and “subjective-life” is expressed according to their diverse values. Finally, the conclusion deals with the crucial points of morality in subjective life. In this regard, it is stressed that ‘subjectivation’ is a feature of our time, and presenting a remarkable challenge in the realm of values. Since their orientations are different, ‘subjective-lives’ have a different disposition in morality than the mode of “life-as”. Although it is impossible to generalize concerning whether or not spirituality is moral, nevertheless, it is expected that there will be challenges for religious education when dealing with spirituality. Keywords: morality; spirituality; religion; religious education; life-as; subjective-life
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Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Umit YAZMACI
Field #3. Ali Kemal DOGAN
Field #4. Université Paris I
Field #5.
Field #6. De la génération en or pieuse à une génération déiste : Le débat public autour de l’émergence du déisme au sein de la jeunesse de la « Nouvelle Turquie d’Erdoğan »
Field #7. Lors d’un discours à l’Assemblée nationale en avril 2018, le président Recep Tayyip Erdoğan a appelé d’une manière inhabituelle le ministre de l’éducation nationale à la tribune de l’orateur pour lui demander devant les caméras la question de l’émergence d’une génération de jeunesse déiste en Turquie, tout particulièrement au sein des établissements scolaires catéchèses, à savoir les lycées des imams et des prédicateurs. Or le rapport final d’un colloque national portant sur « la jeunesse et la foi » organisé, peu avant, par les professeurs et les instituteurs de morale et de religion à Konya, une ville centre d’Anatolie reconnue de son conservatisme, avait conclu qu’il s’agit d’une tendance croissante envers le déisme parmi les jeunes suivant un enseignement religieux. Un tel phénomène est inattendu, décevant et difficile à accepter pour un mouvement politique qui est largement identifié à l’islamisme politique par des différents chercheurs, car les différents gouvernements d’AKP depuis 2002 (Parti de la justice et du développement) ont minutieusement suivi d’un programme politique conservateur auprès de la jeunesse par le biais des considérables instruments publics, notamment ceux de la ministère de l’éducation nationale, de la présidence des affaires religieuses (Diyanet) et des organisations civiles proches des confréries religieuses. En partant de cette affaire précise, cette contribution se donne pour objectif de discuter les instruments et les conséquences de politiques l’AKP pour former une génération pieuse mettant en avant la transformation des rapports de la jeunesse au fait religieux dans « la nouvelle Turquie d’Erdoğan ».
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Singing, Ritualising and Memory Making
Field #2. Silvia Mesturini
Field #3.
Field #4. UCL
Field #5.
Field #6. Singing, ritualising and meaning making with ayahuasca
Field #7. This paper is based on compared ethnographic material from fieldwork led in international networks formed through the circulation of practitioners and practices related to the ritual use of an Amazonian vegetal decoction, internationally known as ayahuasca. We shall address the role, dynamics and variety of songs in two types of ritual entanglements: one from the Shipibo community of the central Peruvian Amazon, the other from a spiritual centre of the Brazilian north-east, inspired from the Brazilian ayahuasca churches of the Santo Daime and the União do Vegetal. Singing, ritualizing and meaning making shall be the three lines we will follow in order to ethnography our way down to the heart of these experiential frames.
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Field #1. Hybrid religious identities: methodological implications
Field #2. Radu Muresan
Field #3.
Field #4. Univerity of Bucharest
Field #5.
Field #6. The study of neopagan movement in Romania. Perspectives and methodological challenges
Field #7. The phenomenon neopaganism in Central and Eastern Europe has received a special attention in the last years, the subject being approached from different perspectives (religious studies, sociology of religion, anthropology etc) and leading to different conclusions as concerns the way to „craft” the pagan communities, the construction of the neopagan identity or relationship with the local culture and tradition. In Romania, the neopagan communities are in full process of organizing and defining their identity, and the neopagan voices are increasingly vocal in public space. The paper I propose presents the results of an empirical research about the characteristics of neopaganism in Romania using, as starting point, the information that the pagans themselves are posting in the online environment. This research explores how neo-pagans build their identity, individually or in community, in a context which is mostly Orthodox Christian. Our intention is to highlight the values to which neo-pagans relate in Romania and to show how they interact with Christian values, to establish the role of ethnocentrism in their discourse or to look for their possible involvement in the public life. This paper aims to highlight the challenges that this kind of research encounters in Romania: there are no sociological surveys among the neopagans, the last census does not contain a specific heading referring to neopagans, whereas the religious anthropology did not grant, until this moment, a special attention to neopagan communities.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Redefining ‘secularism’: European states and the regulation of (minority) religions
Field #2. Bige Acimuz
Field #3. Berna Zengin Arslan
Field #4. Ozyegin University
Field #5.
Field #6. Reforming Laïcité? The Reform Project (Projet de Reforme) in France
Field #7. This paper focuses on the reform debates in France and the question of the transformation of the secular state’s relation to religion at large and Islam in specific. The reform project, announced by President Macron and predominantly seen as a project for ‘reforming Islam’, has found expressions in the media with sensational cases that speaks to the rising fear of Islam in the French public sphere. The Project will follow the Senate Report of 2016, which was released after a period of minor changes that followed the reformation attempts of the Sarkozy period. The Report, which mainly engaged with the questions of the formation of imams, the financing of the mosques, and the regulation of the existing Muslim schools, is posed as the result of the state’s interest in understanding the current issues of the Muslim community and its increasing concern ‘to fight extremism’ and control radicalization among Muslim groups. The draft of the 1905 law reform project is expected to be released in January 2019, but material currently available in the media shows that the French state intends to, on the one hand, strengthen Muslim organizations in France for the purpose of building a so-called ‘French Islam’ that is in harmony with the ideals, values, and the laws of the French state, and, on the other hand, to intensify their oversight of religious activities. Examining the Reform Project’s draft from a legal perspective, we will analyze whether the effort to regulate Muslim associations in France will result in the state’s increasing engagement with religious services at large. We will discuss whether this will be a gesture towards a new secular governmentality that moves the French case closer to the multiculturalist model. Ostensibly, it will not be a deviation from the secular framework, but the question is how or whether the French state will be ‘loosening’ its laïc approach with the intent to preserve its sovereignty in the face of public panic over the ‘threat of Islamic radicalization’.
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Field #1. Redefining ‘secularism’: European states and the regulation of (minority) religions
Field #2. Berna Zengin Arslan
Field #3.
Field #4. Ozyegin University
Field #5.
Field #6. Defining Alevism: Religious Recognition, Secularism and the State in Europe
Field #7. Alevis are the largest religious minority in Turkey, yet they do not have the status of religious minority, while only some of the non-Muslim minorities are recognized by the Lausanne Treaty, 1923. The secular state in Turkey have long favored the Sunni majority, excluding Alevis from the state’s religious services provided by the Diyanet, and mandating all children to take compulsory religion courses that teaches Sunni Islam. On the other hand, although they are a much smaller minority, Alevis have more legal rights in EU, largely recognized as a religion in Europe, including the UK, Austria, Sweden, Denmark, Switzerland and some states of Germany. This owes to a great extend the so-called ‘Alevi revival’ started in 1990s by the Alevi organizations that are established in Europe. My paper focuses on how Alevis are legally recognized in Europe as a religion, and the legal rights they have in Turkey. Based on the interviews conducted with the leaders and the members of the Alevi organizations in Berlin, I explore how the legal framework within which the secular state recognizes religion affects the way Alevis represent themselves to the public, and define their belief system and the rituals. The research is framed with the theoretical perspective that it is the state, which ultimately decides what counts as religion (Turner and Arslan, 2013). Within this framework, examining how Alevism is defined as a ‘religion’ in Europe in the process of recognition, I will comparatively analyze how the state regulates, and governs the field of religion; how it draws the boundaries of what is accepted as religion; and how the religious actors negotiate it in expressing their claims.
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Field #1. Singing, Ritualising and Memory Making
Field #2. anne-marie vuillemenot
Field #3. anne-marie vuillemenot
Field #4. UCL
Field #5.
Field #6. Chants soufis et mantras tibétains : ambiances rituelles kazakhes et ladakhi / Sufi Songs and Tibetan Mantras: Kazakh and Ladakhi Ritual Atmospheres
Field #7. A partir de différentes situations et perspectives ethnographiques, cette session rassemble des contributions où le chant fonde l’expérience religieuse. Comment et en quoi ? Il s’agit de suivre les liens entre le chant et ses cadres collectifs, dans des gestes et séquences partagés, tantôt marqués comme rituels voire « sacrés », tantôt désignés comme fêtes « profanes ». L’hypothèse transversale propose aux participants de réfléchir à l’expérience partagée, partageable et ouverte au milieu comme ce qui permet au chant d’apparaître en tant que véhicule de mémoire, transcendant le langage, et véhicule de fabrication de liens et de collectif, transcendant la négociation / From Sufi songs of Baqsylyq in Kazakhstan to the mantras recited by ladakhi oracles, this presentation explores the soundscape of practices where invisible ones are manifested in the body of ritualizers they possess. By its rhythm and its inflections, the ritual song acts and makes act the participants engaged in the same saving and transforming work. By the circulation of the beautiful word in the ritual space-time, the song institutes world beings at the foundation of these societies.
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Jose Santiago
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Field #5.
Field #6. Imaginaire de continuité et religion dans deux identités nationales d'origine catholique: Québec et le Pays Basque en perspective comparée
Field #7. Cette présentation a pour objectif d'analyser la construction de l'imaginaire de continuité permettant la narration de l'identité nationale en comparant deux endroits de forte tradition catholique, le Québec et le Pays Basque. On observe que le catholicisme a cessé d'avoir une significativité sociale en tant que marque de l'identité nationale, conséquence du processus de sécularisation. Ceci a rendu nécessaire l'élaboration d'un imaginaire de continuité nationale qui permettrait de rendre plausible "imaginer" la Nation. Nous verrons le rôle que la religion, envisagée selon la définition donnée par D. Hervieu-Léger, a eu dans la construction de cet imaginaire qui repose sur deux piliers: la sacralisation de l'histoire et la sacralisation du territoire.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Religion and gender: on defensive and reflexive developments in religious contexts
Field #2. Ruth Tsoffar
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Michigan
Field #5.
Field #6. Insult/Assault
Field #7. Insult/Assault Founding narratives have been a fixture of Jewish collective consciousness. In the Zionist enterprise, the Bible wields immense constitutive power as the primal script, giving birth to selfhood, nation and ontology. They have interred Jewish Israeli consciousness beneath layers of morality, legitimacy, and righteousness, enforced by privileged cultural authorities, institutions, and myriad models and practices of identification. How can we assess the impact of saturated textuality on subjectivity and gender, and how to account for its violence? How issues such as homogeneity and collective nationhood, for example, have produced a certain taken for granted, exclusionary reading. In this paper I elaborate on the interaction between Sarai and Hagar in Genesis 16, showing how they have produced not only the first cry and laughter, but also the two marked categories of inclusion and exclusion. Following the logic of the male gaze I conceptualize the “pregnancy gaze” as the patriarchal desire for pregnant bodies, articulating both the extent of Hagar’s withering gaze and of Sarai’s insult. Sarai’s torture of Hagar unleashes a series of bodily, mental and discursive ruptures, all collapsing categories of self, body and culture. In addition I will describe other efforts that have been made to diversify the reading beyond canonical, institutional, and patriarchal practices. By paying attention to the hidden violence of saturated ideology and to the trap of otherness we can start to unlearn reading, a critical step to “undoing” not only its gender construct, but also its ethnic, nationalist, and religious bondage.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Politics and economics of monasticism
Field #2. Anthony Grimley
Field #3.
Field #4. St Mary's University
Field #5.
Field #6. An exploration of the rtelationship between society, culture and new monasticism as found within the UK and Ireland
Field #7. Within the UK and Ireland, towards the end of the twentieth century and beginning of the twenty first century, we have witnessed a growing body of Christians living outside the cloistered life, who are seriously considering the benefits of monasticism, as a way of enhancing their own Christian lives and their own vocations, within both the Church and within society at large. Emerging between what seems to be polarity of subservience to, and subversion on, contemporary culture - what is the relationship between modern culture and monasticism as ingested by new monastics? In a recent lecture, exploring the role of ‘new monasticism’ in the twenty first century, Michael Casey (Cistercian Monk) paused to pose a question to his audience, ‘how monastic is the new monasticism’? Casey chose not to answer the question. In 2004 I entered a dialogue with the then Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, concerning new monasticism watering down the monastic vision, his reply was, ‘I quite take the point about the risks of redefining the essence of the monastic calling itself in a way that might undermine its integrity.’ David Walker, as part of his role as chairman of the Advisory council for relations between Bishops and Religious Communities, has recently published a paper which explores Anglican new monasticism within a larger phenomenon of English monasticism. Walker ends with a question ‘has the term monastic been extended so far as to have lost all real meaning? This paper explores the emerging relationship between society, culture and new monasticism as found within the UK and Ireland.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Liberation Christianity in Latin America. Politics, Religion and Spirituality in the Global South
Field #2. Armando Garcia Chiang
Field #3.
Field #4. Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mexico
Field #5.
Field #6. La situation actuelle du Cristianisme de libération au Mexique
Field #7. Pendant les dernières décennies du vingtième siècle, le christianisme de libération a été identifié en tant que composant de nombreux mouvements sociaux latino-américains comme la révolution sandiniste, la rébellion au Salvador, la révolte guatémaltèque ou l’élection de Bertrand Aristide à Haïti. Dans le contexte mexicain, il a été identifié avec la rénovation pastorale du diocèse de Cuernavaca, la politisation de la région de l’Isthme de Tehuantepec à Oaxaca, tout comme le processus d’organisation populaire de San Cristobal de las Casas et l’insurrection zapatiste. Au Mexique, ce courant a eu quatre caractéristiques distinctives: a) le mouvement étudiant catholique a eu une influence minimale ou même nulle dans son évolution (à différence de la majorité des pays où le christianisme de libération a eu un développement important); b) la non participation de l’Action Catholique dans son développement; c) le rôle des comités de défense des droits de l’homme comme expression et comme étape du développement du christianisme de libération au Mexique et d) la centralité du rôle joué par les évêques dans sa conformation. À l'heure actuelle, le rôle du christianisme de libération au Mexique semble être marginal, ne laissant que le diocèse de Saltillo, dans le nord du pays, comme l'un des derniers bastions de cette tendance. Dans ce contexte, ce travail cherche à identifier les vestiges d’un mouvement qui a semblé, pendant un bref laps de temps, transformer l’Église catholique latino-américaine.
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Field #1. Criminalization of religion in contexts of authoritarian democracies: a compared perspective from Latin America and the Middle-East
Field #2. Marie-Christine Doran
Field #3. Marie-Christine Doran
Field #4. Université d'Ottawa
Field #5.
Field #6. Le religieux comme vecteur de transformation de la défense des droits face à la criminalisation et la violence au Chili et en Colombie
Field #7. Le Chili et la Colombie font partie des 5 pays d’Amérique latine où les populations amérindiennes et/ou afro-descendantes sont les plus ciblées par des lois et mesures de criminalisation, entraînant de lourdes peines pour leurs actions de défense des droits mais aussi de la violence directe à leur endroit. Des résultats de recherches-terrains récentes menées dans ces deux pays montrent que les populations amérindiennes et afro-descendantes, engagées dans la défense des droits et de l’environnement à divers niveaux, mettent de l’avant leurs propres conceptions religieuses comme vecteur de revendication mais aussi de transformations profondes quant à de la manière de concevoir l’horizon des droits. À un premier niveau, le religieux se voit mobilisé pour tenter d’amoindrir la portée de la répression et de la criminalisation en faisant appel à des droits individuels, comme la liberté de croyance, mieux protégés que les droits civils et politiques. Il est aussi revendiqué comme étant au cœur de visions amérindiennes et afro-descendantes des droits universels, lesquelles se fondent sur l’impossibilité de séparer, par exemple, souffrance des victimes du conflit armé en Colombie ou de la terreur d’État au Chili et « souffrance du territoire ». Parmi d’autres exemples qui seront analysés, les conceptions entourant la mort violente ou la réduction au silence des défenseurs des droits et leaders politiques amérindiens et afro-descendants révèlent que le tort collectif porté à la survie du monde spirituel issu des communautés se trouve placé au même niveau que les violations directes des droits humains des individus touchés.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Treating the Dead in the Aboriginal Worlds at the Age of Religious Pluralism
Field #2. Antonella Tassinari
Field #3.
Field #4. Federal University of Santa Catarina
Field #5.
Field #6. Rituals to the dead, rituals from the children: the role of childhood in funeral rituals among three Brazilian indigenous peoples
Field #7. Among the Galibi-Marworno of North Brazil, children play an important role during the funerals: they must sing proper songs and propose funny activities to bring joy and make people forget the sadness of the death. There is no funeral without children playing and singing in a way they learn from each other during these rituals. Following this path , this communication aims to analyze the relations between childhood and death among three indigenous rituals from Brazil: the funerals among the Galibi-Marworno of Amapá, mentioned above; the Kwarúp interethnic mortuary rituals performed by indigenous people from Xingu, Mato Grosso, which are finished through the iniciation of the young girls; and the young boys iniciation among the Maxakali of Minas Gerais, which rends tributes of the dead children. These three examples can demonstrate there are strong relations between death and childhood among indigenous peoples cosmologies and provide paths to better understand the role of the childhood in these contexts, as a mediator between the living and the dead.
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Field #1. Religion and Politics in Small Nations: Comparative Socio-cultural and Institutional Dimensions
Field #2. Xabier Itçaina
Field #3.
Field #4. Centre Emile DUrkheim-Sciences Po Bordeaux
Field #5.
Field #6. Une médiation politique : le travail de paix de l’Eglise catholique dans le conflit basque
Field #7. Le conflit basque a constitué l’un des derniers conflits nationalitaires violents d’Europe de l’Ouest, avant l’arrêt définitif des opérations armées de l’ETA (Euskadi ta Askatasuna) en 2011, le désarmement puis l’auto-dissolution de l’organisation en 2018. Parmi les acteurs du « marché » de la résolution de ce conflit, le rôle joué par certains secteurs de l’Eglise catholique a longtemps été minoré par les observateurs. Or, et ce depuis la transition démocratique, bon nombre d’initiatives en matière de médiation pacifiste ont émané de personnalités et de mouvements liés à la sphère catholique. Cette médiation s’est exercée à la fois sur le plan de la médiation généraliste, renvoyant à la promotion sociale de la paix et du dialogue, et sur le plan de l’intermédiation directe entre les parties les plus polarisées du conflit). En retour, le conflit nationalitaire a lui-même travaillé les clivages internes d’une institution catholique avec qui les nationalismes basques entretiennent des relations historiquement anciennes et complexes. Au-delà des valeurs généralistes affichées par l’ensemble des acteurs religieux (paix, réconciliation, vivre ensemble), des écarts significatifs apparaissent au sein même du champ religieux. Ces différences concernent fondamentalement les conceptions de la démocratie politique. Derrière les nuances des positionnements des acteurs religieux sur la paix se dessinent en creux autant de conceptions normatives distinctes (procédurales, radicales et délibératives) du traitement démocratique du fait différentiel nationalitaire. C’est à l’analyse de cette médiation religieuse plurielle que procédera cette communication, fondée sur une enquête qualitative menée en Pays basque espagnol et français (Itçaina 2019).
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Inter-religious relations
Field #2. Joan Hernandez-Serret
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Barcelona
Field #5.
Field #6. COMPLEX SYSTEMS BETWEEN RELIGIONS: INTERRELIGIOUS DIALOGUE
Field #7. A complex system is composed of several interconnected or interlaced elements or parts whose links create additional information not previously seen by the observer. As a result of the interactions between elements arise new properties emerge which it can not be explained from the properties of the isolated elements. The exhibition will focus on creating a framework for analyzing the relationship between groups of different religions, within an interreligious complext system, in order to discover those properties or processes of a system that it will not been reducible to the properties or processes of its constituent parts.
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Field #1. Congregations in Europe (Thematic)
Field #2. Anna Körs
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Hamburg
Field #5.
Field #6. Congregations and their potentials for social capital building
Field #7. Religious pluralization is one of the key issues of shaping social cohesion in European societies and at the same time one of the main challenges of the future. While religion, in particular, is often seen as delimiting, polarizing and destructive for social cohesion, the aim of this paper is to consider religions as a resource and to shed light on how religious communities as civil society actors can contribute to social cohesion. This perspective takes up the high expectations placed on religious communities by the political side in particular. Symptomatic of this is the “interreligious dialogue”, which is expected to contribute to a stronger social consensus, making religious communities a key actor. Despite these high normative expectations of them as bridge-builders between religions and between religions and society, religious communities are largely unexplored in the European context. I argue that not only “interreligious dialogue” explicitly aiming at mutual understanding but interreligious relations in general are highly relevant for living well together. The paper will give answers not only to the question of how congregations react to religious plurality and how far they build interreligious relations or, contrary to this, delimit themselves from other religions and social actors (“parallel societies”); but it will also explain why congregations act in the one or the other way and will analyze different theoretical approaches in terms of their explanatory value. The paper is based on a quantitative congregation study in Hamburg as the second largest city in Germany and self-claimed “capital of interreligious dialogue”.
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Field #1. Religiosity: Analysis of international and national quantitative surveys
Field #2. AGueda Bittencourt
Field #3. Paula Leonardi
Field #4. Unicamp/UERJ
Field #5.
Field #6. République au Brésil : l’éducation nationale partagé entre l’Etat et l’église
Field #7. Comprendre les rapports entre l´Église Catholique et l´État National constitue un défi que nous assumons dans cet article, en regard à ce qui s´est passé lors de la construction des états nationaux européens qui ont évolué en républiques laïques, ici, sous les tropiques, s´est élaborée la plus grande nation catholique, en nombre de fidèles, malgré la séparation de l´Église et de l´État due à l´avènement de la République. Il nous faut donc examiner les conditions qui ont rendu possible la mise en place d´une hégémonie. Ce n´est qu´au travers d´une telle analyse qu´il est possible de repérer les éléments qui constituent la diversification de confessions évangéliques et des églises dont les fidèles sont, pour la plupart, des dissidents du catholicisme en déclin. Pour ce faire, nous emprunterons les concepts d´Identité et de Nation élaborés par Gérard Noiriel et de l´habitus, comme l´ont formulé Norbert Elias et Pierre Bourdieu. Ces concepts nous permettent de saisir le processus de construction d’une idee de nation mis en place au Brésil dès la fin de la période impériale et resté constant tout au long de la période républicaine. Un tel processus était basé sur l'idée de l'élément européen blanc en tant qu'élément civilizateur, idée que cadrait avec le projet de l'Église pour l'Amérique latine. Le partage de la scolarité entre l'État et l'église est la preuve de l'alliance et ce qui a permis le maintien de l'hegemonie de l'Église Catholique au Brésil pendant presque un siècle du régime républicain. Cette étude a pour source principale une base de données sur les ordres et congrégations religieuses installés au Brésil.
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Field #1. Catholicism and Global Challenges
Field #2. Michael Hainz S.J.
Field #3.
Field #4. Department of Sociology of Religion and Church Sociology, Theological Faculty, Leipzig University
Field #5.
Field #6. How Do Entrepreneurs Relate Religiosity to Capitalism? Empirical Evidence from Catholic Poland
Field #7. Max Weber (1920) outlined, that relations between the economic and the religious sphere can considerably differ: By promising mundane goods, e.g. wealth, some religions, like the “primeval” ones or – one may add – contemporary Pentecostal churches, go along with economy. Others, namely “sublimated religions of salvation”, find themselves increasingly in “tension” with ever more rationalized economies. How do at present economic actors cope with the postulated tension between “brotherliness” and “market struggles”? In what forms do they eventually bridge their economic commitment and their religious convictions? Or do they rather treat both spheres as separated areas that have nothing to do with each other? Or do they even perceive business and religiosity as irreconcilably conflictive? And if such different patterns exist, what are the causes of this variety? These questions will be addressed with regard to the Polish society, which is both economically very dynamic and, at the same time, marked by relatively high levels of mainly Catholic religiosity. The data are taken from 30 qualitative interviews with medium-sized entrepreneurs and were collected in the Polish-German research project “Dynamic Capitalism – Static Religion? Reconstruction of the Interactions Between Economic and Religious Action of Entrepreneurs in Poland After 1989”.
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Field #1. Lived Religion and Museums
Field #2. Giovanna Rech
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Trento (Italy)
Field #5.
Field #6. "Pale and hostage of the politicians". Social conflicts in the restoration of an Italian Crucifix
Field #7. What happens when an object of devotion and affection becomes a heritage object? What are the limits of the need to protect an artistic historical asset of religious meaning? The Catholic churches are also museums, but the objects spread in the cities and on the territory, possess a devotional value that their museification interrupts. In north-eastern Italy, a municipality withdraws a crucifix from a votive niche to restore it. In the prolonged waiting for the return of the Crucifix, the small community of the inhabitants where the votive niche is located has activated with different types of protests. The heritage institutions declared the object of cultural interest so the municipality proceeds to the realization of a copy that was exposed some months later. The original is then protected in a small church belonging to the municipality. Through an ethnography, the case study discusses different sources of conflict: the symbolic and political level, but also the opportunity to consider the existence of a heritage community based on the recognition of a devotional value to the object. The value conferred to cultural heritage through systems of reference have different intrinsic goals: heritage institutions, confessional organizations, local politics and economic actors play different roles in this process. Secular and religious institutions can reach a common interpretative ground for conservation. The outcome is different if one considers the intrinsic meaning of these objects. While the level of artistic value offers neutral areas that enable comprehension, the level of symbolic value can lead to irreconcilable conflict.
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Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. Ellina Mourtazina
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Lausanne
Field #5.
Field #6. Seclusion, silence and solitude as a tourist attraction? Study case of Buddhist retreat tourism in Northern India
Field #7. Drawing on the ethnographical study case of people travelling to northern India to participate in Buddhist silent meditation retreats, this paper explores the emerging transnational phenomena of spiritual retreat tourism. While touristic experiences are often referred to as space-times of looseness (Elias, 1994), fun, free will and as an escape from norms that structures daily lives (Graburn, 1989), paradoxically an increasing number of people are attracted by seclusion, technological disconnection, solitude, silence, fasting, chastity and a strict daily pattern as a frame for theirs leisure travels. Whether to learn a new system of spiritual values, to experience silence, a sense of spiritual community to transform oneself or by accident, countless combination of motivations are lying behind the participation to those retreats. From a phenomenological approach, the aim of this paper is to shed light on the complex interplay between participants various motives and personal backgrounds and the religious “frame” (Bateson, 1972) set up by the structure of the Meditation Center, frame in which touristic behavior are proscribed.
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Field #1. Pope Francis, Religious Authority and the Media
Field #2. Meritxell Roselló
Field #3.
Field #4. Universitat Rovira i Virgili
Field #5.
Field #6. Habermas’s discursive ethics and communicative action for visibility of the religious issue in the press
Field #7. The aim of this paper is to establish a set of moral points based upon Jürgen Habermas’s Theory of Communicative Action, a new paradigm linked to Discourse Ethics. Habermas advocates a form of reason open to the “world of life” and thus the idea of a communicative rationality that encourages inclusive dialogue in the context of the media. The paper also introduces the principles of Habermas’s discourse ethics, which promote the communication of different accounts and arguments from cultural and religious minorities, groups and individuals. Finally, the paper presents news items about the Jewish, Muslim and Christian communities from mainstream Spanish and Catalan press to show the extent to which they coincide with the stipulations of Habermas’s discourse ethics.
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Field #1. New dynamics of traditionally Catholic societies
Field #2. philippe portier
Field #3. philippe portier
Field #4. EPHE
Field #5.
Field #6. Populisme and religion in France
Field #7. Catholicisme et populisme. Le cas de la France Philippe Portier Le populisme s’est imposé comme une force politique significative dans la plupart des pays européens. Très souvent, il appuie son discours sur des référents religieux, en se réclamant en particulier des « racines chrétiennes de l’Europe ». On voudrait dans cette communication développer deux points en s’appuyant préférentiellement sur le cas français. D’abord, on montrera comment les mouvements populistes - et notamment le Front national - emploient le référent religieux dans l’espace politique. Ensuite, on abordera les résistances de l’Eglise catholique à ce populisme qui insiste pourtant, souvent, sur l’entremêlement de la francité et de la catholicité. Cette situation n’est pas seulement le produit de la sécularisation contemporaine qui laisse ouverte la réception herméneutique du discours religieux. Elle renvoie au conflit, repérable en France depuis la Révolution française, entre deux théologies politiques.
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Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. Ola Wetterberg
Field #3.
Field #4. University of Gothenburg
Field #5.
Field #6. The attraction of the reconstructed past
Field #7. The past twenty years have seen an unprecedented activity of reconstructions of medieval wooden church buildings in the Scandinavian countries. There has been all kind of motivations, ambitions and skills underlying these activities. A few churches are built by the Church of Sweden to host the religious activities of a parish. More common are projects that have been set up as scientific experiments into craft skills, building constructions and timber quality, or have been built for pedagogic purposes in museum settings or in business-driven fun fairs. Yet another category of projects are related to the growing activities related to pilgrimage trails. Common to all of these projects is that they through their combination of reconstructed pastness values and religious attribution – historic or/and contemporary – are expected to attract a lot of attention mostly are part of an intentional destination policy, with different purposes. This paper will give a broad overview of the different kind of projects and analyse expectations as well as underlying needs and desires of the people involved. It will also trace historical roots to contemporary practices to be found both in secular and religious relations to history and pastness in small medieval parish churches.
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Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. Maria Nyström
Field #3.
Field #4. Gothenburg University
Field #5.
Field #6. Touristic development of historic churches in a post-secular society
Field #7. This study analyses how the changing religious landscape of Europe relates to the tourism industry and how this transforms the role of heritage institutions. During recent years, there has been a general development in Sweden, and other European countries, of decreasing numbers of worshippers in the traditional Christian denominations. Responding to this situation numerous projects have been launched by actors from heritage institutions, civil society and church institutions to find new models to manage the heritage of historic churches through tourism. Tourism can provide an important economic asset to the local community, but also presents difficulties in meeting the demands of tourists and worshippers alike (Levi & Kocher 2009). The study departs from two Swedish development projects connected to historic churches. These projects join actors from the heritage sector, the Church of Sweden and civil society in collaborative situations. How is the heritage of the Church being considered and expressed in relation to tourism? How are the roles and obligations of the various actors negotiated? An international comparison to similar examples will contribute to the analysis. The results show an uncertainty in the division of roles and duties between the church, civil society and heritage institutions in relation to the touristic initiatives that they take part in. The situation can be affected by vaguely defined goals in legislation and agreements, or by conflicting interests of the different actors. Levi, D., & Kocher, S. (2009). Understanding Tourism at Heritage Religious Sites. Focus, 6(1). doi:10.15368/focus.2009v6n1.2
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Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Pamela Dickey Young
Field #3. Pamela Young
Field #4. Queen's University
Field #5.
Field #6. Consonance on Values, Dissonance on Rules
Field #7. This paper will examine the attraction that religion and meaning-making have for young adults in Canada even in an era when many do not name themselves religious, or religious in any conventional way. Based on data collected from nearly 500 young adults in Canada, the paper will first examine what these have learned about “religion” from various sources, including their schooling. For these young adults, not surprisingly, religion often means “rules.” But even if they are not practitioners of or adherents to traditional religion, they remain fascinated by religion and, almost despite their lack of good education about religion, they are able to articulate coherent and thoughtful points of view about it. Further, although they often reject any notion of religion as “doctrinaire” they have not given up on meaning-making or strong adherence to sets of values that are important to them. Indeed, meaning-making is in many ways central to young adult identity formation. This paper will present the voices of some of the young adults from the Religion, Gender and Sexuality Among Youth in Canada study as a way to argue for presenting much broader understandings of religion in Canadian education systems so that these young adults might actually see themselves reflected there.
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Field #1. Inter-religious relations
Field #2. Laurence Faure
Field #3.
Field #4. Université Lumière Lyon 2 - Centre Max Weber
Field #5.
Field #6. Du texte sacré à sa mise en acte : relations avec l’altérité dans le judaïsme
Field #7. La Bible hébraïque comporte de nombreuses prescriptions concernant l’entretien des relations entre juifs et non juifs. Si l’hospitalité constitue un principe essentiel du judaïsme, « aimer son prochain » ne signifie pas pour autant communier en un même repas, ou a fortiori vivre et partager sa couche avec ce prochain lorsque ce dernier n’est pas de la même obédience religieuse. Dans la lignée d’écrits centrés sur l’interprétation des textes et leur socio-genèse, montrant que le judaïsme s’est historiquement construit à la fois selon une logique de différenciation alimentaire et de séparation entre juifs et non juifs, le propos vise plus spécifiquement à souligner comment se joue au quotidien l’interaction entre « la lettre » de la cacherout et la pratique, dans un interface où est en jeu l’interprétation de l’esprit de la loi. Il s’agira de s’interroger sur la mise en acte des préceptes religieux en soulignant leurs possibles conséquences sur l’entretien de relations entre juifs et non juifs, qu’ils soient religieux ou non. On pourra aussi se demander comment les individus, du fait de la diversité religieuse interne aux familles (alliances mixtes, degrés de pratiques religieuses différenciées) composent avec celle-ci dans leurs pratiques quotidiennes du judaïsme et en quoi le désir de transmission d’une affiliation religieuse aux enfants, fondée sur une orthopraxie, interfère-t-il avec l’entretien des relations entre membres juifs pratiquants, non pratiquants et membres non juifs au sein de la famille.
Field #8.


Field #1. Young people, Religion, Politics, and Education
Field #2. Yaron Schwartz
Field #3.
Field #4. Ben Gurion University
Field #5.
Field #6. Teaching Religious Teenagers about Machoism and Homophobia- On the Struggle of Religious High School Teachers with Legitimate Attitudes Towards Jewish Homosexuality
Field #7. Geopolitical changes in attitude towards sexuality, and especially in regard to the legitimizing of LGBT and homosexuality in the Western world, affect local social attitudes in Israel, with the demands for openness, acceptance and empathy making their mark even on the religious Jewish community. A specific analysis of this group reveals a wide range of perspectives on this topic, from extreme positions denying the possibility of Jewish homosexual masculinity, to religious groups which intentionally ignore their participants sexual lives. While this topic was discussed in the adult world alone, it was simpler to grapple with, but its increasing presence on television, internet and social media now demands of teachers in the religious community the articulation to their students of clearly defined opinions on religious homosexuals. In this lecture, we analyze dilemmas relating to religious homosexuality arising in the context of a religious school which has decided to develop a special unity of study dedicated to sexism, machoism and their relationship to homophobia, with the goal of engendering an empathic discourse among students on this topic. Despite this positive approach, educators are challenged by a host of questions requiring a straightforward explanation of their stance, knowing that their statements may influence the opinions and even the sexual identity of their students for years to come. The findings presented here were collected by ethnographic research based on the analysis of staff meetings, lesson plans, teachers’ meetings with religious homosexual men, observations of classes and surveys of students.
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Field #1. The reciprocal influence of religion and demography
Field #2. Ariela Keysar
Field #3. Sergio DellaPergola
Field #4. Trinity College, Hartford CT
Field #5.
Field #6. Jewish Millennials in the U.S. and Israel: Demographic and Religious Dimensions
Field #7. Comparing the two largest Jewish populations in the world, the U.S. and Israel, we explore the mutual relationship between demography and religion. We focus on young adults of the millennial generation. Utilizing two large national surveys, Pew U.S. Survey 2013 and Pew Israel Survey 2015, we demonstrate how different levels of religiosity, of Jewish peoplehood, and of nationalism explain some of the emerging differences in Jewish identification between the two countries and within each country. Regardless of where Jews are, Jewishness is recognized as an assortment of multiple meanings, secular and religious ones. Leading an ethical and moral life and working for justice and equality in society are more essential meanings for American Jews, while ‘observing Jewish law’ are more important for Israelis. Among the young, however, the two populations are closer. Young Jewish adults in Israel and in the U.S., especially those 18-21 years old, seem to view Jewishness mainly as a matter of religion rather than as a culture or ethnicity. This may be because there has been a rise in levels of religiosity among younger Jewish Millennials in both countries. Demography is destiny: Higher birth rates among the religious increase their share of the population. In turn, a larger share of religious people with high fertility results in a more youthful age structure. It also changes the religious landscape, resulting in a more Orthodox population and a lower intermarriage rate.
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Field #1. Religion and Urban Politics
Field #2. Lovemore Ndlovu
Field #3.
Field #4. Independent Researcher
Field #5.
Field #6. Reflections on Mugabe’s relations with Pentecostalism in Zimbabwe
Field #7. In the last 18 years (2000 – 2018), Zimbabwe witnessed the proliferation of various forms of religiosity in the cities especially within the ambit of the Pentecostal tradition. Pentecostalism in Zimbabwe is a popular urban phenomena and this has led to increased competition within the religious urban market place and religion is commodified and aggressively marketed in all forms of media. During the same period Zimbabwe was plunged into the worst economic crisis of all time under the leadership of former President Robert Mugabe. Against this background, the paper sought to explore and reflect on Mugabe’s relations or interactions with Pentecostalism in Zimbabwe especially during the last 18 years of his tenure. The research found that Mugabe displayed an ambivalent and complex character or identity in his approach to Pentecostalism. At one moment he described some Pentecostal pastors as thieves and even pondered why educated Zimbabweans would easily fall prey to the machinations or manipulations of the “thieving pastors” and in other occasions he closely interacted with Pentecostal pastors who supported his ZANU (PF) party.
Field #8. I consent to my information being collected / Je donne mon accord pour que mes données personnelles soient collectées


Field #1. Plurality of Religious Policies and Performances: Catholic Migrants in France
Field #2. HUGO SUAREZ
Field #3.
Field #4. UNAM
Field #5.
Field #6. Trois espaces pour migrants dans la cathédrale de Notre Dame de Paris
Field #7. Dans le cadre de recherches sur la diversité religieuse et les migrations en France, le document présentera les résultats des observations ethnographiques réalisées dans trois chapelles de la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris. La présence internationale au centre du catholicisme français s'exprime dans trois chapelles régulièrement visitées par un large public dédié à trois pays ou regions: la Chine, la Pologne et l'Amérique latine. D'une part, l'histoire de chacun d'eux sera brièvement expliquée et, d'autre part, à partir d'un dossier photographique et d'une observation ethnographique, seront analysés le type de pratiques et les profils des croyants occupant l'espace. Les questions de fond sont les suivantes: quelle est la place des expressions religieuses étrangères dans Notre-Dame? comment les croyants utilisent et s'approprient cet espace? quelles sont les interactions entre l’institution et les fidèles migrants à l’intérieur de la cathédrale?
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Field #1. Spiritual Tourism
Field #2. Maria Lúcia Bastos Alves
Field #3. Jose Evaristo de Oliveira Filho
Field #4. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte
Field #5.
Field #6. Religious Fests, Cultural Heritage And Tourism
Field #7. One of the central questions in the study of Cultural Heritage refers to the process of preserving tangible and intangible assets as a fundamental factor to know the cultural, social and political history of a particular place. The starting point was the perception that in many tourist destinations in the world what is actually visited are the temples and local religious festivals, even if the choice of the trip was not have based on the religious beliefs of the tourist. This is also the case of the Rio Grande do Norte state at Brazil, which since 1990, governmental public politics in partnership with private companies have promoted new pilgrimage routes. This article examines the effectiveness of political and ecclesiastical actions related to the valorization and dissemination of religious manifestations with the objective of analyzing the implementation of new tourist destinations. The research allows us to sketch historical traces of the Brazilian religious culture and its importance, regional and local, making it possible to analyze the transformations, benefits or losses that result from the public tourism policies developed in the country. We chose the descriptive and ethnographic method as an analytical resource of the produced literature associated with the dissonant voices about the conceptions of religious festivals to be converted into immaterial patrimony and that, therefore, they need protection and safeguard so that they can be preserved and transmitted to the future generations in the face of the tourism, in its religious, socio-cultural, political and market aspects.
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Field #1. To leave or to stay. Transition to adulthood and religious belonging
Field #2. Kim Lam
Field #3.
Field #4. Deakin University
Field #5.
Field #6. The cosmopolitan irony of belonging in post-multicultural and super-diverse Australia
Field #7. While Australia has long been heralded a multicultural success story, issues of security in a post 9/11 context have led to the introduction of more stringent citizenship tests and a social cohesion agenda which emphasises national identity and the safeguarding of Australia against foreign threats. Additionally, super-diversity within Australia has not only led to the diversification of diversity, but also the diversification of attitudes towards diversity.